A large Norwegian manufacturing firm has had to close its website and IT operations and go old school by resorting to manual processes for its factories.It comes after a devastating ransomware attack crippled Norsk Hydro, one of the world’s largest producers of aluminium.As of Wednesday afternoon, its website was still offline, and the firm has been forced to use Facebook to provide updates to the world.The firm confirmed via Facebook that it had suffered an “extensive cyber-attack that hit on Tuesday.”“Hydro’s technical team, with external support, has succeeded in detecting the root cause of the problems and is currently working to validate the plan and process to restart the company’s IT systems in a safe and sound manner,” said the firm.“However, it is still not clear how long it might take restore stable IT operations.”
This chasm also is the reason why researchers frequently face problems in their efforts to model pathogenic diseases in animal models, such as mice, and why drugs developed using this approach often fail in humans.A striking example of species-specific differences in tolerance to infection can be seen in the response to enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) bacteria, which are responsible for more than 100,000 infections per year alone in the U.S., and the cause of bloody diarrhea (travel diarrhea), colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) - a serious condition that induces kidneys to fail after they encounter EHEC's Shiga toxin.For years it has been known that it takes 100,000-fold higher numbers of pathogenic EHEC bacteria to infect mice compared to humans, and that mice don't develop symptoms of the disease unless the animals are grown under special germ-free conditions in which they lack a normal commensal gut microbiome.A multi-disciplinary team of biological engineers, microbiologists, and systems biologists at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering working on the Institute's DARPA-supported "Technologies for Host Resilience" (THoR) Project, whose goal it is to uncover the causes of tolerance to infection exhibited by certain individuals or species, has now succeeded in modeling infection of human colon with EHEC in vitro using a microfluidic Organ-on-a-Chip (Organ Chip) culture device.They found that four metabolites that are produced at higher levels by the human gut microbiome can help explain the enhanced sensitivity of human colon towards EHEC.Ingber is also the Judah Folkman Professor of Vascular Biology at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and the Vascular Biology Program at Boston Children's Hospital, as well as Professor of Bioengineering at Harvard's John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.
However, despite its promises, nanotechnology still seems to be stuck in the status of an emerging science," contend Assistant Professor Raphael Zingg of Waseda University and Dr. Marius Fischer of the Max Planck Institute for Innovation and Competition.With their work published in Nano Today on February 22, 2019, they aim at shedding light on the issue of technology transfer; how can the knowledge developed by universities be transferred to private entities that will develop commercial products.Their findings showed that patents filed jointly by private and public organizations are on the rise, albeit on a small level."While research institutions still develop the majority of their patents independently, our data fleshes out promising signs that private-public knowledge transfer is coming to fruition.The two researchers found that though the number of nanotechnology patents filed jointly by private firms and research institutions may still be low in absolute terms, a sharp increase has occurred since the year 2000, and that in the most recent years, 8% of all patents have been filed jointly by private-public partners.Additionally, they pointed out that private-public patent applications were filed with more patent offices than independently-developed public ones, and Prof. Zingg suggests that such willingness to obtain a wider geographical protection and to invest in patenting strategies imply high internal valuation.
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Logowatch Now that star-crossed Hadoop-flinging lovers Cloudera and Hortonworks have ended their years-long competition-cum-courtship with a merger, what better way to seal the deal than visiting the Strategy Boutique?As with so many relationships, the on-again-off-again romance has culminated in a union that made one partner take the other's name.But, in recognition of the merger, the top brass at the all-new Cloudera (many of whom are Clouderans) have decided the least they could do is summon up a rebrand for the duo – and we were given a sneak peek this week.You might have thought the marketeers at the boutique would want to work a nod to Hortonworks into the new logo – perhaps an elephant's trunk used as a letter?Elephants, representing Hadoop, are old hat for a firm selling itself as the "enterprise data cloud".In fact, the crack team decided to hit capslock, shifting lower-case cloudera into upper-case CLOUDERA.
