the Pilots on board Lionairplanet Boeing 737 Max 8 tried desperately to understand why the plane dived down, and how they were able to stop it.But time was running out and the plane crashed in the water in Indonesia last fall.There is of an audio recording that people with transparency in the investigation of the crash taken part of, reports Reuters.the Day before the crash, which took 189 people's lives, arose a similar problem, the magazine writes Bloomberg and also refers to sources in the investigation of the crash.A third pilot, who flew with the plane in the cockpit, managed to instruct the others in the crew how they would do in order to get control of the plane again.the Day after, when it crashed, it was a new crew with other pilots on the flight.
There have been four distinct generations of the plane in the five decades years since the original 737-100 entered service in 1967.The plane we fly on today is very different in design and capability than aircraft that originally debuted.Sign up for our best stories delivered to your inboxBy clicking Sign Up, you agree to receive marketing emails from Insider Inc. and accept our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.Last week, the US Federal Aviation Administration issued an emergency order to immediately ground all Boeing 737 Max airliners flying in the US.The grounding brings fresh attention to Boeing's game-changing 737-family of narrow-body airliners.
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Airline maker accused of not realising what controversial MCAS system could doBoeing chief exec Dennis Muilenberg has repeated earlier promises that a software update for the troubled Boeing 737 Max airliners is coming "soon".In an open letter published last night Muilenberg acknowledged the "shared grief for all those in mourning" after the separate crashes of two 737 Max 8s within a few months - Ethiopian Airlines flight 302 and Lion Air flight 610."We're united with our airline customers, international regulators and government authorities in our efforts to support the most recent investigation, understand the facts of what happened and help prevent future tragedies," wrote Muilenberg.It was not until China grounded all 737 Maxes in its airspace, followed by the rest of the world's aviation regulators, that US authorities eventually acted as well.Muilenberg continued: "Soon we'll release a software update and related pilot training for the 737 MAX that will address concerns discovered in the aftermath of the Lion Air Flight 610 accident."
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Southwest Airlines will face greater logistical challenges following the grounding of Boeing 737 Max aircraft than United Airlines and American Airlines, said Henry Harteveldt, the founder of the travel research company Atmosphere Research Group.American and United use a "hub-and-spoke" model to organize their flight schedules, which means planes are more likely to return to a central hub after a given flight than in Southwest's "point-to-point" model, under which a plane is more likely to fly to multiple cities without returning to its prior location.Southwest's model gives it greater flexibility than American and United, but it makes the logistics involved in compensating for a grounded aircraft more complex, Harteveldt said.Sign up for our best stories delivered to your inboxBy clicking Sign Up, you agree to receive marketing emails from Insider Inc. and accept our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.Southwest Airlines will face greater logistical challenges following the grounding of Boeing 737 Max aircraft than United Airlines and American Airlines, the other United States airlines who use the aircraft, said Henry Harteveldt, the founder of the travel research company Atmosphere Research Group.
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On Sunday, Ethiopia's transport minister announced that information recovered from flight data recorders aboard the ill-fated Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 revealed "clear similarities" to the data from the crash of Lion Air Flight 610 off Indonesia last October.While the investigation is still underway, the flight data increases the focus on Boeing's Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS) flight software—software developed to help manage the shifted handling characteristics of the 737 MAX aircraft from other 737s.And that software, it turns out, was originally presented to the Federal Aviation Administration as much less risky than it actually was, which limited FAA oversight.Now the Transportation Department and Justice Department have launched a new investigation into how Boeing got the initial safety certification for the 737 MAX from the FAA two years ago.The Seattle Times reports that Boeing may have undersold the safety impact of the MCAS system during its 2015 safety certification review.Engineers who worked on the program told the Times' Dominic Gates that the safety analysis of MCAS presented to the FAA understated the magnitude of control adjustments the software could make.
The Seattle Times presented internal safety analysis of the 737 Max's MCAS software to Boeing and the FAA four days before the plane's second fatal crash in five months.MCAS is designed to pitch the plane's nose down if it detects a stall, but investigators think the system could be falsely triggered.Safety issues in Boeing's MCAS software — the program under scrutiny following a second 737 Max crash this month— were presented to both the company and the Federal Aviation Administration four days before the fatal Ethiopian Airlines crash last Sunday, The Seattle Times reported on Sunday.MCAS is designed to counteract the plane's tendency to tip its nose upward during flight, which increases the likelihood of a stall, by pointing the nose downward.The two crashes had "clear similarities," Ethiopia's transport minister said Monday.According to The Seattle Times, the following safety analysis was presented to both Boeing and the FAA before the crash:
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Ethiopian Transport Minister Dagmawit Moges said that black box data shows the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 jet shortly after takeoff from Addis Ababa on March 10, 2019, killing 157 people, bears close resemblances to the crash of another Boeing 737 Max 8 flying with Lion Air that was lost in October 2018 off the coast of Indonesia with 189 on board, the Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday.The paper wrote that the minister did not elaborate on the resemblance between the incidents, such as whether it involved anti-stalling software believed to be at fault in the Lion Air crash:“Clear similarities were noted between Ethiopian Air Flight 302 and Indonesian Lion Air Flight 610, which will be the subject of further study during the investigation,” Transport Minister Dagmawit Moges said.Both flights were on Boeing 737 MAX 8 aircraft.Ms. Moges declined to give details of the similarities that had been identified, including whether Boeing’s new anti-stalling software that has been associated with the Lion Air flight had been activated.She spoke after French air accident investigations bureau BEA had sent the data from both the cockpit voice recorder and the flight data recorder to Ethiopian authorities.
