Adroit Market Research published a study titled, “Global Thermal Interface Materials Market Size 2017 By Product (Greases & Adhesives, Elastomeric Pads, Tapes & Films, Metal-Based, and Phase Change Materials), by Application (Computer, Telecom, Automotive Electronics, Consumer Durables, Medical Devices, and Industrial Machinery), By Region and Forecast 2018 to 2025”.The report covers a detailed overview of the global thermal interface materials market based on drivers, restraints and future opportunities.Additional tools such as Porter’s Five Forces and value chain analysis are included to give a holistic view of the market.The global thermal interface materials market report also includes the prevailing trends impacting the dynamics.Furthermore, the report provides an overview of the global thermal interface materials market share in the key regions and countries.Request For Sample Thermal Interface Materials Market Report: https://www.adroitmarketresearch.com/contacts/request-sample/735The global thermal interface materials market size is projected to be worth USD 3.57 billion by 2025.The growing focus on climate change and the use of renewable energy has contributed to greater research and development in PCMs due to their ability to maintain internal temperatures without gas or fuel.
Freshwater biodiversity is rapidly declining worldwide, and nature-based solutions which increase the resilience of ecological communities are becoming increasingly important in helping communities prepare for the unavoidable effects of climate change.TalTech robotics scientists, together with their colleagues from Lisbon, studied how fish adapt to rapid changes in the surrounding freshwater environment.To conduct the study, the researchers varied the water current and depth in a simulated river with obstacles, and found that fish were able to rapidly adapt to the changes when alone and also when in groups.The results of the study are published in a prestigious scientific journal PLOS ONE in the article "Fish under pressure: Examining behavioural responses of Iberian barbel under simulated hydropeaking with instream structures".Researcher at TalTech Centre for Biorobotics and a co-author on the study Jeffrey Tuhtan said, "The findings suggest that cues initiated by obstacles in the flow can be detected by fish to find energetically-beneficial places in the flow even under extreme and rapid environmental change."The concept of observing fish in simulated rivers as individuals or in groups is not unusual, but the effects of rapid environmental variations, such as quickly changing water depths due to hydropower plant operations or a flash flood remain largely unknown.
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The first, second and third industrial revolutions all forged paths for momentous progress, driven by human ingenuity in manufacturing, science and technology.The clock is running down to the point of no return as emissions continue to rise and we witness the devastating effects of climate change on a global scale.A recent study from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change gave us just 12 years to limit global warming to moderate levels.But if we fail to accelerate sustainable production for our planet, people and communities, we may not witness a fifth industrial revolution at all.There can be little doubt that for a sustainable industrial revolution to take hold, businesses, governments and consumers need to come together.Here, the tech industry can help make a difference.
WEST HAVEN, Conn., March 18, 2019 - University of New Haven chemistry professor Chong Qiu, Ph.D., has been awarded a five-year, almost $700,000 National Science Foundation (NSF) Early Career Award for his groundbreaking research on aerosols - tiny particles suspended in the air - in the atmosphere.Qiu will use the funding to advance his research that has the potential to shape understanding of the impact of air quality on climate change, weather forecasting, and human health."National Science Foundation Early Career Awards are coveted by the very best faculty at the very best universities," said Ron Harichandran, Ph.D., dean of the University's Tagliatela College of Engineering, noting that Qiu's fellow recipients of NSF's early career award this year are professors at Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard and NYU.Qiu's research is investigating chemicals, such as amines - nitrogen-containing organic compounds that are derived from ammonia - that Qiu said were previously thought not to have a significant impact on the atmosphere."We recently discovered that reactions of amines play an important role in the formation and transformation of atmospheric aerosols," Qiu said.For the past two years, Qiu has worked with undergraduate and graduate students on this research.
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But in another, more important way, that pocket computer is a joke compared with real supercomputers — and Intel and Cray are putting together one of the biggest ever with a half-billion-dollar contract from the Department of Energy.The “Aurora” program aims to put together an “exascale” computing system for Argonne National Laboratory by 2021.The “exa” is prefix indicating bigness, in this case 1 quintillion floating point operations, or FLOPs.They’re kind of the horsepower rating of supercomputers.So despite major advances in computing efficiency going into making super powerful smartphones and desktops, we’re talking several orders of magnitude difference.(Let’s not get into GPUs, it’s complicated.)
