Small businesses are key to preventing future data breaches in the UK according to a new report from Business in the Community (BITC) that details how SMBs can be part of the solution to prevent cybersecurity issues from impacting customers.The report, launched to coincide with 'Would you be ready?Week', aims to raise awareness of business resilience in organizations across the UK.Surprising though, BITC's report revealed that 40 percent of the SMBs surveyed had not taken any action on cybersecurity in the past 12 months.The organization also found that one in three small businesses do not have any cybersecurity strategies in place at all and more than three quarters (77%) said they have no policy for controlling access to their data systems.According to the City of London Police, which handles fraud in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, more than 2,000 cybercrimes were reported by businesses in 2018 affecting thousands of customers.
Cardiologists delivered some surprising news over the weekend: Contrary to previous recommendations, most healthy people should not be taking low-dose aspirin to prevent heart disease, according a report from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association.The report offers the usual advice for those hoping to ward off heart disease: eat a balanced diet of mostly plants, exercise, don’t smoke, etc.But the new recommendation against daily aspirin follows a 2018 study that found aspirin’s benefits didn’t seem to outweigh its risks.“Low-dose aspirin for primary prevention [is] now reserved for select high-risk patients,” according to the guidelines.The 2018 ASPREE study recruited almost 20,000 people mostly over the age of 70 in the U.S. and Australia, hoping to study the effects of long-term, low-dose aspirin use.Previously, doctors had recommended a daily dose of 75 mg to 100 mg to avert heart disease.
A team of scientists at the University of California San Diego sought to address this by spending six months co-designing robots with family members, social workers, and other caregivers who care for people with dementia.Researchers found that caregivers wanted the robots to fulfill two major roles: support positive moments shared by caregivers and their loved ones; and lessen caregivers' emotional stress by taking on difficult tasks, such as answering repeated questions and restricting unhealthy food."Caregivers conceived of robots not only managing difficult aspects of caregiving--but also for supporting joyful and fun activities," said Laurel Riek, a professor of computer science at UC San Diego, and the paper's senior author.Spouses or adult children provide 75 percent of the care for people with dementia.That is equivalent to 15 million people in the United States alone, providing 18 billion hours of unpaid care per year with little support and few resources.Caregivers are also likely to overlook their own health and wellbeing, which can put both parties at risk.
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A team of scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have taken inspiration from underwater invertebrates like jellyfish to create an electronic skin with similar functionality.Just like a jellyfish, the electronic skin is transparent, stretchable, touch-sensitive, and self-healing in aquatic environments, and could be used in everything from water-resistant touchscreens to aquatic soft robots.Assistant Professor Benjamin Tee and his team from the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the NUS Faculty of Engineering developed the material, along with collaborators from Tsinghua University and the University of California Riverside.Transparent and waterproof self-healing materials for wide-ranging applicationsAsst Prof Tee has been working on electronic skins for many years and was part of the team that developed the first ever self-healing electronic skin sensors in 2012.His experience in this research area led him to identify key obstacles that self-healing electronic skins have yet to overcome.
A £2 million-plus research collaboration between University of Huddersfield scientists and a leading specialist engineering firm will add a whole new dimension to 3D printing.Intricate, high-strength components for the aerospace industry and medical implants are among the products that could be made more speedily and economically as a result of research that aims to harness the potential of particle beams during additive manufacturing (AM), as 3D printing is known.The Huddersfield company Reliance Precision has teamed up with the University of Huddersfield's Professor Jaap Van Den Berg - whose specialities include ion beam technology - for two successive projects that have earned funding from the official body, Innovate UK.These projects have been key elements of Reliance's overall programme to develop a new generation of electron beam additive manufacturing (EBAM) machines that will enable much wider adoption of this form of 3D printing, in which metal powder is placed under a vacuum and fused together by heat from a high-energy electron beam.It is a technique that enables the production of highly complex components, building them up layer by layer.The first Innovate UK-funded project undertaken by Reliance and Professor Jaap Van Den Berg was named RAMP-UP, which stands for Reliable Additive Manufacturing technology offering higher Productivity and Performance).
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National Research and Education Networks (NRENs) aim to provide high-speed Internet service for research and education communities of their respective countries.They also develop and provide scholarly communication infrastructure as "above the net" services by integrating tools to support researcher workflows across various disciplines in response to demands from member institutions, which rely on them for shared services and economies of scale.Open Science is a new movement attracting global attention that seeks to make scientific processes and results more transparent and accessible.Sharing these materials allows others to evaluate, use, and analyze them in new ways, which speed up scientific discoveries, reduce redundancy of experiments, and provide a mechanism for innovation, social justice and economic growth.The institutional repository is a system for collecting and disseminating the research output of institutions.More than 500 institutions in Japan use the current WEKO2 system through a cloud service named JAIRO Cloud.
