Samsung’s Gear S3 smartwatch hasn't been out that long, but the South Korean electronics giant is already looking to the future – as evidenced by three intriguing new concepts shown off at Baselworld 2017.Working alongside Yvan Arpa, the renowned Swiss luxury watch designer, the trio certainly look like they would shake up Samsung's existing range.While aesthetically identical to Samsung's flagship wearable, this concept houses a traditional Swiss watch mechanism, so it's not really a smartwatch at all.How Samsung could combine smartwatch tech with old school mechanics in a finished product remains to be seen, but that's hardly the point – it's a concept, remember?Samsung also has its sights set on anyone hipster enough to still want to own a pocket watch.This hybrid design encapsulates the classic, antiquated time piece look with 2017 wearable smarts, and would surely be a cult hit if it ever made it on to shelves.
Page 1: Design, Performance & VerdictAudio settings need a little tweakingGets a little uncomfortable with prolonged use
Finding the right tech talent is hard no matter where you are.Finding it along Interstate 20 in northern Louisiana has been particularly challenging.One of the first major public-private collaborations started in 2007 with the creation of the National Cyber Research Park and the Cyber Innovation Center in Bossier City, which hugs the Red River across from Shreveport.The center has worked aggressively to bring more tech employers to the region, including IBM, the Computer Sciences Corporation and CSRA, a tech services provider for government.Speaking at a cybersecurity summit convened in Louisiana by CenturyLink on March 8, Craig Spohn, the center’s executive director and president, explained why the region has lagged, despite CenturyLink’s headquarters being rooted along I-20 in Monroe.Bill Bradley, senior vice president of cyber engineering and technology services at CenturyLink, welcomed the region’s new entrants and the thousands of jobs they have added.
Yesterday London experienced its largest terrorist incident since the 2005.In 2005, radios did not work on the Tube network, which hindered the ability to coordinate the rescue of the people trapped underground.These devices don’t use the normal mobile network, but a special “trunked” network designed for emergency services, and is arguably more analogous to old-fashioned walkie-talkies than mobile phones.New gadgets exist, like the “Throwbot”, which is essentially a camera on wheels and is designed for reconnaissance in tight spaces.Since 7/7, real time CCTV has been introduced on London buses, using the 3G and 4G networks to send the signals back to base.Similarly, in the last few years the government has approved explosive trace detection systems for use in airports.
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Oh, so you don't want to hear about the Vax Blade Cordless and its trademarked Direct Helix Technology?Or learn about its 32V Lithium battery and the 45 minutes of top-class suction it delivers?By which we can only assume they mean vertically or horizontally, rather than a new theoretical spatial dimension.But, yes, you'll be able to cleanse your walls, floors, ceilings and, well, just about every surface of dust, dirt and more.The weighting of the main unit has been distributed to hang from your hand at just the right angle, with a lovely power button right under your thumb - so you can feel like a proper mean cleaner.What's more, the 32V model delivers power to rival most corded suckers, so you shouldn't notice a darn bit of difference when you're going at the kitchen floor - apart from the lack of wires trailing about the place.
Drinks manufacturer and bottler to the stars of the fizzy pop world Britvic has an idea that could save the world from gradual plasticisation and the death of the sea -- a wooden drinks bottle.You could just throw it on the floor when you're done having your 20 teaspoons of sugar.A basket of new moulding and processing techniques are being used by the bottler to assemble wood fibres into those bottle-shaped things everyone needs to hug as they go about their business these days, and it's even come up with a bottle top made out of the same fibres creating, potentially, a fully world-friendly bottle.Britvic's Clive Hooper doesn't seem to be hugely optimistic that it's anything more than an eco-friendly headline at the moment, though, as he told Business Green that: "The project is still at the exploratory R phase.I don't know whether the pulp bottle will become a mainstream bottle in the future, but what it is for us is an opportunity to experiment with new materials."There will need to be some sort of coating on it, though, to keep it watertight.
The state pension age is rising faster than planned, with the latest round of changes strongly suggesting that people currently young and sprightly won't start receiving theirs til they're into their seventies.This is coming from two separate sources: an independent report saying the planned rise to 68 should happen seven years earlier (in 2039), and a government report saying anyone the pension age for anyone currently under 30 will likely be 70.The state pension age (SPA) is the earliest age anyone's allowed to receive a state pension.Interestingly, the most recent announcements are in line with where it started out: back in 1908 when the Old Age Pension (as it was called then) began, it was paid to men over 70 who earned £31 a year or less.That's just over £3,000 in today's money, but salaries were pretty different back then.So was society: married men got more money than single ones, and the average life expectancy was 47.