The study also found that every time a cleantech startup licensed a technology developed by a government agency, the company secured - on average - more than double the amount of financing deals when compared to similar startups: a 155% increase one year after taking out a licence.Collaboration with universities and private firms are a familiar path for many startups, yet government partnerships are significantly undervalued when it comes to green technologies, say researchers.While the role of public-private partnerships in sectors such as biotech and IT is well known, they say that - until now - there has been a lack of data on the effectiveness of these alliances in cleantech."Our findings suggest that some of the signs commonly used to track innovation and business success, such as patents and financing, increase when new cleantech companies partner with US government departments or labs," said study co-author Laura Diaz Anadon, Professor of Climate Change Policy at the University of Cambridge.Prof Claudia Doblinger, study first author from the Technical University of Munich, said: "Government research laboratories have a major role to play in the climate challenge but also the growth of small businesses - twin objectives at the heart of many policy discussions, such as the Green New Deal in the United States."The researchers built a new dataset of 657 US cleantech startups and the more than 2,000 partnerships those companies established between 2008 and 2012, to gauge the different outcomes for private and public alliances.
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But if you’re going to lose sleep over our warming climate, you may as well do so on a sustainably sourced mattress.Several industries have long been using greenhouse gases (GHGs) in their products (they’re what gives your soda bubbles), but the concept of converting them into other products is unlocking a slew of market possibilities; acclaimed consulting firm McKinsey & Company estimates the 2030 market for carbon dioxide-based products alone will be between $800 billion and $1 trillion.Other, more eco-friendly forms of carbon capture, however, have had a harder time taking hold.Developing CCUS technologies isn’t cheap, and the built-in costs of sizeable test sites and large-scale prototyping scared off investors already concerned about what was perceived as a limited market for gases like CO2 (turning those gases into products is a much more recent innovation).Alternative methods of growth such as incubators, accelerators, and government funding were hard to come by as well, if available at all.“We can solve 90 percent of the world’s issues,” says CleanO2 CEO Jaeson Cardiff, whose company converts greenhouse emissions from commercial heating systems into hand soap and other products.
It’s been a seven-day seesaw that has seen Fox News host Tucker Carlson complain of bullying, actresses Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin indicted in a college bribery scandal, North Korea threaten to suspend talks with the US, climate change officially claim the Arctic, a terrible mass shooting in New Zealand, Paul Manafort getting an additional 43 months and then charged with 16 more crimes, Congress voting unanimously to release the Mueller report publicly only for Lindsey Graham to singlehandedly shut it down in the Senate and, of course, yet another Democratic candidate for President of the United States announce themselves.Not Everything Is an Emergency, According to the SenateWhat Happened: In a surprising twist, Republican senators decide not to toe the party line when it comes to the president declaring that his whims constitute a national emergency whenever he says so.You may also remember that Congress then voted to block the declaration, pushing the whole thing to the Republican-controlled Senate to vote on.This week, that vote finally came up in the Senate, and if the Trump administration was hoping that it would have an easy time of making sure that it went away, it was in for a rude awakening.With Democrats in the Senate minority, the bill would need some Republican support to pass; what no one had seemed to seriously consider was just how many Republicans would cross the aisle to vote against their president.
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IBM has an early lead in quantum computing, experts say, with Google, Intel, Microsoft, and a host of startups close on its heels.However, there's a big catch: Modern quantum computers are generally not as powerful or as reliable as today's existing supercomputers, and they require extremely specific environmental conditions to run, to boot.It's a major milestone for quantum computers, which had to date mostly been found in research labs.Already, IBM says, customers are lining up to figure out how to get their hands on this technology, which shows promise in fields as varied as chemistry, materials science, food production, aerospace, drug discovery, predicting the stock market and even fighting climate change."It's a little bit of a misconception that quantum physics is too much physics and too hard," Chris Monroe, CEO and co-founder of IonQ, told Business Insider.The computers we're used to represent data as a string of 1's or 0's — that's why they call it binary code.
