Gambling games are one of the most popular games, which the players of all age groups love to enjoy at most of the times.
Welcome to CHEAP, our series about things that are good, but most of all, cheap.A phone call pretending to be someone else is a quintessential example, so is throwing toilet paper over someone’s home or car.So are the times of being surprised by who’s knocking on your door.It connects to your home‘s Wi-Fi and can stream to a device of your choice for 24 hours a day, seven days a week.The video is also in HD, meaning you can get a good look at whoever’s creeping up to your porch.The software on the Nest Hello is also pretty snazzy.
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A recent New York Times report highlighted the difficulties YouTube faces when deciding whether or not controversial content should remain on its site.A policy review meeting held to discuss "Condom Challenge" videos, displayed just how seemingly arbitrary distinctions can be, even when the company's CEO, Susan Wojcicki, is involved.While these internal debates may be the most critical part of YouTube's business for it to get right, its ability to produce clear and repeatable results at the company's massive scale may ultimately be its toughest battle yet.The videos — which make up a phenomenon called the "Condom Challenge" — show a water-filled contraceptive falling onto a person's head in slow motion.Nothing is particularly raunchy about the videos (besides knowing that condoms are being used), and they are, admittedly, fascinating to watch.The act, however, could potentially be harmful.
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In China, Huawei cybersecurity bosses vented their frustrations, while in the US, the CIA has reportedly produced evidence of Chinese Government investment in the telco vendor.According to The Times, the CIA has produced strong, but not concrete, evidence of the Chinese Government investing in Huawei.To date, Huawei has consistently defended itself, pointing to evidence it is a private company, owned by its employees with founder Ren Zhengfei being the largest shareholder with 1.14%.This position would certainly put it on stronger grounds considering many other Chinese economic champions are at least partly state-funded.That said, ‘strong’ proof might be all many nations need, evidence for this is the 5G blocks made by the US, Australia and New Zealand, three of the Five Eyes members.The UK and Canada, two important markets for Huawei, are undergoing investigations as to whether Huawei should be allowed to continue selling to their domestic telcos.
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A few months ago, as I was staring at a wretched chapter I was trying to write, I idly Googled the name “Peter Anderson” and “New Jersey.” Petey was my best friend growing up in Wellesley, Massachusetts, until he moved to New Jersey in seventh grade.Slumped in my chair, continuing to waste time, I tried his mother's name, his father's, and his brother's.There were just too many Andersons, though, and nothing of note surfaced, beyond an old article in The Times of Trenton about a murder.He was a droll kid with pale orange hair and papery skin through which you could see blue veins.He had a cheerful mother and a silent, raddle-faced alcoholic father.We dug holes in the woods behind the golf course, hoping to unearth a sack of pine tree shillings from colonial days or gold doubloons from the time when Captain Kidd (so we fantasized) sailed his ship up the Charles River.
CIA warning over Huawei – The TimesWhat happened: The Times reported on Sunday that the US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) had accused Chinese telecom giant Huawei of receiving funding from the People’s Liberation Army, China’s National Security Commission, and a third branch of the Chinese state intelligence network, citing a “UK source.” The CIA shared the claims with other members of the “Five Eyes,” an intelligence alliance comprising Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States, earlier this year.The CIA awarded a “strong but not iron-cast classification of certainty” to its finding and added that the Chinese ministry of state security had approved the funding, according to the report.Why it’s important: The latest news is the most specific to date concerning US allegations about the nature of Huawei’s relationship with the Chinese government, though the company has stressed that it is not controlled by any government agency.The allegations come as the US campaigns to persuade its allies to ban Huawei equipment from their 5G network rollouts.The US accusation was based on the assumption that Huawei would have “no choice but to comply with demands of the Chinese government,” but this time the CIA provides evidence: its funding.