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For the uninitiated, Smash Bros. pits Nintendo icons -- Mario, Link, Kirby -- against an all-star cast of video game characters in explosive free-for-all battles.It's something of a revelation in Nintendo's typically kid-friendly lineup of games, where instead of seeing characters politely race each other, or compete in friendly games of tennis, they punch each other in the face.And Ultimate is the quintessential version of Smash, cramming almost everything from the franchise's 20-year history into one tidy package.Because Smash Bros. is an anachronism so firmly rooted in the past it will never be able to take full advantage of the Switch's best asset: Its portability.First, a little context: In 2002, I was a chubby kid that bailed on after-school socializing for Super Smash Bros. Melee, on the Nintendo GameCube.Basically, if it was legal for a 12-year-old to get a forehead tattoo, I would have plastered the game's logo smack in the middle of my brow.
A batch of German toilet roll rejected by the Queen – or the Queen's official toilet roll softness tester at least – has found a welcoming home in the cubicles of a school.It was the result of a stunt gone wrong, in which German tissue manufacturer Hakle decided it would be a laugh to send the Queen a pallet load of its most luxurious toilet paper in case the UK suffers national shortages should some from of hard, non-quilted Brexit lumber across the finishing line next week, and leave the shop shelves looted of life's essentials.Obviously you can't just send pallet loads of any old crap to the Queen and offload it outside Buckingham Palace and expect a thank you letter and an honorary knighthood, as royal household staff refused the delivery on security grounds.It is the Queen's bottom, after all.Hence the German loo roll has been dumped off to Woodcote High School, which now has more than 1,000 very nice four-ply toilet rolls.No one tell the local council or it'll have its budgets slashed accordingly.
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It’s fair to say that battle royale games have seen phenomenal success in recent times, with massed ranks of players clamouring to face-off against each other in combat across various big-name titles.It’s a genre of online games which blend survival and combat, with a whole load of players dropped into a large level.The concept wasn’t invented by video game developers, however, and actually originated in the Japanese film released way back in 2000 called ‘Battle Royale’ (strangely enough).The movie envisaged a dystopian future where the government quells the rebellious youth by forcing middle school students to fight to death on an island until only one victor remains.If this sounds like The Hunger Games, apparently any similarity between these later books and films is purely coincidental (ahem).This essentially recreated the movie, with a central cache of goodies everyone starts in a circle around, giving players the choice of staying to fight over that stuff, or more prudently running away to locate chests and other loot in the further reaches of the map.
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JD.com is seeing a round of shake-ups on its management team.Long Yu, the company’s legal head, announced her resignation on her WeChat Moments on Wednesday, the second key executive departing from the company in a matter of days, reported Chinese media Jiemian.Long cited family reasons for her departure, saying that she hopes to spend more time with her daughter who is in college, Jiemian quoted her as saying.Long joined JD.com in 2012 as head of human resources and general counsel, and is known for her role in establishing and running the company’s talent system.The Chinese e-commerce giant has ballooned to nearly 180,000 employees, according to Jiemian, from 8,000 in 2012.A former executive at the Hong Kong-based telecommunications company Utstarcom, Long met JD.com founder Richard Liu during her EMBA studies at China Europe International Business School (CEIBS) in 2009.
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With fluctuating market conditions and the unpredictability of doing business in today’s global economy, combined with unprecedented speeds in technical innovation, organisations have to move faster than ever before.This has left traditional approaches to executing ideas no longer fit for purpose.As the report outlines, to bridge that gap organisations need to finely tune their focus on putting the right people, process and technology into play and creating the right conditions for them to succeed.It’s creating, fostering and enabling an environment where individuals feel empowered to come up with ideas themselves, rather than assume it’s someone else’s job.It is ‘sign up and go’ simple.This is exactly why Amadeus, a provider of advanced technology solutions for the global travel industry, is using cloud - to help speed application development lifecycles to realize and respond to new business opportunities rapidly.
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Under Armour is an iconic brand that has built a well-deserved reputation for high-quality athletic wear.Yet this maker also offers a lot of great casual clothing, backpacks, and accessories suitable for everyday use, whether you’re heading to the gym or just getting ready for a regular day of work or school.If you’ve been hunting around for a good waterproof backpack to carry your laptop and other items (and keep them dry and out of the rain) then Under Armour’s ongoing sale might have just what you’re looking for.And if you’re planning on spending $100 or more at the outlet store, you can save an additional 20 percent off your order with code SPRING20.It’s got a sleek design with four zippered compartments for your laptop, clothes, shoes, chargers, and other stuff, along with elastic side pockets for things like water bottles.This waterproof backpack is available in a wide range of colors, too, and is currently on sale from Under Armour for just $42 (saving you $13).