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Size matters in quantum information exchange even on the nanometer scaleQuantum information can be stored and exchanged using electron spin states.The electrons' charge can be manipulated by gate-voltage pulses, which also controls their spin.It was believed that this method can only be practical if quantum dots touch each other; if squeezed too close together the spins will react too violently, if placed too far apart the spins will interact far too slowly.This creates a dilemma, because if a quantum computer is ever going to see the light of day, we need both, fast spin exchange and enough room around quantum dots to accommodate the pulsed gate electrodes.Frederico Martins, postdoc at UNSW, Sydney, Australia, explains: "We encode quantum information in the electrons' spin states, which have the desirable property that they don't interact much with the noisy environment, making them useful as robust and long-lived quantum memories.
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Unlike conventional robot arms with their hinged and swivel joints, the flexible arms being developed by Professor Stefan Seelecke and his research group at Saarland University are constructed using 'muscles' made from shape-memory wires that have the ability to bend in almost any direction and to wind themselves around corners.The new technology can be used to build large robotic arms with the flexibility of an elephant's trunk or ultrafine tentacles for use in endoscopic operations.From the 1st to the 5th of April, the research team will be at Hannover Messe, where they will be using prototypes to demonstrate the capabilities of the shape memory arms at the Saarland Research and Innovation Stand (Hall 2, Stand B46).In contrast, an elephant's trunk or an octopus's tentacle offer far greater agility.The engineers at Saarland University have drawn inspiration from these natural models.If the current is switched off, the wire cools down and lengthens again,' explains Professor Seelecke.
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University of Warwick third year engineering undergraduates have in recent years been set the task of the examining the puzzle of why Aspen leaves quiver in the presence of a slightest breeze.University of Warwick Engineering researchers Sam Tucker Harvey, Dr Igor A. Khovanov, and Dr Petr Denissenko were inspired to look more closely at this task they were annually setting for their students and to take the phenomenon one step further.They decided to investigate whether the underlying mechanisms that produce the low wind speed quiver in Aspen leaves could efficiently and effectively generate electrical power, simply by exploiting the wind generated mechanical movement of a device modelled on the leaf.They have today 18th March 2019 published the answer to that question as a paper entitled "A Galloping Energy Harvester with Flow Attachment" in Applied Physics Letters and the answer is a resounding yes.University of Warwick PhD engineering researcher Sam Tucker Harvey, the lead author on the paper, said:"What's most appealing about this mechanism is that it provides a mechanical means of generating power without the use of bearings, which can cease to work in environments with extreme cold, heat, dust or sand.
The DLINK project, which is a collaboration between Lancaster University and Glasgow University along with major industrial partners and advisors including BT, Nokia Bell Labs, IQE, Filtronic, Optocap and Teledyne e2v, and has in the advisory board Intel, aims to provide 'fibre-in-air' communication links with unprecedented data rate and transmission distance by exploiting a thus-far unused portion of the wireless communications spectrum, called D-band.D-Band, which is the portion of spectrum between 151-174.8 GHz, is particularly relevant for 5G because, being very wide, it enables the wireless transmission of high data rates - of around 45Gb/s.The breakthrough goal of DLINK is to enable data transmission over distances of one kilometre, by a novel transmitter with excellent ability to withstand the high attenuation from rain and other atmospheric conditions that can be problematic at that portion of the spectrum.This is because wireless data demands are continuing to gather pace with widespread proliferation of Internet connected devices such as smartphones, tablet computers and laptops.The things people choose to do with their devices is also increasingly demanding - around 74 per cent of mobile data traffic will come from video streaming within five years.All of these connected devices are placing huge strains on the existing wireless communications systems, and its limited data capacity.
An EPFL study has prompted scientists to rethink a standard approach used to calculate the velocity of gas exchange between mountain streams and the atmosphere.Research conducted in streams in Vaud and Valais indicate that equations used to predict gas exchange based on data from lowland streams undershoots the actual gas exchange velocity in mountain streams on average by a factor of 100.This discovery - appearing in Nature Geoscience - will enable scientists to develop more accurate models of the role that mountain streams play in global biogeochemical fluxes.Considering that more than 30% of the Earth's surface is covered by mountains, the ramifications of this discovery are considerable.The study was conducted at EPFL's Stream Biofilm and Ecosystem Research Laboratory (SBER), within the School of Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering (ENAC).In aquatic ecosystems, such as the world's oceans, streams and lakes, numerous aquatic organisms, ranging from bacteria to fish, respire oxygen and exhale CO2.