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The US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) has accused Chinese tech giant Huawei of accepting funding from the “People’s Liberation Army, China’s National Security Commission and a third branch of the Chinese state intelligence network,” the Times of London reported on Saturday, citing a “UK source.”According to the Times (non-paywalled version here), the CIA presented the evidence to other members of the “Five Eyes” (signatories to the joint signals, military, and human intelligence-sharing agreement between Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the U.S., and the UK) earlier this year.The Times wrote that the CIA “awarded a strong but not iron-cast classification of certainty” to its findings, adding that a separate U.S. government source affirmed that the feds believe the Chinese ministry of state security approved funding for Huawei.While the U.S. government has long insisted Huawei poses a national security threat, has banned federal agencies from using its technology, and has reportedly been pushing allies not to let the company build out their infrastructure for next-generation 5G wireless networks, it hasn’t presented hard evidence.Some U.S. allies, particularly Germany, have seemed sceptical of the claims.Huawei has also been in the news regarding the fate of its chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou, who has been detained in Canada for possible extradition to the U.S. over claims of violations of Iran sanctions and banking fraud.
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The CIA has accused Huawei of funding from Chinese state security, The Times reported Saturday, adding to the list of security allegations dogging the embattled Chinese telecommunications giant.The CIA has warned intelligence officials that Huawei receives funding from China's National Security Commission, the People's Liberation Army and a third branch of the Chinese state intelligence network, a source in Britain told the newspaper.The US intelligence agency shared the information earlier this year with Britain, Australia, Canada and New Zealand, the newspaper reported.Huawei is the world's second-largest phone manufacturer by volume, but it has struggled to make a dent in the US, partly because of concerns expressed by the government, including the FBI, CIA, NSA, the Federal Communications Commission and House Intelligence Committee.The core issue with Huawei has been concerns over its coziness with the Chinese government and fears that its equipment could be used to spy on other countries and companies.It's the reason why the US banned companies from using Huawei networking equipment in 2012.
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A new leak claims the CIA has accused Chinese company Huawei of receiving funds from the People’s Liberation Army, China’s National Security Commission, and the nation’s state intelligence network.This allegation has reportedly been passed on to officials in the UK, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, joining past accusations directed at the Chinese company.The claims were published over the weekend by British newspaper The Times, which claims it received information about the matter from a source in the United Kingdom.According to the report, the Central Intelligence Agency provided intelligence to British officials that revealed Huawei’s alleged funding from the Chinese government.The news comes amid Huawei’s expansive supply of telecommunications equipment, particularly the hardware needed to get 5G mobile networks up and running.US officials have previously expressed concerns that Huawei’s hardware could be used for espionage, reportedly going so far as to quietly block the company’s plan to install a wireless network in the Washington Redskins stadium.
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Already under scrutiny after two deadly crashes of its 737 Max 8 aircraft, Boeing took an additional hit Saturday when a front page story in The New York Times detailed alleged negligence at a South Carolina factory that makes another of Boeing's jets.The Times report says Boeing "often valued production speed over quality" and that workers at the plant have routinely left metal shavings, tools and other potentially hazardous debris near electrical wiring in planes coming off the assembly line.The factory makes Boeing's 787 Dreamliner aircraft.Boeing has also ignored employee complaints about the issues, says the report, which relies on interviews with current and former employees, along with corporate documents, internal emails and federal records.In one instance, workers found a ladder left behind in the tail of a plane, which could have locked up the gears of the horizontal stabilizer, a former Boeing technician told the paper.Boeing didn't immediately provide CNET with a comment on the report, but a company representative told the Times that the South Carolina factory is "producing the highest levels of quality" in the company's history.