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Steadfast pigeon defenders have something new to crow about: the oft-maligned birds may be scientists’ latest tool in combating air pollution and tracking climate change.Researchers at the University of Birmingham have developed a tiny set of sensors that can be strapped onto the backs of pigeons.Rick Thomas, the research fellow who leads the project, uses the birds to collect data on urban microclimates – the block-by-block variations in temperature, humidity and winds that affect living conditions in major cities.But drones, of course, have caused their fair share of trouble in the UK recently.The project works with local volunteers who raise homing pigeons, a variety of the common pigeon that was selectively bred for its ability to find its way home.The entire package is less than 3 per cent of the pigeon’s body weight, as is standard when fitting wild animals with scientific equipment.
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Across the planet today, in 100 countries and every state in the US, thousands upon thousands of children skipped school and took to the streets with a message for the adults: save the world you broke.The walkout was one of the biggest protests against climate change ever organized.And the organizers were children, inspired by Swedish climate activist and teenager Greta Thunberg, and led in the US by three young women, 13-year-old Alexandria Villasenor of New York City, 16-year-old Isra Hirsi of Minnesota and 12-year-old Haven Coleman of Denver, Colorado.A member of the Youth vs. Apocalypse group that confronted Senator Dianne Feinstein last month, Bruke and his friends want Pelosi to co-sponsor the Green New Deal resolution introduced by Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.I’ve gone a few nights with not a lot of sleep.During late night video meetings, Goldberg and her friends have planned the event to the last detail, calling Pelosi's office to let her staff know they’d be chanting outside her office and alerting the police that they would be taking the streets without a permit, in the grand tradition of peaceful civic action in San Francisco.
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The next time you think today's kids only care about playing video games and posting selfies on Instagram, remember the day thousands of kids around the world took to the streets to raise awareness of climate change.On Friday, students protested the lack of action from adults on environmental issues with the ClimateStrike walkouts.Many were inspired by 16-year-old Swedish activist Greta Thunberg, who was just nominated for the 2019 Nobel Peace Prize.Last year, Thunberg gave a popular TED Talk explaining why she walked out of school and organized a strike to raise awareness of global warming.She protested outside the Swedish parliament and in the process grabbed the world's attention."The climate crisis has already been solved; we already have all the facts and solutions," Thunberg said in the talk.
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From the tiny island of Vanuatu to Europe to the U.S., the climate strike movement is officially a global phenomenon.Their reasons for walking out are diverse, but the underlying theme is this: They are the first generation to grow up fully aware that they’ll suffer from climate change.“These strikes are happening today—from Washington DC to Moscow, Tromsø to Invercargill, Beirut to Jerusalem, and Shanghai to Mumbai—because politicians have failed us.”Youth climate strikes have been spreading across Europe and Australia for months as students have coalesced behind Swedish teen Greta Thunberg who began striking in front or parliament in August.But Friday marked a huge escalation with massive walkouts planned on every continent, including a solidarity strike in Antarctica.The sun rose first on Pacific where students in Australia, New Zealand, and small island nations walked out of school.
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The planet is undergoing a sixth mass extinction— the sixth time in the history of life on Earth that global fauna has experienced a major collapse in numbers.Historically, mass extinctions have been caused by catastrophic events like asteroid collisions.Upon impact, that 6-mile-wide space rock caused a tsunami in the Atlantic Ocean, along with earthquakes and landslides up and down what is now the Americas.The trend is hitting global fauna on multiple fronts, as hotter oceans, deforestation, and a climate change drive animal populations to extinction in unprecedented numbers."In 10 years you will have a quarter less, in 50 years only half left, and in 100 years you will have none," Francisco Sanchez-Bayo, a co-author of that study, told The Guardian.Earth appears to be undergoing a process of "biological annihilation."
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Greta Thunberg-the effect is spreading across the world.The day is planned klimatmanifestationer inspired by the Swedish environmental activist in over a hundred cities – and in almost as many countries.In the manifestations recorded in the almost 1 700 cities in over 100 countries around the world.But the number has grown further, according to Greta Thunberg.”the Latest update says: 2 052 places in 123 countries on all continents, including Antarctica,” she writes on Twitter.Klimatstrejken is the second greater then the collection on 30 november last year, ahead of the UN climate change conference.