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Semen frozen back in 1968 has been used to impregnate dozens of Merino ewes, resulting in healthy lambs.The Australian scientists who made it happen say it’s the oldest sperm ever used to produce offspring.A research team led by Simon de Graaf from the Sydney Institute of Agriculture and School of Life and Environmental Sciences impregnated 34 Merino ewes with the thawed out 50-year-old ram sperm, according to a University of Sydney press release.In 1968, veterinary scientist Steven Salamon froze pellets of the Merino sheep sperm using liquid nitrogen, which he did to test the long-term viability of semen cryopreservation.This latest experiment suggests sperm can remain frozen for at least 50 years to no discernible ill effect.The news bodes well for not just veterinary scientists, but also individuals at risk of losing their fertility, such as males undergoing chemotherapy for cancer.
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It's 20th Century Fox's first day at school under new headmaster Disney.The Mouse House will officially acquire the iconic studios at the very specific time of 12:02 a.m.And Deadpool is heralding that with his first school picture.The Merc With a Mouth, aka Ryan Reynolds, posted the below picture on Twitter with the line: "Feels like the first day of 'Pool."The unconventional Marvel superhero, whose home at Fox saw two R-rated films as well as a PG-rated version of Deadpool 2, seems remarkably chipper under his new clean-as-a-whistle corporate overlords, and that's probably because Disney has a history of allowing the companies it owns to produce R-rated films.Shortly after Miramax was acquired by Disney in the '90s, the Bob and Harvey Weinstein-founded company came out with the R-rated Pulp Fiction.
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A team of researchers including Northwestern Engineering faculty has expanded the understanding of how virus shells self-assemble, an important step toward developing techniques that use viruses as vehicles to deliver targeted drugs and therapeutics throughout the body.By performing multiple amino acid substitutions, the researchers discovered instances of epistasis, a phenomenon in which two changes produce a behavior different from the behavior that each change causes individually."We found occurrences where two separate single amino acid changes caused the virus shell to break or become really unstable, but making both changes together produced a stable structure that functioned better than ever," said Danielle Tullman-Ercek, associate professor of chemical and biological engineering at the McCormick School of Engineering.The paper titled "Experimental Evaluation of Coevolution in a Self-Assembling Particle," was published the March 19 print issue of Biochemistry.Tullman-Ercek served as the paper's co-corresponding author along with collaborator Matthew Francis, professor of chemistry at the University of California at Berkeley.The work builds on past research in which Tullman-Ercek and collaborators developed a new technique, called SyMAPS (Systematic Mutation and Assembled Particle Selection), to test variations of a protein used by a bacterial virus called the MS2 bacteriophage.
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The University of Minnesota announced today that it will lead a $9.7 million grant over the next five years from the National Institutes for Health (NIH) BRAIN Initiative to develop a new implantable device and surgical procedure with the goal of restoring more natural hearing to people who are deaf or severely hard-of-hearing.The device consists of an electrode array that is implanted in the bony, snail-shaped structure in the ear, called the cochlea, to stimulate the auditory nerve that projects to the brain.According to the National Institutes on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, the number of people who use cochlear implants keeps growing.In the United States, more than 96,000 people have cochlear implants, which includes about 38,000 children.Cochlear implants have been proven to be an effective treatment option in many people with hearing loss caused by a lesion or disease of the inner ear or the auditory nerve.In addition, cochlear implants are positioned within the cochlea and transmit electrical current across the bony cochlear wall to reach the auditory nerve.
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Lab-based study lays groundwork for inexpensive, wearable therapyOnly 30 percent of stroke survivors continue rehabilitation therapy after the first month due to cost, proximity to therapistParticipants increased arm mobility, reduced arm stiffnessEarly version of device now being used at home by study patientsCHICAGO --- Severely impaired stroke survivors are regaining function in their arms after sometimes decades of immobility, thanks to a new video game-led training device invented by Northwestern Medicine scientists.Most participants retained their arm function a month after finishing the training.