Yesterday London experienced its largest terrorist incident since the 2005.In 2005, radios did not work on the Tube network, which hindered the ability to coordinate the rescue of the people trapped underground.These devices don’t use the normal mobile network, but a special “trunked” network designed for emergency services, and is arguably more analogous to old-fashioned walkie-talkies than mobile phones.New gadgets exist, like the “Throwbot”, which is essentially a camera on wheels and is designed for reconnaissance in tight spaces.Since 7/7, real time CCTV has been introduced on London buses, using the 3G and 4G networks to send the signals back to base.Similarly, in the last few years the government has approved explosive trace detection systems for use in airports.
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The World Meteorological Organisation's International Cloud Atlas has added twelve new types to its list of recognised clouds, including one lobbied for by cloud appreciators (yes, really).The physical version of the Atlas has existed since the 1800s, but has just gone digital with its first update since the 80s and is now accessible to the public as well as meteorologists.The new version has some exciting additions:Several new, formal cloud classifications have been introduced.These include one new species (volutus), five new supplementary features (asperitas, cauda, cavum, fluctus and murus), and one new accessory cloud (flumen).The species floccus has been formally recognised as being able to occur in association with stratocumulus.
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It's all happening in Pokémon Go.Developer Niantic announced yesterday that an unexpected Water Festival would be kicking off at 8pm UK time, and it lasts until 8pm on the 29th.During the festival, you've got more chance of running into water 'mon like Magikarp, Squirtle, Totodile and so on – and you've got a better chance of finding Gen 2 water species in watery areas too.At the same time, PoGo users started finding shiny Pokémon in the wild, including this Reddit user's Magikarp:Shortly afterwards, Twitter user IsolinoSA reported that evolving a shiny Magikarp resulted in a red Gyarados:@trnrtips I just evolve a shiny magikarp and got a RedGyarados pic.twitter.com/p1kitSCXx8
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But when you search Google for “Great Barrier Reef,” that’s not all that you’ll find.Instead, at the very top of the page in the Top Stories module, you’ll see a Breitbart article dismissing the damage done to the famed coral reef that sounds like it was written by a student who hasn’t slept in 72 hours.We were first alerted to the placement of the story—written by notorious climate change denier James Delingpole—by Twitter user Cody Brown.I’ll lay money that if you asked this question to your kids’ biology teacher or to Bill Nye the Junk Science Guy or to that nice Richard Osman off Pointless or to Matt Damon or anyone else who would have voted for Hillary Clinton or to any Labour (and a good many Conservative) politicians or anyone who works for the ABC in Australia, the BBC, the Guardian, MSNBC, CNN and the New York Times or comedy Senator Al Franken or Myles Allen, Professor of Geosystem science at Oxford University or pretty much any other science prof from Oxford, Cambridge, Harvard or Yale or any marine biologist or a lawyer from a big City law firm or anyone who voted Remain in the EU Referendum, you’d get the same answer: “Yes.”Listen, this guy says he’s been to the Great Barrier Reef himself, folks, and did he see any of this phony liberal globalist scheme known as “climate change?” Nope!Take it from the coral reef experts surveying it, as Gizmodo covered last year:
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Update: We've done some digging and all the facts don't really add up.It's an easy story to fall for, given the Trump Organisation's track record, but we'll endeavour to do better in futureY Combinator’s Sam Altman recently called Trump “the Silicon Valley candidate” because of his disruptive nature.A 17-year-old only identified as Lucy tells The Hollywood Reporter that her website, trumpscratch.com, attracted the attention of the White House after receiving only about 1,200 visitors.She built the site as a joke while she was applying for web developer jobs back in February.It allows users to hit Trump in the face with cat paws while the rickroll music plays.
The cheque -- a bit of paper upon which you write a promise to have your bank send someone money and, somehow, it happens after about a week -- is about to be updated for the modern need-everything-now generation, with the funds soon to start clearing and appearing in the recipient's bank account within one day.It's all thanks to digital things, with the banks about to start swapping digital photographs of cheques with each other rather than relying on putting the actual pieces of paper in the post, taking the clearing process down from requiring a whole week's worth of working days to just one.There is a group of people called the Cheque and Credit Clearing Company in charge of it all, and it says that some banks might have all they need in place to start jazzing up the old cheque by the end of October, with all banks and building societies bound to have the new turbo clearing system in place by the end of 2018.Nothing ever happens quickly in the world of the cheque.Want more updates from Gizmodo UK?Make sure to check out our @GizmodoUK Twitter feed, and our Facebook page.
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A routine check performed by NASA has uncovered two tears on the treads of the Mars Curiosity Rover’s left middle wheel.Scientists with the Curiosity mission noticed the small breaks, both of which are on the rover’s raised treads, on March 19th.NASA last took a look at the wheels on January 27th and noticed nothing out of the ordinary, so the damage occurred only recently.NASA obviously isn’t happy about it, but insists the wear-and-tear will not change its current science plans or diminish the rover’s opportunities to study key features on Mars.“All six wheels have more than enough working lifespan remaining to get the vehicle to all destinations planned for the mission,” said Curiosity Project Manager Jim Erickson, in an agency release.Mission planners got a hint that Curiosity’s wheels were deteriorating faster than expected back in 2013, so they began to drive the rover in reverse as a protective measure.
