Sad news for those who were looking forward to the first all-female spacewalk this week — the event has been scrapped due to a lack of correctly sized spacesuits.The plan was for NASA astronauts Anne McClain and Christina Koch to take a spacewalk together outside the International Space Station to install new batteries on Friday, March 29.This would have been the second part of a mission that began last week when the first set of new batteries were successfully installed.The astronauts were required to scrap the plan and rearrange the walk, however, due to the availability of spacesuit parts.McClain had used both medium and large sizes in training, but when she was on her spacewalk last week she found that she preferred the medium size.This caused an issue as Koch also wears a size medium.
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NASA gave astronauts their first operational spacesuits in the early 1960s.New spacesuits are in development for exploring the moon, Mars, and beyond.That reality was especially clear last Friday, when astronauts Anne McClain and Nick Hague moved 300-lb batteries outside the International Space Station (ISS)."Anne had thought she could use the large and decided after her EVA that she needed the medium," Bob Jacobs, NASA's deputy associate administrator for communications, told Business Insider in a tweet.From the silvery suits of the Mercury program to future commercial and government designs, here's how astronauts' spacesuits have evolved over six decades.Each space suit had a layer of neoprene-coated nylon on the inside and aluminized nylon on the outside (to keep the suit's inner temperature as stable as possible).
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NASA announced on Monday afternoon that it had canceled a plan to have astronauts Anne McClain and Christina Koch perform the agency's first all-female spacewalk on Friday."Mission managers decided to adjust the assignments, due in part to spacesuit availability on the station," the space agency said."McClain learned during her first spacewalk that a medium-size hard upper torso—essentially the shirt of the spacesuit—fits her best.It really was a "fit" issue in regard to spacesuits.Swimming with spacemen: training for spacewalks at NASA’s giant poolNASA has four spacesuits on the International Space Station, according to Jacklyn Kagey, lead officer for the upcoming spacewalk.
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The first all-female spacewalk in history will no longer take place due to a lack of fitting spacesuits.NASA said in a statement on Monday that astronaut Anne McClain had been replaced for Friday's repair mission with Christina Hammock Koch by male astronaut Nick Hague.There's only one upper torso piece that fits Koch or Anne, the agency said, so Koch will use it.There have been more than 210 spacewalks over the space station's 18-year history, but this was due to be the first all-female, women-led spacewalk operation ever conducted.NASA has not yet planned another all-female spacewalk.Astronauts Anne McClain and Christina Hammock Koch were due to perform a spacewalk to replace some old batteries on the International Space Station (ISS).
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Earlier this month, NASA announced its plans to conduct its first ever all-women spacewalk with astronauts Christina Koch and Anne McClain.What would have been a giant leap for womankind will have to wait because of issues with women’s spacesuit sizes.Koch and McClain were scheduled to swap out batteries on the outside of the International Space Station this Friday, but NASA canceled it because there was only one medium-size torso outerwear available, and both Koch and McClain wear this size.The mission is currently set to run as planned, with astronaut Nick Hague taking McClain’s place.Some more shots of the spacewalk on Friday – was privileged to work with my friend and colleague @NASA_Astronauts @AstroHague pic.twitter.com/KueUo7HXFm— Anne McClain (@AstroAnnimal) March 25, 2019
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Poorly fitting spacesuits have forced NASA to cancel its first attempt at an all-female spacewalk.Astronauts Christina Koch and Anne McClain were due to walk around the outside of the International Space Station (ISS) on March 29, but in a press release, the space agency announced that it had changed its plans "due in part to spacesuit availability on the station".Are we getting closer to finding 'Planet Nine'?The problem involves the top part of the spacesuit."McClain learned during her first spacewalk that a medium-size hard upper torso – essentially the shirt of the spacesuit – fits her best," NASA said."Because only one medium-size torso can be made ready by Friday, March 29, Koch will wear it."
In space, no one can hear you scream... with frustrationNASA's first-of-its-kind all-women spacewalk, due to take place this week, has been scrapped, in part due to a lack of spacesuits that fit.On March 29, International Space Station 'nauts Anne McClain and Christina Koch, were to suit up and head out into the obsidian void to replace a set of batteries on the orbiting science lab.Fellow astronaut Nick Hague and McClain had popped out last week to switch out another set of power supplies.This coming Friday, McClain and Koch were going to head out together, and perform the world's first all-female spacewalk, but that pioneering moment has been called off due to a lack of equipment that fits.Instead, Koch and Hague will carry out the work.
