A view of Romania's first bitcoin ATM is seen in downtown Bucharest June 27, 2014.Central banks around the world have been looking at how they might introduce or use national cryptocurrencies.Thomas Moser, an alternate member of the Swiss National Bank's governing board, told Business Insider that central banks have become "sceptical" of introducing national digital currencies after initial interest.Moser says bankers are wary of the new economic risks or knock-on effects introducing a national cryptocurrency might have.ZUG, SWITZERLAND — Countries are unlikely to introduce national cryptocurrencies any time soon, according to a senior Swiss central banker.Thomas Moser, an alternate member of the Swiss National Bank's governing board, told Business Insider that central banks around the world have become "sceptical" of introducing national digital currencies after initial interest.
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After becoming one of the first phone makers to adopt the 18:9 aspect ratio, Samsung seems to be gearing up for another take at innovation.A patent from 2016 details a chin-less smartphone, something only Apple has managed to do so far.The patent does not speak volumes about the complete design but it does of the front of the phone.The images resemble the structure of a Galaxy Note device, with a boxy front and curved edges.The chin is absent and there are barely any bezels on the sides.The only significant amount of bezel is held by the top, with enough space for the earpiece and the proximity sensor.
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Marc Pritchard, who oversees marketing for the world's biggest advertiser, Procter & Gamble, has been on a crusade to clean up digital advertising.His next mission is to get the so-called walled gardens — Facebook and Google — to bend on sharing their data with advertisers.And he thinks he's got a good shot.Marc Pritchard, the chief brand officer for Procter & Gamble, has spent the past few years on a crusade to clean up digital advertising.In a sit-down with Business Insider at the Cannes ad festival, Pritchard said he was feeling better about P's digital advertising output, citing strides the industry had made in sniffing out fraudulent ads and making sure brands pay only for ads people can see.Facebook and Google have massive data assets that power their businesses
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Asus’ Chromebook C223 might have leaked through a Norwegian retailer.Even though availability and pricing are unknown, the Chromebook C223 might be a low-end Chromebook.Even though Asus is best known for its smartphones and Windows-powered computers, the company also cranks out Chromebooks from time to time.The Chromebook C223 looks to be Asus’ next Chrome OS machine that leaked through Norwegian retailer Power.According to the listing, the Chromebook C223 sports an 11.6-inch display with a 1,366 x 768 resolution, dual-core Intel Celeron N3350 “Apollo Lake” processor, 4GB of RAM, and 32GB of storage.The display does not double as a touchscreen, though the processor choice means the machine does not include fans.
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Panasonic announced the Toughbook FZ-T1, its latest rugged device.The Toughbook FZ-T1 is not a smartphone, though there is a version with 4G.The Wi-Fi-only and 4G versions will launch in August and September, respectively.Panasonic’s Toughbook devices might not be the cheapest around, but they tend to be rugged enough for a variety of work environments.The Toughbook FZ-T1 looks to continue its predecessors’ ruggedness and do so in a smaller form factor.The Toughbook FZ-T1 might look like a smartphone, but Panasonic refers to it as a “handheld.” The device comes in two flavors: one with only Wi-Fi and another with Wi-Fi and 4G.
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Diving: It's not just limited to swimming pools and ocean cliffs.On the way to the victory, Neymar, barely touched by defenders, flopped on his back as if to hint the refs should call a foul.The referee went along with Neymar at first, but consulted the tournament's controversial new video assistant referee system and changed his mind.Some loved it, others thought it was disrespectful, generally depending on whether they were rooting for or against Brazil.Said one Twitter user: "(I) would like to retract my tweet from a week-and-a-half ago promising pints or something if there was a rainbow flick at the World Cup."Another pointed out, "Hey guys, he lost the ball here, just thought I'd let you know."
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The incredibly beautiful 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO that you see in the image below is an incredibly rare car.Only a handful were made between 1962 and 1964 and perhaps surprisingly considering many were racing cars, all the cars built have survived.The most expensive ever sold was a 1963 model that fetched $70 million.Another is going up for auction and this one is a 1962 250 GTO and the pre-auction estimate for its sales price is over $45 million.The car is 250 GTO chassis number 3413GT and was originally a works car that was tested by American racing driver Phil Hill at the 1962 Targa Florio road race.This car was the third built in a 36-unit run and won numerous races when owned by the cars first private owner, Edoardo Lualdi-Gabardi.
