The first doodle: Burning Man 1998The concept of the Google Doodle was born on Aug. 30, 1998, when company co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin placed a simple stick-figure drawing behind the second "o" in the word Google.This first Google logo art was intended as a message to the site's users that the founders were "out of office" at the Burning Man festival.While this first doodle was a relatively simple sketch, the idea of decorating the Google logo to celebrate notable events was born -- a tradition which is today stronger than ever.As the doodles have continued to grow, new technologies have led to more complex, entertaining, and creative artistic concepts.Today, Google employs a team of illustrators and engineers known as "Doodlers" to brighten up the Google home page.
1
Some billionaires have taken to purchasing multi-million-dollar yachts, complete with movie theaters and dance floors, that they can use to host family and their other wealthy friends.The yachts of tech billionaires, like Google's Sergey Brin and Larry Page, reflect that view — their boats are decked out with amenities like gyms, spas, pools, nightclubs, and movie theaters.If you want to find out what life is like aboard these multi-million-dollar yachts, some of them are available to rent out for a few nights or weeks at a time.For instance, chartering the yacht owned by Alphabet President Sergey Brin has cost past customers $773,000 a week.Here are the yachts owned by tech billionaires:Oracle cofounder Larry Ellison owns a 288-foot yacht named Musashi that he acquired in 2013.
1
Larry Page, Google's cofounder, threatened to leave the company in 2011, Bloomberg reported Wednesday.Together with fellow cofounder Sergey Brin and top executive Eric Schmidt, Page held shares with super-voting powers that gave the threesome control over Google.Page was worried he'd lose that control if Brin or Schmidt sold their shares, according to recently unsealed court records viewed by Bloomberg.Page fretted that fellow cofounder Sergey Brin and top executive Eric Schmidt, who along with himself held shares that collectively gave the threesome control over the company, would sell their super-powered stock, Bloomberg reported.Starting in late 2010, Google's founders and board started negotiating over a plan to create a third class of stock that would help ensure that he would retain control over Google even if they did so.In June 2011, with negotiations still ongoing, Page suggested he might resign if the company's board didn't resolve the dispute to his liking, according to the court records cited by Bloomberg.
1
Lawsuit accuses Page, Brin et al of harassment cover-upGoogle co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin allegedly signed off multimillion-dollar payouts to senior execs accused of sexual misconduct, according to freshly unsealed court submissions.The complaint (10.2MB PDF), which was published by the Santa Clara Superior Court's website yesterday, was filed in a case brought by shareholder James Martin at the start of the year.The alleged misconduct has caused severe financial and reputational damage to both Google and Alphabet, it said.This revolution will not be televised – but it will be sanctioned: Googlers walk out over 'sex pest' executive scandalsThe court filing also claimed that Alphabet's board was "directly involved in and approved" this package – and that a similar approach was taken with Google's SVP for Search, Amit Singhal.
Marketers are engaged in a continuous battle to gain an edge when it comes to SEO, seeking those crucial advantages provided by top visibility where customers are looking.Multiple disciplines from technical SEO to creative content can be leveraged to win the search marketing game.In October of 2000, Larry Page laid out his ambitious vision for Google, a company he’d founded along with Sergey Brin just two years earlier.Input query and receive answers, in order of relevance.With this kind of volume, the high end of a search engine results page (SERP) is critical real estate; one study found that the top position gets one-third of all search traffic on average.We’re moving toward a more literal question/answer format with search, because while people might type a string of keywords to research a particular topic (“best answer seo strategy digital marketing”), they tend to be more colloquial when speaking to a voice-search device (“What does a best answer SEO strategy mean for digital marketers?”).
