Just had an idea for my first billion-dollar company.But for years, I considered myself a failure.No need for a storefront.A few months later, in May 2012, we raised $7M more.We stayed focused on our product.It’s going in the right direction: up.
A Google shareholder has filed a lawsuit against the company's executive officers and board of directors, alleging the company concealed sexual misconduct allegations against former executives.The lawsuit, filed by shareholder James Martin, stems from hefty severance packages Google reportedly gave executive Andy Rubin, the creator of the Android mobile operating system, and Amit Singhal, head of Google's search unit until 2016.Allegations of sexual harassment against the two men were found to be credible by company investigations, according to the lawsuit."Rubin was allowed to quietly resign by defendants Larry Page and Sergey Brin after an internal investigation found the allegations of sexual harassment by Rubin to be credible," according to the complaint, filed Thursday in California state court."While at Google, Rubin is also alleged to have engaged in human sex trafficking -- paying hundreds of thousands of dollars to women to be, in Rubin's own words, 'owned' by him."The lawsuit comes during a period of prominent figures in industries ranging from politics to entertainment being toppled by revelations of sexual harassment or sexual assault.
10
Google paid Android creator Andy Rubin $90 million after co-founder Larry Page asked for his resignation following a sexual misconduct accusation, The New York Times reported on Thursday.A Google employee had accused Rubin of coercing her into performing oral sex in a hotel room in 2013.Anonymous sources told the Times that Google investigated the claim and found it to be credible.In 2014, Rubin left the company.Since then, Google reportedly has been paying him $2 million a month for four years when it didn't have to.Google and Essential Products, a technology company founded by Rubin, didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.
Silicon Valley graduate, Getable was featured on TechCrunch this week after raising a $1.8 million round from Andreessen Horowitz, Founder Collective, Promus Ventures and Chris Sacca of Lowercase Capital.This latest investment marks the second round of funding for this San Francisco-based startup, bringing their total to $3.2 million.Originally known as Rentcycle, the company recently changed its name and its focus.What started as a mission to bring the rental industry online has since shifted to a much narrower, yet rapidly growing rental market: tools and equipment.The $32 billion construction market is expected to reach $46 billion by 2016, and beyond that should only get bigger.With the newly raised round, Getable plans to expand the team and continue building its new mobile product for contractors.
The Founder Institute, the world's largest startup accelerator, has helped launch over 130 new technology companies from its Silicon Valley chapter in less than 5 years.It has created billions of dollars in shareholder value while providing mentorship from some of the top entrepreneurs in the technology startup industry.Applications to the Silicon Valley Founder Institute, led by Founder Institute Founder & CEO Adeo Ressi, are open now.While all of the Silicon Valley Founder Institute graduates are exceptional, there are a few who stood out in 2013.In early 2013, they received $1.8 million from high-profile VCs including Andreessen Horowitz and Chris Sacca, and according to Bloomberg, are part of "The New Sexy" in mobile apps.MovieLaLa is a social networking platform that connects movie lovers and movie marketers.
A couple of years ago I attended a conference in New York organized around Twitter.There were popular Twitter users and app developers and around 300 attendees.I was about to walk into the men’s room when two guys ran out saying something like “I can’t believe that just happened!”I curiously walked in but there was nothing going on, except a guy going about his business in a stall.I said hello and asked him if he was having a good conference.I figured it would be nice to introduce them to each other so I said: “Sorry, I didn’t catch your name, but this is Chris Sacca.” They both looked at me with a bemused look on their faces until Chris said: “Uhm Boris, this is will.i.am”
The nationwide focus on sexual harassment, assault, and retaliation arguably started in Silicon Valley, with Susan J. Fowler’s account of discrimination and harassment at Uber in February.Throughout the year, accounts of misconduct were revealed at startups and venture firms, causing numerous high-profile investors and CEOs to resign.The list of disgraced tech men is long: Justin Caldbeck, Dave McClure, Mike Cagney, Chris Sacca, Marc Canter, Shervin Pishevar, Andy Rubin, Amit Singhal, Steve Jurvetson.Yet a new survey conducted by venture firm First Round Capital suggests that startup founders still have a long way to go when it comes to acknowledging and addressing the problem.The survey polled more than 800 startup founders, 17 percent of whom identified as female.Yet 19 percent of respondents said the problem of sexual harassment in tech has been overblown by the media; men were four times more likely to say this than women.
We're coming to the end of a bruising year in which scandal after scandal seemed to fly in the face of glossy efforts to create a diverse and inclusive future for the tech industry."If you build a brand on culture and it's revealed that your culture is toxic, you really do stand to take a hit," said Y-Vonne Hutchinson, founder of diversity-focused consulting firm ReadySet.In February, former Uber engineer Susan Fowler wrote a post about her experience working at Uber, which included getting propositioned by a manager.A few months later, venture capitalists including Chris Sacca and Dave McClure were outed as sexual harassers -- and even admitted to using their positions to take advantage of women founders.Last month, tech blogger and evangelist Robert Scoble responded to sexual harassment allegations with a lengthy blog post disputing the idea that sexual harassment can take place without a power imbalance.In 2015, Intel pledged $300 million to launch a broad scope of partnerships and programs to improve diversity.