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In a colossal victory for privacy advocates, the Supreme Court ruled today in favor of requiring law enforcement to have a warrant before accessing mobile phone location data from telecom providers.The decision today was actually a reversal of a previous ruling from two lower courts.In a string of Radio Shack robberies, courts convicted Timothy Carpenter of the crime based on evidence obtained from is cellular provider.Investigators managed to secure 12,898 location points that helped to track Carpenter over 127 days, putting him near four of the robbery locations.All of the data was obtained from the cellular provider with a court order, not a warrant, which is harder to secure in these types of cases due to the evidence required to obtain one.Chief Justice John Roberts delivered the opinion of the court, after a 5-4 split in favor of the warrant requirement.
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Aptiv’s nuTonomy has been given permission to operate self-driving cars on the city’s public roads.The approval follows more than a year of testing within Boston’s Seaport District; the new approval covers the entire city.This makes Aptiv the first self-driving car company to be given city-wide testing authorization.Aptiv doesn’t shy away from pointing out that nuTonomy, which it acquired last year, has an “exceptional” safety record.That fact coupled with the company’s long relationship with Boston helped paved the way for the new approval.Under it, Aptiv’s autonomous vehicles — which are already giving public rides in Las Vegas — will now be found on any give public street across the city.
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At least 5,000 a week, and, ideally, making money while doing it.So in the past month, Tesla did what it has always done, whether in a pinch or not—it got flexible.To augment the two Model 3 assembly lines already running inside his at-capacity factory in Fremont, California, Musk set up a third line.A new building was impossible, so we built a giant tent in 2 weeks,” he Tweeted last weekend.And it’s way better than the other GA [general assembly] line that cost hundreds of millions!”Musk didn’t say how many cars are being built in the tent, how that work differs from the assembly inside the factory, or what makes this setup any better.
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California may still get its super strong net neutrality protections after all, as Democrats in the state legislature agree to head back to the negotiating table, after key provisions of the bill were cut during a committee hearing this week.On Friday, the bill's author, state Sen. Scott Wiener, a Democrat from San Francisco, said he and fellow Democrat, Assemblyman Miguel Santiago, the chair of the committee, will begin negotiating next week to fix the bill to ensure the protections that were weeded out in the committee process are added back into the legislation."But as I've made clear in the past, there are some protections that must be in the bill.Santiago confirmed he is working with Wiener on a compromise, but fell short of promising he'd rollback his amendments.The news comes as the California legislation, which was heralded as one of the nation's most aggressive efforts to revive Obama-era net neutrality regulations reversed by the Trump Administration, were watered down during a tense legislative hearing Wednesday.Following the vote, Wiener said the hostile amendments added at the last minute by Santiago and passed before the hearing even began "eviscerate the bill and leave us with a net neutrality bill in name only."
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Apple has finally admitted the utterfly-mechanism keyoards in its Macook ad Macook Pro laptops are diaolical, and has offered free repairs and replacemets.It's funy what tens of thousads of complaints and a lawsuit will do.These minimalist noteook keyoards, asically, are terrile: the key tops fall off, ad they ecome unresponsive when you push down o them or simple not work at all after a few weeks or moths of use.They are a slimmed down vesion of Apple's scissor-style keyoards, with reduced travel."Apple has determined that a small percentage of the keyboards in certain MacBook and MacBook Pro models may exhibit one or more of the following behaviors," the Cupertino idiot-tax giant said on Friday this week, admitting "letters or characters repeat unexpectedly," "letters or characters do not appear," and "key(s) feel 'sticky' or do not respond in a consistent manner."If you have one of the followig models, you can ring in your laptop to Apple, or oe of its authorized service providers, to either have idividual keys or the whole keyoard replaced, for free:
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TrumpHotels.com greets you with a scenic vista -- sea, sky, palm trees and a beautiful pool.TrumpHotels.org, on the other hand, offers you pictures of immigrants in temporary detention centers, along with some out-of-context quotes from the president himself.Yep, it sure looks like someone bought the TrumpHotels.org domain name and decided to turn it into satire, lampooning the commander-in-chief over zero-tolerance policies which saw parents separated from their children at the US-Mexico border.Domain name records show that the TrumpHotels.org domain was registered on Wednesday, though it's not clear who purchased it -- the owner hid his or her identity by registering through a proxy service.Trump has since signed an executive order reversing the family separation policies and pledged to reunite families.Though President Trump pledged to divest himself of his businesses on the campaign trail -- meaning he might not be directly involved with Trump Hotels -- The Daily Beast reportedly obtained an email from Trump Hotels' then-director of revenue management that claimed he was still overseeing some business at the hotel, and that he asked whether his presidency hurt the business.