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Scientists have found a thing that does us good by consuming it and the news that will shock you?It's only bloody old beer.They say, in a salted nutshell, that one pint a day reduces the risk of developing several serious heart conditions.The study was assembled by a joint team from the University of Cambridge and University College London, who aggregated the health records of around two million adults.Their data suggested that moderate drinkers who have no more than one tipple a day were less likely to see a doctor for heart worries, beating even teetotallers when it comes to heart wellbeing and recording fewer incidents of heart attack and blood clots.The full study published in the BMJ found that people who drink no alcohol were more likely to experience some forms of angina, aneurysm and arterial disease, although the benefits of a drink disappear as soon as those whose records were analysed strayed over the maximum official alcohol consumption guidelines.
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The internet has made it supremely easy to install connected security cameras wherever you want.Unfortunately for Nest, that easy connectivity makes it simple for hackers to disable its cameras with just a few keystrokes.Nest’s indoor and outdoor security camera as well as Dropcams and Dropcam Pros have serious-sounding vulnerabilities that let hackers disconnect the cameras with a Bluetooth command.Security researcher Jason Doyle discovered the flaws and reported them to Nest, but the Alphabet subsidiary has failed to release a patch.After Doyle published the details of the vulnerabilities, however, the company said that it’s aware of the issues and working on a fix.There are actually three vulnerabilities, all of which involve the most recent firmware, version 5.2.1, which was released in January 2016.
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A company promising the eco dream of electric flight says it might have a model ready, oh, within about ten years or so, with budget flier Easyjet helping steer the development on the commercial side of things.They've thought up a good name for the company at least -- Wright Electric.They say that within a decade they might be able to come up with an e-plane that's able to shuffle 150 people distances of up to 300 miles, presumably followed by a week-long turnaround for the thing to recharge.Wright Electric thinks that removing the need to pay for fuel might make flying even cheaper than it is now (as long as you only bring a rucksack), although enough electricity to haul 150 people and an aeroplane is going to need quite the expensive battery.The company has been assembled from a team that had prior development funding from NASA, which sounds great until you read the plan.It's all relying on battery technology getting significantly better, with the plane perhaps being bumped down to hybrid status if there's not a huge leap in power cell technology in the coming years.
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Twice Circled, the Bristol game studio behind Theme Hospital-esque Big Pharma, has announced its next title: and it's Roller Coaster Tycoon with fish.Megaquarium is all about taking care of your fish, fulfilling their care needs and helping them grow while making sure none of them eat each other.You've also got to think about the best way to lay out your tanks so that aquarium visitors and staff – who you're responsible for hiring – can see what's happening in there.There are unlockables in the form of new equipment, fish, crustaceans and invertebrates, and yep, you can breed your best ones together to make new species.It's Pokémon meets Theme Park meets Big Billy Bass.If you happen to be going to EGX Rezzed in London next week, you'll be able to play Megaquarium there.
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Virgin Media has just embarrassed all the other broadband providers by making ultrafast 100Mbps fibre its standard package, and increasing available speeds to 300Mbps.A slightly sassy quote from CEO Tom Mockridge points out that Virgin's packages begin where most providers top out (the highest widely-available Openreach speed is 76Mbps):"By beefing up our bundles we’re leaving our competitors in the rear view mirror, starting where they finish.Eye-watering speeds, a better box and top-notch TV is a winning combination.More and more switchers tell us they are joining Virgin Media for our faster speeds and we understand why - whether it’s 4K Netflix, box sets in multiple rooms or online gaming, the best entertainment requires the best broadband and we’re making sure our customers are covered with these bundles at incredible value.”If you get Virgin Fibre VIVID (VM's name for the top speed packages) on its own, your monthly cost on a 12-month contract including line rental starts at £32.25 for 100 meg and goes up to £47.25 for 300 meg.
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There are some New York restaurants that you can mention in any social setting and someone will invariably nod and intone, sagely, “Oh, yes, I go there all the time.” Somewhat remarkably for a vegan Ethiopian spot—in Bushwick, no less—Bunna Café is one of them.It’s one of those vegan restaurants where the absence of meat and dairy isn’t obvious while you’re there, but when you venture out the door your step has a new spring in it.The dining room at Bunna is dark, woody, filament-bulb-lit, and perennially almost full.Murmuring couples on dates provide backing vocals for out-of-towners visiting friends for the first time (“Brooklyn’s basically a big city, right?”), until a steel-drum band, say, strikes up a set, mixing Beatles covers with island rhythms.There may even be a coffee ceremony going on, with incense burning as demitasse cups are filled with pungent black liquid.At Bunna, which means “coffee” in Amharic, the ceremonial coffee is free.
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