When Google bought the advertising network DoubleClick in 2007, Google founder Sergey Brin said that privacy would be the company’s “number one priority when we contemplate new kinds of advertising products.”And, for nearly a decade, Google did in fact keep DoubleClick’s massive database of web-browsing records separate by default from the names and other personally identifiable information Google has collected from Gmail and its other login accounts.But this summer, Google quietly erased that last privacy line in the sand – literally crossing out the lines in its privacy policy that promised to keep the two pots of data separate by default.Existing users were prompted to opt-in to the change this summer.The practical result of the change is that the DoubleClick ads that follow people around on the web may now be customized to them based on your name and other information Google knows about you.It also means that Google could now, if it wished to, build a complete portrait of a user by name, based on everything they write in email, every website they visit and the searches they conduct.
2
Last April, Google cofounder Sergey Brin wrote to shareholders with a warning about the potential downsides of artificial intelligence.In June, Google CEO Sundar Pichai released a set of guiding principles for its AI projects after employee protests forced him to abandon a Pentagon contract creating algorithms to interpret drone footage.As you might expect, the 30-page document Google released last week extols the power of artificial intelligence.The paper goes on to argue that the downsides of that awesome power can be avoided without additional regulation “in the vast majority of instances.”Lawmakers and governments are showing a growing interest in imposing limits on uses of AI.Charina Choi, Google’s global policy lead for emerging technologies, says one motivation of the report is to offer governments advice on where their input would be most useful.
Shareholders have filed lawsuits against Google parent company Alphabet over allegations that the company covered up claims of sexual misconduct against top executives.In two lawsuits filed this week, investors claimed that Alphabet's board failed in its duties by not tackling harassment within the company, approving large payouts and acting to conceal allegations, according to Reuters.Read more: Google can limit right to be forgotten to EUBoth lawsuits name the full board of Alphabet, which includes co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin, venture capitalist John Doerr and investor Ram Shriram.Last year, the New York Times reported that Android creator Andy Rubin received a $90m exit package in 2014, while allegations of sexual misconduct against him were covered up.The report also claimed that Google allowed a former vice president Amit Singhal to resign following claims of harassment against him, paying him millions of dollars upon his departure.
Shareholders' suit alleges there was a 'pattern'Another day, another anti-Google lawsuit – this time over claims Alphabet, adtech monolith Google's holding company, "failed to take meaningful steps to address a pervasive culture of harassment and discrimination".The case, brought by the Northern California Pipe Trades Pension Plan and Teamsters Local 272 Labor Management Pension Fund, alleges that shareholders lost value because Google was paying off senior execs accused of sexual harassment.Filed in a local court in California, the 62-page complaint (PDF) alleges that Alphabet breached its fiduciary duty to shareholders, wasted corporate assets, abused its corporate control of Google, and unjustly enriched people whom the suit-flingers claim should not have been – that is, people who quit when accused of sexual misconduct.The suit repeats claims about Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin's alleged contribution "to the perception that they don't take women seriously at work", using this as an example of how Google's corporate culture is hostile to women.It also cites how former Android gros fromage Andy Rubin walked away in 2014 with a payoff worth $90m after allegedly "berating subordinates", "keeping sex bondage videos on his work computer" and coercing a female subordinate "into performing oral sex".
In October, the New York Times published a story that several other outlets had been chasing, in some cases for years: the story of how Andy Rubin, the founder of Android, had received a $90 million payout upon leaving the company despite having a credible complaint of sexual misconduct against him from another Google employee.The story, which included several other examples of male Google executives receiving multimillion-dollar payouts after being accused of sexual harassment, sparked a furor inside the company that led to 20,000 employees walking off the job.The suit seeks three new independent directors for the Alphabet board, and an end to the dual-class voting structure of the stock — moves that would greatly diminish the power held by co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin.Melia Robinson talked to one of them:“We think Google, or Alphabet, can really do a better job of looking out for shareholders and its employees,” Julie Goldsmith Reiser, an attorney representing pension funds in the litigation.Days after Motherboard revealed the practice — and prompted US senators to to call for an investigation — AT said it would stop selling your real-time location to whoever wanted it.