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Donald Trump's choice to lead the Department of Transportation, Elaine Chao, has worked hard to avoid placing regulatory barriers in the way of self-driving cars.But Chao's boss is a driverless car skeptic, Axios reports.One Axios source had a conversation with Trump in 2017 where he mentioned owning a Tesla with Autopilot technology.According to the source, Trump "was like, 'Yeah that's cool but I would never get in a self-driving car...On another occasion, Trump reportedly said, "Can you imagine, you're sitting in the back seat and all of a sudden this car is zig-zagging around the corner and you can't stop the f---ing thing?"Trump has reportedly dismissed the concept of driverless cars as "crazy," preferring a human driver to be in control of any vehicle he's riding in.
Over the next few days, we tracked how and when regulators decided to ground the 737 MAX.We covered the Thursday night unveil live, broke down all the news, and stacked the new baby SUV against its electric competition.And learn more about the Tesla Model Y, a compact SUV that could really, truly bring electrics to the masses.Oh, and by the way: How does the FAA decide whether to ground a plane?When American authorities finally decided to ground the Boeing 737 MAX on Wednesday, they got lucky—there aren’t that many in operation yet, which meant no global travel meltdown.Please observe the embodied spirit of New York City public transit: One enterprising passenger attempts to board the subway with (what appears to be) a solid steel beam.
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After two deadly crashes in five months involving its 737 Max 8 aircraft, Boeing finds itself in a precarious position.In the worst outcome for Boeing, investigators could find that the aerospace manufacturer "deliberately took shortcuts" with instruction manuals, training procedures, or anything else related to its 737 Max aircraft, and airlines could lose their trust in Boeing, said Henry Harteveldt, the founder of the travel research company Atmosphere Research Group.Sign up for our best stories delivered to your inboxBy clicking Sign Up, you agree to receive marketing emails from Insider Inc. and accept our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.The damage the crashes cause for Boeing will depend on the findings of investigators, said Henry Harteveldt, the founder of the travel research company Atmosphere Research Group."The question is, how quickly will the investigations in Indonesia and Ethiopia reveal conclusive evidence of what may have caused those accidents?"
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But to find out what actually brought down the Ethiopian jet, investigators must get to the vital data stored on the plane’s two black boxes.The first logs all the details that together provide a picture of everything the plane was doing as much as 25 hours before a crash: the positions of various switches, engine settings, airspeed, altitude, and more than 1,000 other parameters.For extra security, the boxes ride in the tail of the plane, which is less likely to be damaged in a crash than the rest of the aircraft.(The pingers helped search teams locate the two recorders that sank to the floor of the Java Sea when the Lion Air 737 crashed.)Ethiopian Flight 302 crashed on relatively flat and open terrain, so investigators found the black boxes within a day.Because special laboratory equipment is required to access their data, the boxes were sent to Paris, where France’s civil aviation investigator, the Bureau d'Enquêtes & d'Analyses, will handle them.
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Crash investigators released the first picture of the black boxes from Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET302.The photo, of the Boeing 737 Max 8 airliner's mangled flight data recorder, was published by the French government on Thursday.Flight ET302's flight data recorder and cockpit voice recorder were recovered on Monday and flown to Paris on Wednesday.Sign up for our best stories delivered to your inboxBy clicking Sign Up, you agree to receive marketing emails from Insider Inc. and accept our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.With US National Transportation Safety Board assisting in the investigation of the Renton, Washington-built plane, it was thought the black boxes would be sent to the US.
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Two angles facing left, which often indicate, "return to the beginning."The pilot said the rest of the flight was "uneventful" after the co-pilot "reprogrammed the approach."In November, a pilot reported that a 737 Max 8's autopilot system made a brief, unwanted dip.Another complaint from November mentioned a similar problem, as the aircraft dipped a few seconds after engaging the autopilot system.The captain immediately disengaged autopilot and returned the plane to its ascent."We discussed the departure at length and I reviewed in my mind our automation setup and flight profile but can't think of any reason the aircraft would pitch nose down so aggressively," the pilot wrote.