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The announcement was made today at Haimo Primary School in Greenwich by the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, who is funding the study.Led by Dr Ben Barratt from the Environmental Research Group at King's, the study will use state-of-the-art toxic air monitoring backpacks developed by Dyson, to help monitor and better understand the levels of toxic air young Londoners are exposed to during their journeys to school and in the classroom.250 pupils from five London primary schools, situated across five boroughs (Southwark, Richmond, Greenwich, Haringey and Hammersmith and Fulham) will take part in the project, wearing specially adapted backpacks to and from school for a week.Weighing just over 1kg, the sensors fit into lightweight bags and measure particulate matter (PM2.5 and PM10) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) levels.They will also be able to the compare the exposure of children who have similar journeys but take different routes and travel modes and then make recommendations of how children can reduce their exposure in future.Low lung function in childhood can persist into adulthood and is often associated with other health problems including chronic obstructive lung disease in later life.
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Scholars from the Higher School Of Economics have developed an algorithm that detects emotions in a group of people on a low-quality video.The solution provides a final decision in just one hundredth of a second, which is faster than any other existing algorithms with similar accuracy.The results have been described in the paper 'Emotion Recognition of a Group of People in Video Analytics Using Deep Off-the-Shelf Image Embeddings.'Analysing people's social behaviour with the use of images and videos is one of the most popular tasks for developers of smart man-machine interfaces.Researchers have achieved a rather high quality in group-level emotion recognition, but it remained impossible to implement this development on a mass scale.The problem was the requirement of most video systems for images containing face close-ups in good resolution.
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Amazon Amplify contains a series of initiatives aimed at increasing the number of women working in the technology sector.Under the new initiatives by the Seattle-based technology giant, female students will be able to apply for a bursary of over £130,000 a year to help them move forward with a career in technology and innovation.Amazon has said that up to 24 female students will be awarded the Bursary.Fiona McDonnell Director of Consumer Retail at Amazon commented in a release that: “Diversity fosters greater innovation and helps raise the bar for customers, and having a diverse workforce is also just the right thing to do.Our new Amazon Amplify plan aims to attract and retain the best and brightest talent in Britain, ensuring a positive environment in which they can thrive.”A key part of the Amplify platform is educational support, this comes in a few forms first they are running the Amazon degree apprenticeship programme which aims to help people from all types of backgrounds and ethnicities train to be engineers and managers.
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The ecological bio-production of xylitol and cellulose nanofibers using modified yeast cells, from material produced by the paper industry has been achieved by a Japanese research team.The research was carried out by a group led by Assistant Professor Gregory Guirimand-Tanaka, Professor Tomohisa Hasunuma and Professor Akihiko Kondo from the Graduate School of Science, Technology and Innovation and the Engineering Biology Research Center of Kobe University.In his effort to develop innovative processes to achieve a sustainable society, Professor Kondo has focused on a variety of bio-compounds such as xylitol, a highly valuable commodity chemical, which is widely used in both the food and pharmaceutical industries (for example, as a sugar substitute in chewing gum).Professor Kondo's group is also interested in innovative nanomaterials such as cellulose nanofibers, which present huge economic potential due to the properties of nanocellulose (mechanical properties, film-forming properties, viscosity etc.The industrial production of xylitol and cellulose nanofibers from purified D-xylose and cellulose fibers respectively involve costly and polluting processes.In order to solve these issues and realize a sustainable and environmentally-conscious society, we must make use of renewable biomass such as paper paste (Kraft pulp) and develop innovative processes.
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A team of worldwide researchers including engineers from the University of Utah have received a $9.7-million grant to design and develop a new implantable device and surgical procedure for the deaf that hopefully will cut through the noise and produce much more detailed sound than traditional hearing-loss treatments.This new procedure involves the use of a new version of the Utah Electrode Array architecture, a brain-computer interfacbrae originally developed by University of Utah biomedical engineering Professor Emeritus Richard Normann that can send and receive electrical impulses from the brain.Versions of the Utah Electrode Array are being further developed to allow amputees to move prosthetic limbs with their mind and, in this case, to hear higher-resolution sounds than with regular cochlear implants.Since the mid-1980s, cochlear implants have been used to treat hundreds of thousands of deaf patients.It uses a tiny device implanted in the cochlea -- a spiral cavity of the inner ear that produces nerve impulses from sound vibrations -- to stimulate the auditory nerve.And for those in which it does work, the sounds they hear may not be detailed, preventing them from distinguishing music or understanding voices in a noisy room, for example.
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