Over the years, plenty of kudos have been directed at the people at the helms of big tech companies.Until recent hard times, Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, Amazon’s Jeff Bezos, Apple’s Tim Cook and Alphabet’s Sergey Brin, among others, have been fawned over by a compliant press and portrayed as visionaries and great leaders.But the world’s best tech leader hasn’t been lionized, not even now that the tech giant he has guided for almost five years remains relatively stable amid jumpy markets.He has successfully turned Microsoft from a plodding, increasingly irrelevant company into a tech powerhouse that’s surprisingly nimble and more willing to change course than its competitors.To fully recognize how much Nadella has transformed Microsoft, look back to February 2014, when he took over as CEO from Steve Ballmer.Given the pace of change in the tech world, it’s easy to forget how big a problem that was a few short years ago.
Over the years, plenty of kudos have been directed at the people at the helms of big tech companies.Until recent hard times, Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, Amazon’s Jeff Bezos, Apple’s Tim Cook and Alphabet’s Sergey Brin, among others, have been fawned over by a compliant press and portrayed as visionaries and great leaders.But the world’s best tech leader hasn’t been lionized, not even now that the tech giant he has guided for almost five years remains relatively stable amid jumpy markets.He has successfully turned Microsoft from a plodding, increasingly irrelevant company into a tech powerhouse that’s surprisingly nimble and more willing to change course than its competitors.To fully recognize how much Nadella has transformed Microsoft, look back to February 2014, when he took over as CEO from Steve Ballmer.Given the pace of change in the tech world, it’s easy to forget how big a problem that was a few short years ago.
The suit comes after Google reportedly gave generous exit packages to executives accused of sexual misconduct.Shareholders are seeking new directors for the Alphabet board, as well as an end to forced arbitrations.Shareholders have filed a lawsuit against Google’s parent company Alphabet after Google allegedly green-lit generous exit packages to executives accused of sexual misconduct.According to The Verge, citing legal filings, the suit is calling for three new, independent directors to join the parent company’s board.It’s also urging an end to so-called “dual class voting structure,” which would reduce the power of Google’s founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin.Additionally, the filing is calling for the accused executives to return their exit packages.
A Google shareholder has filed a lawsuit against the company's executive officers and board of directors, alleging the company concealed sexual misconduct allegations against former executives.The lawsuit, filed by shareholder James Martin, stems from hefty severance packages Google reportedly gave executive Andy Rubin, the creator of the Android mobile operating system, and Amit Singhal, head of Google's search unit until 2016.Allegations of sexual harassment against the two men were found to be credible by company investigations, according to the lawsuit."Rubin was allowed to quietly resign by defendants Larry Page and Sergey Brin after an internal investigation found the allegations of sexual harassment by Rubin to be credible," according to the complaint, filed Thursday in California state court."While at Google, Rubin is also alleged to have engaged in human sex trafficking -- paying hundreds of thousands of dollars to women to be, in Rubin's own words, 'owned' by him."The lawsuit comes during a period of prominent figures in industries ranging from politics to entertainment being toppled by revelations of sexual harassment or sexual assault.
10
Alphabet's board of directors are being sued over allegations of covering up company executives accused of sexual harassment or discrimination.The lawsuit, on behalf of an Alphabet shareholder, cites Android creator Andy Rubin's alleged $90 million exit package following an internal investigation into his behavior."Rubin was allowed to quietly resign by defendants Larry Page and Sergey Brin after an internal investigation found the allegations of sexual harassment by Rubin to be credible," according to the California court filing.The board members of Google-parent company Alphabet are being sued over allegations that the company routinely covered up claims of sexual harassment by executives, including Android creator Andy Rubin who received a $90 million exit package and a "hero's farewell" following an internal investigation about his behavior.The lawsuit, filed in California state court on Thursday by an Alphabet shareholder, alleges that the board of directors and top executives, including co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin, failed in their responsibility to investors by letting the harassment carry on."Alphabet's Board knew about allegations of sexual harassment by numerous high‐level executives at Google, which the Company found to be 'credible' after performing internal investigations and review, and yet failed to disclose the finding that the allegations were credible, and instead allowed the high ‐level executives to resign with lavish pay packages," the complaint says.