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Plans for NASA’s upcoming spacewalk have been altered.The March 29 assignment was supposed to be the first all-female spacewalk, but there won't be enough of the correctly-sized spacesuits ready in time for Friday, so it will be performed by a man and a woman instead, a NASA press release said Monday.Anne McClain and Christina Koch, two NASA astronauts with Expedition 59, had been scheduled to operate the spacewalk, but mission managers decided to switch so that Koch and NASA astronaut Nick Hague could operate the assignment.Hague and McClain operated the first spacewalk out of a series of three on March 22.‘WONDER, AWE, EXCITEMENT’: APOLLO 16 ASTRONAUT DESCRIBES WALKING ON THE MOONThey began installing lithium-ion batteries for a pair of solar arrays on the International Space Station, according to the release.
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It's been 35 years since cosmonaut Svetlana Savitskaya became the first woman to walk in space when she stepped outside the Salyut 7 space station.We're now going to have to wait longer for the first all-female spacewalk.NASA astronauts Anne McClain and Christina Koch were originally scheduled to take a spacewalk outside the International Space Station on Friday, which would have made them the first all-female spacewalk team in history.NASA announced a change of assignments on Monday that will instead send astronaut Nick Hague out with Koch.Hague and Koch will continue work on a project to upgrade the ISS solar array battery storage system.They will swap out old nickel-hydrogen batteries with more powerful lithium-ion batteries.
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It's been 35 years since cosmonaut Svetlana Savitskaya became the first woman to walk in space when she stepped outside the Salyut 7 space station.On Friday, NASA astronauts Anne McClain and Christina Koch are scheduled to take a spacewalk outside the International Space Station.If all goes as planned, they will become the first all-female spacewalk team in history.NASA TV will kick off live coverage starting at 3:30 a.m. PT Friday.The actual spacewalk is expected to begin around 5:20 a.m. PT and will last about 6.5 hours.McClain and Koch will continue work on a project to upgrade the ISS solar array battery storage system.
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Researchers from the European Space Agency and NASA are seeking volunteers for a 60-day bed-rest study, which aims to test the effects of 'artificial gravity' as a possible solution to the negative effects of zero-gravity on the human body.Eight laid-back individuals (four male and four female), who will be confined to bed for two months at the German Aerospace Center's :envihab facility.It might sound like a dream job, but don't be too hasty – as a volunteer, you won't be allowed to sit up at all, even for meals, and must keep at least one shoulder in contact with the mattress at all times.Even worse, the top of your bed will be angled down by six degrees, so fluids move towards your head.This bed rest will have a similar effect on your body to low gravity, leading to muscle and bone atrophy.To find out whether artificial gravity could effectively prevent this, you'll be taken for a daily spin in a centrifuge, pushing the blood through your extremities.
Welcome to TechRadar's first week dedicated to space exploration.2019 is an exciting time for astronomy and space travel, with private companies pushing extraterrestrial travel to new levels, and space tourism finally becoming more than just a fantasy.All week, we'll be boldly going throughout our solar system and beyond, and showing ways you can get involved and indulge your curiosity.We'll look past Pluto and ask whether there's a Planet Nine in our solar system, explore the technology that's keeping astronauts sane on long voyages, and take a look at some audacious new ideas for space exploration.Closer to home, we'll be showing you how to take great photographs of the moon, the Milky Way and the International Space Station, and sharing our guide to the best astronomy software for surfing the stars from your desktop.Throughout the week, we'll also be keeping you up to date with all the latest news from the world of space travel and exploration.
The International Space Station (ISS) was treated to some new batteries on Friday, thanks to the NASA astronauts who took a spacewalk for nearly seven hours in order to complete the upgrades.This was the first spacewalk for both of the two astronauts, Nick Hague and Anne McClain, who are members of the Expedition 59 crew.They spent a total of six hours and 39 minutes on their mission to replace the older nickel-hydrogen batteries used for the ISS’s power system, starting at 8:01 a.m. EDT.The batteries were replaced with newer lithium-ion batteries which have improved power capacity as well as a smaller size and lighter mass.In order to perform the upgrade, adapter plates had to be installed and electrical connections for three of the six new batteries had to be hooked up.In addition to upgrading the power system, the astronauts also took the opportunity to spruce up the exterior of the space station by removing debris, securing fabric restraints, and documenting the tools available for contingency repairs.