The school climate strike movement that has roiled Europe and Australia for months on end is about to land on U.S. shores.A handful of climate strikers across the country have been building momentum for months, but students will be walking out of class on Friday across the U.S. to protest inaction on climate change.Why go to school when the world is burning and people are dying?Braird Kunde-Kalmus, 12 years old (and Zane’s brother): I believe I have a good childhood, but I believe if we keep going in the direction humans are continuing on, if I live long enough to have children, it’ll be drastically different.Liam Neupert, 16 years old: In Boise and the West in general, we have this dynamic where you can live in a big city and there’s still so much nature surrounding you.Grace: The environment in general has always been a big thing in my life, but climate change itself probably became a big thing for me a couple of years ago as all of these reports came out on it.
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It sounds like the ultimate tongue-in-cheek sales pitch to target millenials: An environmentally friendly streaming music service that pays artists in Bitcoin, and plants trees in exchange for streams from customers.All you need are references to vaping and craft ale, and you’d have a comprehensive 20-something hipster bingo card.In fact, it’s a serious new venture by streaming music upstart Feedbands that targets indie musicians.In an attention-grabbing effort to carve out a niche in the shadow of giants like Spotify and Apple Music, it’s come up with a musician-friendly way to generate streaming royalties that are beneficial to artists and listeners alike — while maybe even helping save the planet in the process.“What we are trying to do is turn music streaming into something that directly fights climate change,” Graham Langdon, founder and CEO of Feedbands, told Digital Trends.“Our new platform plants one tree for every 100 qualified streams.
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New York City mayor Bill de Blasio announced a huge climate-focused infrastructure effort on Thursday, calling for a project that could, among other things, extend lower Manhattan two blocks into the East River and cost as much as $10 billion.Sea level rise due to climate change has long been a cause of concern for New York City.According to the Lower Manhattan Coastal Resilience survey, released today, 37 percent of lower Manhattan will be at risk for storm surges by 2050.“We don’t debate global warming in New York City.— Mayor Bill de Blasio (@NYCMayor) March 14, 2019The plan also includes more projects costing around $500 million, which would include resiliency measures like elevating parks and building removable flood barriers in lower Manhattan that can be used when a storm approaches.
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Scientists observed waterfalls forming simply through the movement of water downhill in a new laboratory study – a result that could complicate our understanding of Earth’s history.Waterfalls may be beautiful and awe inspiring, but they’re also windows into the past, signaling changes in sea level, tectonic activity, or climate change.But if waterfalls can form without an external force, as they did in this new experiment, scientists might have to rethink inferences they’ve made about Earth using waterfalls.“There’s this idea that we can look at the topography of a planetary body and use it as a record of its history,” study author Joel Scheingross, assistant professor in the Department of Geological Sciences and Engineering at the University of Nevada, Reno, told Gizmodo.A combination of various past influences can form a waterfall, including faults that cross rivers moving over time, landslides or glaciers altering the shape of the land, and climate change influencing the rate that rivers cut into the Earth.The researchers modelled a riverbed in the lab using a 24-foot-long, 1-foot-wide piece of polyurethane foam meant to simulate bedrock.
Depending on where you live, winter can either be a time to escape the heat for a bit or a sad string of months spent buried in snow with bitter cold.If you are in Australia, a new tool created by Dr. Geoff Hinchliffe and Associate Prof. Mitchel Whitelaw from the School of Art & Design with help from the ANU Climate Change Institute predicts you may only have a few more decades to worry about winter.According to the tool, there will be no more winter in Australia by 2050.The tool the researchers created visualizes data, and the tool claims that by 2050 winter as Aussies know it will no longer happen.Instead, in the former winter months, the scientists say Australians will deal with a new season called “New Summer.” The New Summer season is described as a period of the year where temperatures consistently peak in some cases at above 40-degrees Celsius (over 100 degrees Fahrenheit) for a sustained period.Hinchliffe says that in 30 years time winter as we know it will be “non-existent” going on to say that winter will cease to be everywhere but a few places in Tasmania.
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