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Earlier this year, the Central Intelligence Agency informed its counterparts in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the UK that Chinese technology company Huawei has received funding from the Central National Security Commission of the Communist Party of China, the People’s Liberation Army, and a “third branch of the Chinese state intelligence network,” according to The Times.The paper cites an anonymous source in the UK that says that details were shared with “only the most senior UK officials,” which that the CIA “awarded a strong but not cast-iron classification of certainty.Huawei has consistently denied claims that it has ties to the country’s government, has said that it would “categorically refuse” any requests for data from the government, and “declined to comment on what it called unsubstantiated allegations.”The US intelligence community has been wary of Huawei, and other Chinese-based companies like ZTE, over concerns that the Chinese government has too much influence over them (Huawei’s founder Ren Zhengfei was a former member of the People’s Liberation Army), and that it could use their infrastructure for intelligence gathering purposes.Those concerns have grown as global telecommunications networks begin to transition to 5G networks — a transition that Huawei is hoping to play a big role in, especially in Europe.In recent years, US experts have raised concerns about the company’s products, while the Department of Defense has banned sales of both company’s products on military bases, and the FCC has proposed rules that would ban US telecommunications companies from using Huawei equipment.
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The CIA has told government officials in the UK and elsewhere that Chinese telecoms maker Huawei accepted funds from Chinese military and intelligence agencies, The Times reported on Saturday.The US intelligence agency alleged that Huawei accepted funds from China’s National Security Commission, the People’s Liberation Army and a third branch of the Chinese state intelligence network, the paper said.The allegations were provided to top politicians in the UK and the other ‘Five Eyes’ countries, Australia, New Zealand and Canada, earlier this year, The Times said, citing a UK source.US officials are pressuring allies to ban Huawei products from their 5G networks amidst trade tensions between the US and China, saying the kit could be used for spying.To date, only Australia and New Zealand have agreed to an outright ban, with other allies opting to monitor Chinese products to ensure they’re secure.The UK is entering the final stages of a review into the issue.
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The New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority has denied suggestions that it’s putting facial recognition cameras in the subway, saying that a trick designed to scare fare-dodgers was misinterpreted.“There is no capability to recognize or identify individuals and absolutely no plan” to do so with NYC subway cameras, says MTA spokesperson Maxwell Young.Young was responding to a photo taken in the Times Square subway station by New York Times analyst Alice Fung, which shows a prominently placed monitor with the words “RECORDING IN PROGRESS” and “Please Pay Your Fare” superimposed on a video feed.The monitor featured the name Wisenet, a security company that prominently advertises facial recognition capabilities, and the video feed traced squares around subjects’ faces.“While privacy advocates and tech giants are debating how face surveillance should be regulated, [MTA and Port Authority Bus Terminal] just put up a real-time face recognition screen in the Times Sq subway,” tweeted Natasha Singer, another Times staff member.Young says that the recordings aren’t being monitored to identify individuals in the footage, though.
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Fastly, the content delivery network that’s raised $219 million in financing from investors (according to Crunchbase), is ready for its close up in the public markets.The eight-year-old company is one of several businesses that improve the download time and delivery of different websites to internet browsers and it has just filed for an IPO.Media companies like The New York Times use Fastly to cache their homepages, media and articles on Fastly’s servers so that when somebody wants to browse the Times online, Fastly’s servers can send it directly to the browser.E-commerce companies like Stripe and Ticketmaster are also big users of the service.They appreciate Fastly because its network of servers enable faster load times — sometimes as quickly as 20 or 30 milliseconds, according to the company.True to its word, the company is hoping public markets have the appetite to feast on yet another “unicorn” business.
This week, during the times when folks in the gaming industry weren't talking about Sony's next-generation console, they were often talking about Nintendo.As we've discussed on Replay before, China has a very different videogame market than the West, with strong regulations requiring local corporate partners and lots of oversight to get videogame hardware released in the country.With Tencent's help, though, the Nintendo Switch has gotten government approval to appear in the region for the first time.No word on when, precisely, the console will hit stores in the region, but it's on the way.Nintendo Is Out of the Health Gadget BusinessFor years, one of the great mysteries of Nintendo has been the fate of their so-called "quality-of-life" technology, which was said to use their expertise (and their affinity, in the pre-Switch days, for weird peripherals) to create a series of personal health devices that would do things like monitor your sleep and provide useful information on it.