We're coming to the end of a bruising year in which scandal after scandal seemed to fly in the face of glossy efforts to create a diverse and inclusive future for the tech industry."If you build a brand on culture and it's revealed that your culture is toxic, you really do stand to take a hit," said Y-Vonne Hutchinson, founder of diversity-focused consulting firm ReadySet.In February, former Uber engineer Susan Fowler wrote a post about her experience working at Uber, which included getting propositioned by a manager.A few months later, venture capitalists including Chris Sacca and Dave McClure were outed as sexual harassers -- and even admitted to using their positions to take advantage of women founders.Last month, tech blogger and evangelist Robert Scoble responded to sexual harassment allegations with a lengthy blog post disputing the idea that sexual harassment can take place without a power imbalance.In 2015, Intel pledged $300 million to launch a broad scope of partnerships and programs to improve diversity.
We're coming to the end of a bruising year in which scandal after scandal seemed to fly in the face of glossy efforts to create a diverse and inclusive future for the tech industry."If you build a brand on culture and it's revealed that your culture is toxic, you really do stand to take a hit," said Y-Vonne Hutchinson, founder of diversity-focused consulting firm ReadySet.In February, former Uber engineer Susan Fowler wrote a post about her experience working at Uber, which included getting propositioned by a manager.A few months later, venture capitalists including Chris Sacca and Dave McClure were outed as sexual harassers -- and even admitted to using their positions to take advantage of women founders.Last month, tech blogger and evangelist Robert Scoble responded to sexual harassment allegations with a lengthy blog post disputing the idea that sexual harassment can take place without a power imbalance.In 2015, Intel pledged $300 million to launch a broad scope of partnerships and programs to improve diversity.
We're coming to the end of a bruising year in which scandal after scandal seemed to fly in the face of glossy efforts to create a diverse and inclusive future for the tech industry."If you build a brand on culture and it's revealed that your culture is toxic, you really do stand to take a hit," said Y-Vonne Hutchinson, founder of diversity-focused consulting firm ReadySet.In February, former Uber engineer Susan Fowler wrote a post about her experience working at Uber, which included getting propositioned by a manager.A few months later, venture capitalists including Chris Sacca and Dave McClure were outed as sexual harassers -- and even admitted to using their positions to take advantage of women founders.Last month, tech blogger and evangelist Robert Scoble responded to sexual harassment allegations with a lengthy blog post disputing the idea that sexual harassment can take place without a power imbalance.In 2015, Intel pledged $300 million to launch a broad scope of partnerships and programs to improve diversity.
Although robo-advice will contribute to financial inclusion and helps financially less literate households to be able to invest, it is still not a replacement for financial literacy.If this sounds too simple to be true, you share the views of Chris Sacca, a well-known American start-up investor, when he first heard about the first robo-advisor proposition from Betterment back in 2010.Most investment products come with the risk of losing your money and many people may not fully understand what this entails.Back in 2008, a lot of homeowners struggled because they did not expect the value of their home (asset) to decrease so sharply that it would be worth less than the money that they borrowed in order to buy it (mortgage).As a result of these two factors, people couldn’t sell their house to repay the mortgage that they owe (because the asset is now worth less than the loan) which led to foreclosures and bankruptcies.A robo-advisor is usually digitally accessed via a website or an app because the goal is to minimise or eliminate the need for human interaction.
His appearance at Dreamforce will come just months after he was accused of touching a female entrepreneur's face without her consent.Other companies in tech and other industries have generally been distancing themselves from men who have recently been accused of inappropriate behavior toward women."Chris has acknowledged and apologized for his past actions, and while Salesforce does not condone or stand by this type of behavior, we believe that the path to real change requires transparency and multi-stakeholder dialogue, in which individuals like Chris can work to be part of the solution," the company said in the statement.Salesforce's decision to include Sacca in its program for Dreamforce comes at a time when the treatment of women in the workplace and in business situations has been increasingly in the spotlight.The move to include Sacca also comes amid — and seems to run counter to — Salesforce's efforts to portray itself as an advocate for women and as a progressive company more generally.Company CEO Marc Benioff was even awarded Variety's "EmPOWerment Award" in October for the company's focus on gender parity.