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On Wednesday, America's Federal Aviation Administration joined the rest of the world and grounded the Boeing 737 MAX 8, the airplane involved in a deadly crash in Ethiopia on Sunday, and another in Indonesia five months ago.New data and evidence led the agency to reverse course, the FAA said in the statement, including “newly refined satellite data” made available to the agency on Wednesday morning.The agency demanded all US-operated 737 MAX jets remain on the ground until further notice.Think of it like this: One aircraft typically runs three to four flights per day, depending on their length.And the 737 MAX family (which includes three near-identical airplanes, the 7, 8, and 9, differentiated by their seat configurations) only started shipping in May 2017, so 387 exist worldwide.Southwest, which has the world’s largest MAX fleet, of 34 planes, says they account for less than five percent of its more than 4,000 daily flights.
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The American FAA issued its own grounding order today, noting that, based on the wreckage and satellite-based tracking of the jet’s route, it found similarities between this crash and that of the Lion Air 737 MAX 8, which crashed in Indonesia in October, killing 189.Those similarities “warrant further investigation of the possibility of a shared cause for the two incidents that need to be better understood and addressed,” the FAA wrote.The thing is, Boeing and the FAA had already settled on a way to address the likely cause of the Lion Air crash.Boeing designed the system after discovering during flight testing that the 737 MAX engine placement—higher and farther out on the wing than on the previous generation—could pitch the plane upward in certain conditions, increasing the likelihood of a stall.When the MCAS detects the plane climbing too steeply without enough speed—a recipe for a stall—it moves the yoke forward, using the horizontal stabilizer on the tail to bring the nose of the plane down.“It’s a fancy name for what we used to call ‘a stick pusher,’” says Ross Aimer, CEO of Aero Consulting Experts, who is rated to fly every type of Boeing jet.
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America and Canada have now banned Boeing 737 Max aircraft from flying anywhere over the Great White North and the Land of the FreeTM, pending the implementation of new safety measures and training programs.This comes after several nations, from the UK to Japan, grounded the passenger jets after two Boeing 737 Max 8s crashed in the past four months, killing a total of 346 people onboard.Now, in the meantime, the US and Canada have agreed to block the troubled jets' flights out of safety concerns."Following advice from Transport Canada Civil Aviation experts, as a precautionary measure, I am issuing a safety notice to address this issue," Canada's Minister of Transport Marc Garneau said."This safety notice restricts commercial passenger flights from any air operator, both domestic and foreign, of the Boeing 737 Max 8 and 9 aircraft – from arriving, departing, or overflying Canadian airspace."Safety is a core value at Boeing for as long as we have been building airplanes; and it always will be," CEO Dan Muilenberg said.
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Boeing recommended that the Federal Aviation Administration temporarily ban its 737 Max aircraft "out of an abundance of caution," though the aerospace manufacturer says it is still confident in the aircraft's safety.President Donald Trump said on Wednesday that he is issuing an order to ground all Boeing 737 Max aircraft.The Boeing 737 Max 8 has been involved in two crashes in the past five months.Sign up for our best stories delivered to your inboxBy clicking Sign Up, you agree to receive marketing emails from Insider Inc. and accept our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy."Boeing continues to have full confidence in the safety of the 737 Max.
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The president said the FAA will make an announcement shortly.President Donald Trump on Wednesday said that all of Boeing's 737 Max planes will be grounded "effective immediately," following two deadly crashes in recent months.The president made the announcement during a White House meeting on drugs at the southern border, according to CBS News.Trump said the Federal Aviation Administration will make an announcement shortly.
Southwest Airlines is waiving fees for passengers who want to avoid flying on the Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft through Monday."We are not issuing refunds of non-refundable fares, but we are working with customers who wish to rebook their flight to another aircraft type on a case-by-case basis.As a courtesy, we will waive the fare difference for the new flight between the same city pairs," a Southwest representative told Business Insider.The move follows an Ethiopian Airlines crash on Sunday that killed all 157 people onboard, the second crash in the last five months involving a Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft.Sign up for our best stories delivered to your inboxBy clicking Sign Up, you agree to receive marketing emails from Insider Inc. and accept our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.
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The travel website Kayak will introduce a feature this week that allows users to remove specific aircraft models from their searches.Kayak and other travel websites like Priceline, Expedia, Google Flights, Travelocity, and Orbitz, allow users to see which plane a flight will use, but do not yet allow for filtering based on aircraft model.The new feature follows an Ethiopian Airlines crash on Sunday that killed all 157 people onboard, the second in the last five months involving a Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft.Sign up for our best stories delivered to your inboxBy clicking Sign Up, you agree to receive marketing emails from Insider Inc. and accept our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy."We've recently received feedback to make Kayak's filters more granular in order to exclude particular aircraft models from search queries.
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