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On 6 March 2019 at the National Library of Technology in Prague, the 4th annual international BioSpot conference was held.During the event, representatives of both domestic and foreign investors listen to presentations by researchers highlighting the most advanced and interesting technologies in the field of life sciences with potential for implementation.This year, researchers from the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland, and Germany presented 22 technologies in a number of fields, such as new precision prostate cancer diagnostics capable of preventing 90 % of unnecessary biopsies, new inhibitors for the treatment of leukemias, antimicrobial agents to combat resistant infections, or a novel technology for in vitro diagnostics at the point of care based on electronic microchips with carbon nanotubes."We founded the BioSpot platform three years ago to help the most promising projects bridge the gap between laboratories and production lines, get them on the market, and allow them to dramatically enhance our lives.And I'm very pleased when I see the increasingly strong trend among researchers in life sciences to realize the potential of these technologies," says one of the founders of the BioSpot platform, Martin Fusek of the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the Czech Academy of Sciences.It attracted far more participants than in previous years.
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The research team found that annual disinfection of parakeet nest sites prior to the breeding season, intended to reduce the spread of infectious disease in endangered parrot species, didn't have the impact conservationists expected or indeed, had hoped for, leading to recommendation for a different approach.Psittacine Beak and Feather Disease (PBFD), is a globally emerging infectious disease affecting parrot species, and researchers were looking at methods to reduce infection rates in the endangered birds.The long-term study of echo parakeets in Mauritius assessed how effective the disinfection measures were in reducing the probability of a nest becoming infected with PBFD.Project lead Deborah Fogell, a PhD student from the Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE) in Kent's School of Anthropology and Conservation (SAC) and ZSL's (Zoological Society of London) Institute of Zoology said:"The desperate need of conservationists to respond to infectious disease outbreaks in wildlife populations, especially those that are small or recovering, often means field protocols need to be implemented before critical evaluation.Our research findings will help us improve biosecurity measures implemented in Mauritius in order to better support fledging success".
This Research Topic will highlight the most recent advances and perspectives of all kinds of artificial intelligence technologies used to accelerate and improve pharmaceutical R"Artificial intelligence is rapidly propagating into life sciences resulting in a wave of academic publications in the field of AI-powered drug discovery, a plethora of startups developing new strategies and pursuing innovative business models to transform pharmaceutical research and development."The integration of machine learning with ever-more extensive biological data-sets promises to accelerate advancement in the field of human health in an unprecedented manner, not least to assist in tackling the 'failure to fail' in current drug development pipelines, previously highlighted by our Translational Pharmacology section Chief Editor Prof Alastair Stewart.We in Frontiers in Pharmacology are excited to partner with Dr. Zhavoronkov and Dr. Pei, to develop a broad-scope, open-access article collection aiming to reflect and catalyze leading-edge developments in this field globally," said Brian Boyle, Journal Development Manager, Frontiers in Pharmacology Journal.With 1.4 billion people and the government push for innovative medicines, China is expected to become the major force in the pharmaceutical industry."We are very happy to partner with the leading scientist in China and globally, Dr. Jianfeng Pei of the Peking University on this research topic and welcome scientists from all over the world to collaborate and contribute to it", said Alex Zhavoronkov, Ph.D., Founder, and CEO of Insilico Medicine, Inc.The Research Topic covers new AI algorithms and (or) applications in a wide range of areas such as drug target identification, systems biology, pharmacogenomics, network pharmacology, chemical property prediction, synthesis planning, molecular design and generation, protein-ligand interaction, drug-target interaction network, drug-related knowledge graphs, big data analysis for drug information, and image recognition.
The Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience announces the appointment of two Max Planck Society Fellows, Drs.The fellowship program is supported by Germany's Max Planck Society to promote cooperation between outstanding university professors and Max Planck Society researchers for a five-year period.The fellowship program is a longstanding hallmark of Max Planck Society collaborations, with more than 100 fellows being placed into collaborations with Max Planck Institutes around the world since the program began in 2005.Dr. Hallassa and Dr. Zuo are the first researchers to be awarded a Max Planck Society Fellowship at the Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience, which was established in 2010 as the first and only Max Planck Institute in North America.Michael Halassa is an associate investigator at the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT and an assistant professor in the department of brain and cognitive sciences.During his fellowship, he will focus on research that provides new insights into the functional organization of the neural circuits underlying higher cognitive function that will have a significant impact on the field, and may be relevant for understanding conditions such as autism and attention deficit disorder.