Consider that 2017 alone has involved:Former Uber employee Susan Fowler explosively alleging repeat discrimination and harassment at the ride-hailing company60 women mulling a class-action lawsuit against Google over alleged sexism and pay disparitiesA string of allegations of harassment and inappropriate behaviour by high-profile figures in venture capital investment, including Binary Capital's Justin Caldbeck, Lowercase Capital's Chris Sacca, 500 Startups' Dave McClure, and former Accel partner Fred DestinAll of this happened in the first six months of 2017.And yet engineers and venture capitalists in the tech industry continue to argue against the value of diversity, either overtly or quietly.
Silicon Valley firms are facing unprecedented scrutiny about the way they handle sexual harassment, after a slew of cases from woman claiming discriminiation, inappropriate behaviour, and even assault.In 2015, there was Ellen Pao, who launched a landmark but unsuccessful suit against her former employer, investment firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield and Byers.Earlier this year, former Uber employee Susan Fowler alleged harassment and discrimination and claimed her former manager had propositioned her.And then there were the dozen female founders and venture capital partners who came forward to allege harassment from vaunted Silicon Valley names like 500 Startups founder Dave McClure, Binary Capital cofounder Justin Caldbeck, and Lowercase Capital founder Chris Sacca.All in all, it feels like more women are speaking out about bad treatment than ever before.But these women are outliers — because most sexual harassment goes unreported.
The latest board-level spat involves an early investor, Shervin Pishevar; a shareholder, Benchmark Capital; and a board member, Arianna Huffington.Pishevar, in a letter seen by the news websites Axios and Recode, has accused Benchmark Capital of trying to oust Huffington from Uber's board.She has been on the board since April of last year and has served as a face of the company while helping to oversee an internal investigation into its culture since its CEO Travis Kalanick stepped down.Pishevar wrote: "Based on a conversation with a representative of Lowercase Capital, we have learned that Benchmark also desires to remove Arianna Huffington from the Board of Directors and have made quite derogatory remarks about her."There are several layers to this.Lowercase Capital is another early Uber investor, but Kalanick and its founder, Chris Sacca, "barely speak".
(Bloomberg) — As a spate of sexual harassment scandals rock Silicon Valley, half a world away in Bangalore startups are developing plans and strategies to avoid a similar disaster.From committing to deeper due diligence on founders to creating internal committees to handle complaints, Indian investors and entrepreneurs are pushing for greater scrutiny of the people behind up-and-coming technology companies.While Silicon Valley has long provided an inspiration to Indian startups, recent scandals that engulfed Dave McClure of 500 Startups, Chris Sacca of Lowercase Capital and Justin Caldbeck of Binary Capital are making it a cautionary tale.Travis Kalanick was forced out from Uber Technologies Inc. after a string of controversies, including allegations he failed to properly deal with sexual discrimination.Acceptable behavior and zero tolerance policies have been put in place in Ganesh’s portfolio companies.Among the behavior banned is staring, forwarding sexist jokes and calling female colleagues by names such as “sweetie” and “baby,” Ganesh said.
Technology investor Fred Destin told Business Insider he is "truly sorry," after he was accused of inappropriate behaviour towards a female founder in a Bloomberg report.He added that sexism and misogyny have "absolutely no place" in the startup and venture capital industry.Destin's comments come after an unnamed female founder told Bloomberg that he had behaved inappropriately with her during a conference party in 2013.Destin briefly referred to the incident on his own blog last month, and said he had apologised to the woman in question.He suggested she pitch to his previous employer, Atlas Ventures.He then reportedly sent her a text containing only his hotel address, and she left the conference early because she felt uncomfortable.
This time, it might just be the industry's attitude toward behavior like sexual assault and harassment.The Guardian published an article Wednesday describing a town hall meeting at car company Tesla where multiple women addressed themselves to a panel of executives and complained of being sexually harassed, passed up for promotions, and being mistreated by their male managers.It's just the latest example of a tech company facing increased scrutiny about its treatment of female employees.The Guardian story follows a New York Times report published last week detailing the experiences of women in the venture capital world dealing with sexual harassment from male investors such as early Twitter and Uber investor Chris Sacca and 500 Startups' Dave McClure.Sacca wrote an apology on Medium before the story ran.McClure wrote his own apology later, and over the weekend resigned.
Analysis Simmering anger over Silicon Valley sexism has exploded, with a slew of women going public with allegations of unwanted sexual advances at the top of the tech industry.I'm Sorry" after leaving his company 500 Startups.She then relates how she was shocked when McClure followed her into her bedroom at her apartment and propositioned her.She goes on: "The fact that I had to say no multiple times, and that he had pushed himself onto me and kissed me without my consent was way more than crossing the line of inappropriateness.In addition to McClure, Chris Sacca of Lowercase Capital, Justin Caldbeck of Binary Capital, and investor Pavel Curda were also called out for alleged inappropriate behavior.However, she claims that at a company "town hall" meeting, male executives were shocked by a string of examples of harassment provided by their female staffers.
More

Top