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Microsoft data center went sideways this week for five hours with cooling issueAmid forecasts of heat and fears of water shortage in Ireland on Monday, Microsoft was about to confront a drought of a different kind: an Azure service outage.The disruption, which lasted from 1744 UTC on Tuesday, 19 June 2018 to 0430 UTC on Wednesday, 20 June 2018, downed a slew of services, as we previously reported.Microsoft has now revealed that source of its troubles: Mildly warm weather.That day in Dublin, where Microsoft's North Europe data center resides, the high temperature reached a pleasant 18 C or about 64 F in Freedom Units.Not exactly a scorcher, but nonetheless too much for the company's kit.
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Alcatel has secretly expanded its portfolio of smartphones with the unleashing of the Alcatel 1, a low-end device, in Russia.The Alcatel 1 succeeds the Alcatel 1X Android Go device launched earlier at the MWC.Though it is still targeted at the first time smartphone users, the device packs even lesser internals relative to the Alcatel 1X.The Firm hasn’t revealed the release date of the low-cost smartphone, but it should be made available in the next few days, and it is still not known whether or not it will be released in other markets.The device will hit the market in gold, blue, and black, and as for pricing, the device should cost lesser than the Alcatel 1X.Measuring 137.6 x 65.7 x 9.8 mm and a weight of 134g, the device features a somewhat compact 5-inch 480×960 18:9 touchscreen with a 1.3 GHz MediaTek MT6739 SoC with quad-core Cortex-A53 CPU under its hood.
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In case you missed the initial announcement, Reddit introduced an alpha test for a News tab in its iOS app about a month ago.The feature provides a dedicated in-app area where news content on a variety of categories can be accessed directly.This week, the company revealed that it is bringing that new tab to all of its iOS users, but not everyone is happy about it.A few weeks ago, Reddit launched an alpha version of the News tab in its iOS app as an initial test with some users.That evidently went well and the company is back with a new announcement: the testing has moved into beta.Under this beta, Reddit is releasing the News tab to all of its iOS app users.
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In a rare but not unprecedented acknowledgement of fault in one of its products, Apple announced Friday that it would cover the cost of repair of recent MacBook and MacBook Pro keyboards, for free, for four years from the date you purchased it.It won’t keep your keys from succumbing to a speck of dust, but at least you won’t have to pay for the fix.Apple’s keyboard woes have been well-documented, if anecdotal; The Outline was a vocal critic as early as last October.Complaints have plagued the so-called butterfly style keyboard since its launch; recent models have suffered key failure with no apparent catalyst.Because the problem seems inherent to how the butterfly keyboard is constructed—once debris gets under the keyboard, it can’t get out again, neutering presses—there’s no simple solution, and certainly no at-home fix.So instead, Apple will let you bring your laptop in for repair, either at an Apple Store or an authorized service provider—or mail it to an Apple repair center—and the company will fix your faulty keyboard for free.
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Netflix original drama Ozark is finally back in the spotlight.The company has released a reveal trailer for the upcoming second season, which drops on August 31.We get around one minute of scenes from the upcoming season, each hinting at a return of the same dark storyline, but with a narrative that’s even more intense.Netflix launched the first (and currently only) season for Ozark last year, quickly earning itself a new hit.The show enjoys solid ratings and a strong fan base, many of whom compare it to Breaking Bad, hinting at a potential small-screen blockbuster for the company.The show’s return has, until now, been kept quiet.
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When I say "I work on the internet," I don't mean it in an "I have a lot of email" kind of way.I mean my beefy homebuilt computer is running out of memory -- because I might have 100 browser tabs open at any given time.But a month or two ago, Google Chrome gave me an unexpected gift that kinda sorta changed my life: Sawtooth browser tabs that let me keep track of the ridiculous stack of webpages I've opened.I hope I'll be able to keep them.Used to be, there was an annoying practical limit on how many browser tabs you could use at a time, because you wouldn't be able to tell them apart.It looked kinda like this:
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A team of researchers at the Systems and Network Security Group at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, in the Netherlands, say they were able to leverage the security weakness to extract crypto keys from another running program in 99.8 of tests on an Intel Skylake Core i7-6700K desktop CPU; 98.2 percent of tests on an Intel Broadwell Xeon E5-2620 v4 server CPU; and 99.8 per cent of tests on a Coffeelake part.Their code was able to lift a secret 256-bit key, used to cryptographically sign data, from another program while it performed a signing operation with libgcrypt’s Curve 25519 EdDSA implementation.The extraction technique is not reliant on speculative execution, and thus is unrelated to Spectre and Meltdown.There are easier ways for hackers to extract data from a computer or other device, via security bugs in browsers, PDF readers, email clients, and so on.A processor can have a number of cores, two, four, eight, and so on, each separately fetching and executing code from memory.If a core is told by an operating system to run a thread in one program and a thread in another program simultaneously, it is then possible for one of the threads to spy on the other thread by watching how it accesses that CPU's private resources.
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