MySpace has apologized to users who stored music and other creative content on the social network, claiming that during a server migration large quantities of photos, videos, and music were lost.This has left many fans unable to access old bands they enjoyed and many artists who have long since moved on from their musical or other artistic endeavors.In some cases, this means that certain songs, images, and videos are lost forever.The relevance of MySpace has long since waned, but once upon a time, it was the most popular site in the U.S. with more than 100 million members.Although it lost out to new social networks like Facebook and Twitter, MySpace held millions of publicly accessible songs and other artistic content for years — even rebranding itself as a source for new music in 2013.However, this server move debacle has reportedly lead to the corruption and unavailability of more than 50 million songs, as well as untold numbers of videos and photos that were uploaded between 2003 and 2015.
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Most techniques to prevent frost and ice formation on surfaces rely heavily on heating or liquid chemicals that need to be repeatedly reapplied because they easily wash away.Even advanced anti-icing materials have problems functioning under conditions of high humidity and subzero conditions, when frost and ice formation go into overdrive.PSLs can delay ice and frost formation up to 300 times longer than state-of-the-art coatings being developed in laboratories."Ice and frost pose hazards to people and can damage machines and reduce functionality of some technologies, especially those related to energy and transportation, so we have been interested in finding possible ways to overcome their harmful effects, and phase-switching liquids are very promising candidates," said Sushant Anand, assistant professor of mechanical and industrial engineering and corresponding author of the paper.PSLs are a subset of phase change materials that have melting points higher than the freezing point of water, which is 0 degrees Celsius, meaning that they would be solids at a range of temperatures close to that at which water freezes.So, on a winter day, you could coat a surface where you don't want icing with a PSL material and it would remain there much longer than most deicing liquids, which demand frequent reapplication," said Rukmava Chatterjee, a doctoral student in the UIC College of Engineering and the first author of the paper.
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Apple’s March 25 event sports the tagline “It’s showtime,” and the gathering — which is expected to gather Hollywood executives and filmmakers in Cupertino, California, instead of the usual techies — is rumored to be the official unveiling of the company’s slate of television and movie programming.As with any Apple projects, official details regarding the programming slate have been hard to come by, but a recent — and not surprisingly, unconfirmed — report suggests that at least five projects have completed filming, with a long list of additional TV shows and feature-length movies in various stages of development or production.Although nothing is 100 percent official at this point, The New York Times reports that list of projects that have completed filming include Are You Sleeping?, a mystery starring Octavia Spencer and based on a Kathleen Barber novel about a cold case reopened by a podcasting detective; For All Mankind, a sci-fi series from Battlestar Galactica‘s Ronald D. Moore that explores what would have happened if the international space race had continued long after it did in our timeline; and Dickinson, a comedy series based on the life of poet Emily Dickinson and starring Hailee Steinfeld (True Grit) and Jane Krakowski (30 Rock).Also finished, but lacking a title, is a new comedy series from It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia duo Rob McElhenney and Charlie Day, as well as an untitled thriller from M. Night Shyamalan that stars Rupert Grint, Lauren Ambrose, and Nell Tiger Free.Apple’s slate of programming still currently in development or production also includes some high-profile projects that have been reported on in the past, but in keeping with the company’s traditional secrecy, have been kept under wraps beyond the bare minimum of confirmed details.The biggest one of the bunch — both in its A-list cast and Apple’s investment in it — is an untitled series that explores the behind-the-scenes drama of a morning TV news show, which will team Reese Witherspoon and Jennifer Aniston both in front of the camera and as producers and bring Steve Carell back to television.
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Back in December, Mercedes-AMG released pricing information for the first GT 4-Door Coupe model to hit the US market, the V8-toting GT 63.Now, we know how much the less expensive I6 variant will cost, and as it turns out, it's a fair bit less.The Mercedes-AMG GT 53 4-Door Coupe will start at $99,995, factoring in $995 for destination and delivery, when it goes on sale this spring.That price is $37,500 lower than the next available trim, the GT 63, and it's a far cry from the $159,995 GT 63 S that lives atop the lineup.Both 63 variants are already on sale.To be fair, there is a fairly large performance delta between the 53 and 63 models.
From the outside, diabetes may look like a simple condition to manage but it's actually a constant math test where the right answer is nebulous and the stakes range as high as death.But a new technology about to get broader commercial release could make insulin management the self-driving car of endocrinology.People managing diabetes today can wear a wireless stick-on sensor to track blood glucose without finger sticks, and a pump to administer insulin without an injection pen or syringe.But the person remains in the loop, between the sensor and pump, managing and authorizing insulin delivery throughout their day.Closed-loop technology mostly removes the person from the process and delivers insulin to their body in a smart, real-time trickle, with the exception of mealtimes when a manual extra dose is still required.Bigfoot Biomedical is one of several startups planning to bring this tech to a broader market in 2019.
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