Shareholders today filed a lawsuit against Google parent company Alphabet, arguing that the company had breached its duty to shareholders when it approved large exit packages for former executives after determining that there were credible allegations of sexual misconduct.The suit was filed this morning in San Mateo Superior Court by Alphabet shareholder James Martin.The suit seeks three new independent directors for the Alphabet board — a move that would dilute the power held by cofounders Larry Page and Sergey Brin.It also calls for executives who received payouts to return them to the company.Google did not immediately respond to a request for comment.In October, the New York Times reported that Google had given former Android boss Andy Rubin a $90 million exit package after he was accused of sexual misconduct by another employee.
10
Google’s Larry Page and Sergey Brin created the PageRank search results algorithm in 1996.As the Web has matured, I see a shift towards the eventual creation of a more dependable and universal ratings and measurement ranking system, incorporating a dozen or more separate rating and ranking systems from both existing services and new tools that will roll out in 2019 and beyond.Such a system would likely incorporate certain signals picked up from the latest artificial intelligence, voice search, and even chatbot activity log analysis.These areas have grown at a rapid rate, as Purna Virji, Senior Manager of Global Engagement at Microsoft, has spoken about this year.— Purna Virji @purnavirji Click To TweetThe inventor of the Web, Sir Tim Berners-Lee, has shed some light on a future that I believe is likely to include a universal analytics system bigger in scope, more accurate, and more useful than any of those we already use.
6
Dragonfly, the Google project to develop a search engine that would satisfy China’s censorship requirements relies on pre-empting the appearance of search results that the Chinese authorities may find offensive.To do so, Google has used 265.com, a Chinese internet portal based in Beijing it purchased in 2008, two years before it pulled out of China, to gather user behaviour data, mainly search habits.The Google team then compare what the users would see if the same search terms were used on the uncensored Google and eliminate those sites that are blocked by China’s Great Firewall.The data is then fed into the prototype Dragonfly search engine to produce results that would be acceptable to the Chinese censorship system.Instead the engineering team is using search queries by Chinese speaking users in other markets like the US or south-eastern Asian countries, which would be very different from what the users behind the Great Firewall would be generating and therefore defeating the very purpose of a censored search engine.Though this decision may not have explicitly spelt the death penalty for Dragonfly, it is a very close one.
Google's Dragonfly project, an effort to bring a censored search engine to China, reportedly took a major blow after an internal confrontation over data privacy, according to a report Monday by The Intercept.The privacy team at Google confronted executives over data gathered from 265.com, a Beijing-based website that Google bought in 2008, according to the report.The data allowed engineers to see what search queries from mainland China might look like, so Google could improve the accuracy of the search results it might provide.But access to the data was shut down after Google's privacy team complained that it was left in the dark about the 265.com data.Shutting down access to the data has "effectively ended" the Dragonfly project, according to The Intercept.Google didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.
Toward the end of the three-and-a-half hour congressional hearing with Google CEO Sundar Pichai on Tuesday, Rep. Ted Lieu delivered a sharp rebuke of the entire reason for the hearing.Lieu was referring to previous sessions with executives from Facebook, Twitter and Google since the 2016 US election, in which big tech companies have been hauled before Congress to defend themselves against allegations of political bias.The last such hearings were with Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey and Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg in September.While Google has sent lower-tier executives to plead its case in the past -- including Chief Privacy Officer Keith Enright and YouTube Director of Public Policy Juniper Downs -- this marked the first time Google's boss appeared before legislators.Google wasn't intentionally filtering out information to suit any political agenda, Lieu argued, and there were more pressing issues at hand for one of the world's most powerful companies.Those include concerns about Google's massive data collection operations and its efforts in China, which could help an authoritarian government censor its people.
1
More

Top