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And despite the companies own efforts at moderating its platform, it can’t seem to get its hands around the problem.A profile of the company’s CEO Susan Wojcicki published Wednesday by the New York Times captures in clear terms the extent to which the company struggles with policing the abusive, exploitative, or even moronic videos uploaded to its platform.“There’s no reason we want people putting any kind of plastic over their head,” she said, peering over the screen of her open laptop.These issues over content moderation, of course, aren’t limited to asinine challenges, and the ensuing damage control when the Google subsidiary does run into more serious issues often plays out before us in real time.The Times reported to the now infamous video by YouTuber Matt Watson that detailed a system by YouTube commenters that facilitated what he described as a “soft-core paedophile ring.”This certainly wouldn’t be the first time that YouTube has struggled with content that exploited children.
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Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai has proposed denying China Mobile USA's application to offer telecom services in the US, saying the Chinese government-owned company poses a security risk."After reviewing the evidence in this proceeding, including the input provided by other federal agencies, it is clear that China Mobile's application to provide telecommunications services in our country raises substantial and serious national security and law enforcement risks," Pai said.According to Pai's announcement, China Mobile's application sought authority "to provide international facilities-based and resale telecommunications services between the US and foreign destinations."In simpler terms, the company was seeking "a license to connect calls between the United States and other nations" and "was not seeking to provide domestic cell service and compete in the country with businesses like AT and Verizon," The New York Times wrote yesterday.An FCC official told reporters that such calls "could be intercepted for surveillance and make the domestic network vulnerable to hacking and other risks," the Times wrote.State-owned firm “subject to exploitation”
Fans are still waiting to see who will end up sitting on the Iron Throne once the dust settles, but Game of Thrones is already well on its way to reclaiming one of its most notorious titles: The most pirated television show of the year.The Game of Thrones season 8 premiere, which debuted on HBO on Sunday, was pirated 54 million times in its first 24 hours, according to a report from digital-piracy tracking firm Muso.As a point of comparison, only 17 million people watched the Game of Thrones season premiere legally, according to figures released by Nielsen.That means that pirated views dwarfed official ones three-to-one, although the official broadcasts were still popular enough to make Game of Thrones‘ season 8 launch the biggest one-day event in HBO history.About 76.6% of pirates watched Game of Thrones on unlicensed streams, while web-based downloads accounted for another 12.2%.Geographically, India was the biggest hub of illicit Game of Thrones watching, with 9.5 million views, followed by China with 5.2 million.
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American law enforcement queries of Google’s massive mobile device location tracking database, which employees call Sensorvault, has “risen sharply in the past six months,” the New York Times reported on Saturday, citing sources at the company.It’s not clear how often police ask Google to produce results from the database, which can be used to narrow down which devices were in a specified geographic location at a certain period of time (mostly phones running its Android OS, but also some ones on Apple’s iOS).The technique can be used to generate leads.But critics say it resembles a fishing expedition that raises important questions under the Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution, which restricts the scope of warrants and mandates authorities show probable cause to search, the Times wrote:The practice was first used by federal agents in 2016, according to Google employees, and first publicly reported last year in North Carolina.It has since spread to local departments across the country, including in California, Florida, Minnesota and Washington.
Indian IT outsourcing giant Wipro has confirmed its internal IT systems have been hacked, after it was reported that its servers are being used to launch attacks against it own customers.The Wipro hack was first reported by KrebsOnSecurity, who said that it had been contacted by “multiple sources”, and that Wipro had refused to respond to questions about the alleged incident.Wipro then confirmed to the India Times that it had discovered an intrusion and that it had hired an outside security firm to investigate.KrebsOnSecurity reported that it had heard independently from two trusted sources that Wipro was dealing with a multi-month intrusion from an assumed state-sponsored attacker.Both of those sources told the security website that Wipro’s systems were seen being used as jumping-off points for digital fishing expeditions targeting at least a dozen Wipro customer systems.KrebsOnSecurity had reported that Wipro was in the process of building a ‘new private email network’ after the attackers apparently compromised Wipro’s corporate email system.
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