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Boeing has delayed its first uncrewed test flight under the NASA Commercial Crew program, at least according to sources claiming to have knowledge of the matter.The delay would be the latest in a long number of setbacks impacting the space agency’s program.In contrast, competitor SpaceX successfully conducted its first uncrewed test flight in early March, putting it a full milestone ahead of Boeing.The NASA Commercial Crew program has tapped two private aerospace companies, Boeing and SpaceX, to develop crewed spacecraft systems for transporting astronauts to the International Space Station.The resulting vehicles will represent America’s return to manned spaceflight and remove its reliance on Russia’s Soyuz spacecraft.However, the program has repeatedly suffered delays, eventually prompting NASA to seek additional seats on the Russian Soyuz spacecraft to avoid a possible interruption to its ISS presence.
Two NASA astronauts are in the middle of their six-and-a-half-hour space walk right now.International Space Station astronauts Anne McClain and Nick Hague on Friday are outside the station installing a set of powerful batteries in the lab's solar power system.You can watch the spacewalk live and ask NASA questions.This is the first spacewalk of 2019.The astronauts are swapping out old nickel hydrogen batteries with new lithium ion batteries and installing battery adapter plates.The next spacewalk, which will also involve battery replacement work, is set for March 29 with NASA astronauts McClain and Christina Koch.
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Whenever astronauts or cargo are shot into space, they can bring unwitting guests along with them in the form of bacteria.For long-term projects like the International Space Station (ISS), these cosmic stowaways can create a potentially serious health hazard.Scientists aren’t entirely sure why, but they’ve noticed that bacteria tend to become more hardy and resistant to antibiotics when they enter space.A bacteria which is benign here on Earth can mutate into a drug-resistant superbug once it leaves Earth’s atmosphere.This problem is now being tackled by a team of microbiologists from Germany and Russia who have found a way to inhibit the spread of bacteria in the ISS.“Spaceflight can turn harmless bacteria into potential pathogens,” senior study author Prof. Elisabeth Grohmann of Beuth University of Applied Sciences Berlin explained in a statement.
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For years now, scientists have sounded the alarm about a potential nightmare for astronauts on the International Space Station: antibiotic-resistant superbugs that could be even more dangerous in space than they are on Earth.The ISS and other spacecraft in the future could be a great breeding ground for superbugs, for several reasons.For one, spacecraft are tight, crowded environments, where people’s microbial passengers (and those microbes’ swappable resistance genes) are constantly shared with one another.Secondly, studies have suggested that the conditions of space travel itself, such as a microgravity environment and low doses of radiation, could foster mutations in bacteria that make them more likely to become antibiotic-resistant.For instance, some bacteria in space develop thicker cell walls, which make antibiotics less effective at killing them; others can more easily bunch together into impenetrable biofilms.In either case, the greater survival rate of these bacteria may help ensure that more go on to evolve antibiotic resistance.
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One of the great fears of the medical community are so-called superbugs.A superbug is something resistant to most, or all of the antibiotics that we have at our disposal today.Researchers are trying to find ways to eliminate superbugs in an unlikely location- the ISS.You might think of space as being a sterile environment, but the inside of the ISS is not thanks to astronauts bringing bacteria and viruses with them.One real challenge for astronauts and researchers is that being in space reduces the immune system of astronauts, and provides a place perfect for bacteria to mutate into something more virulent or harder to kill.Researchers have started testing a new surface coating that helps reduce bacteria on the space station.
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Panto season comes early as the commercial threat focuses the minds of managersAs NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) continued to cry out for its own variant of the "Distracted Boyfriend" meme, Russia showed the US space agency how to do delays properly.You don't need your commercial chumsAfter NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine's surprising announcement to the effect that, hey, if you say June 2020, you've got to actually launch on June 2020 or we'll buy our rockets from someone that can, the SLS programme blinked and said "OK".If achievable, this is the preferred option for our first exploration mission that will send the @NASA_Orion capsule around the Moon.— Jim Bridenstine (@JimBridenstine) March 15, 2019
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Astronauts leave behind many things when they boldly go.These effects - and the risk of infection - grow with mission duration.Now researchers have taken another small step towards deep space exploration, by testing a new silver- and ruthenium-based antimicrobial coating aboard the International Space Station (ISS).Published in Frontiers in Microbiology, their study shows that the AGXX dramatically reduced the number of bacteria on contamination-prone surfaces - and could help protect future astronauts beyond the moon and Mars."Just as stress hormones leave astronauts vulnerable to infection, the bacteria they carry become hardier - developing thick protective coatings and resistance to antibiotics - and more vigorous, multiplying and metabolizing faster."To make matters worse, the genes responsible for these new traits can be readily shared among different species of bacteria, via direct contact or in the 'matrix' of slime they secrete - creating new bad guys, Agent Smith-style.
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