The next version of the Nissan Leaf is going to come with quite a fancy innovation in the form of its e-Pedal option -- an all-in-one power and braking control that Nissan says should be good for 90 per cent of your driving day.In short, you press it down to go, like you do in all cars.The new bit is that lifting off this e-Pedal activates the standard EV regenerative braking system and slows you down, fairground dodgem style, so it should do away with the brake pedal altogether for the majority of tedious stop-start modern driving situations.It even holds the cars stationary on hills, which ought to make it a lovely easy drive.There's a video about it, as Nissan wants the world to stop talking about bloody Teslas you can't even buy all the time and start being excited about the new Leaf it'll be fully revealing this September:The only concern is that Nissan says drivers still have to occasionally use the proper brake pedal in emergency/panic situations, so there's going to be some training of the brain to be done in order to gauge just how much a car can be brought safely to a stop using the regen system alone.
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While speculation continues to swirl over the bidding for its fixed-line network business, Hutchison Telecommunications Hong Kong is looking to spark fresh growth at its mobile operation by offering international roaming for as low as HK$15 a day.Mobile arm Three Hong Kong will launch its so-called Roam-in-Command programme this Friday, providing discounted data roaming service in six countries in Europe and 10 countries across Asia-Pacific, as well as packages that combine the United States, Canada, mainland China, Taiwan and Macau.Hutchison Telecom’s aggressive strategy may help kick new life into the moribund roaming business of the city’s three incumbent mobile network operators, which include HKT and SmarTone Telecommunications.Kenny Koo, the director of roaming and service development at Three Hong Kong, said the operator is drawing on its close industry alliances “to tailor value-for-money roaming packages that offer extensive overseas coverage”.Those partnerships include those with Japan’s NTT Docomo, British multinational telecommunications giant Vodafone Group, Asia-based mobile alliance Conexus and the rest of the Three Group businesses under Hutchison Telecom parent CK Hutchison Holdings.Three has mobile network operations in Austria, Britain, Denmark, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Macau, Sri Lanka, Sweden and Vietnam.
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From the whiteboards and VHS players of 20 years ago, to the tablets and virtual learning of today, education is evolving in exciting new ways.New university concepts are challenging the status quo and preparing graduates for a 21st century working environment.This non-profit undergraduate programme received 16,000 applications for 300 places in 2016, making entry more competitive than any Ivy League University.Elsewhere, students often learn in spaces that mirror a world they might aspire to work in, from fieldwork or engineering labs to theatres and recording studios - a far cry from sitting in rows and transcribing from textbooks.They undertake more personalised learning and active peer collaboration, accessing in-depth research material and seeing how others consider similar issues, regardless of distance, age and culture.Feedback from a wide range of peers and participation in uniquely co-creative processes can be invaluable, provided students develop sufficient skills of discernment to filter out the ‘white noise’ and cope with the risk of information overload.
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I'm currently tackling a cold, an angsty and swollen wisdom tooth, an oncoming cough, and the fact I want to sleep almost all the time.But perseverance is a classic British trait, so I soldier on.So I managed to put this together for you all, as I am wont to do.Daydream now has a brand new homescreen design, letting you see all the best content and experiences Daydream has to offer - without having to go searching for it.Your fingerprint scanner is useful for far more than just security, and this app lets you use various gestures to perform a variety of different actions on your phone.For instance, hate the digital home button?
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Milan has had enough, and if we’re being honest, we can completely understand why.Starting this Summer, the city’s town hall has banned selfie sticks from Milan’s historic Darsena docklands area.According to news site The Local, the ban is part of a wider crackdown on tourists and younger locals exhibiting anti-social behaviour in the city centre.Selfie sticks aren’t the only objects to be given the shove.Glass bottles, containers, tins, firecrackers and fireworks have all been placed on the list.Selfie sticks essentially allow humans to take pictures which prove they were actually at a location, more often than not obscuring said location in the process and ruining what could have been a perfectly beautiful photograph.
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Taking the "I've spent £2.20 on an Americano so now I live here" attitude of some coffee house customers to the extreme, the police will use cafes to conduct meetings with the public.London Mayor Sadiq Khan plans to save as much as £15m by shutting official meeting places around the capital.For some time now police have met with the public in libraries and supermarkets because people simply don't use them.Instead, he suggests going to where the public go, to places like coffee shops to meet with concerned citizens.And it's not actually a bad idea, as so many of us just visit these places as part of our daily routine, but might not pop into a library or police station every day.Criticism of the plan seems mostly to revolve around getting the public onboard.
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Biometrics move as TSB readies iris recognition technology for its mobile banking appTSB claims it is the first European bank to commit to rolling out iris recognition technology in its banking apps.The thinking is that TSB customers will soon be able to use a smartphone to access their bank accounts, simply by looking at the device’s iris scanner.They can also access their account via the existing fingerprint feature.A study last month found that both banks and their customers overwhelmingly favour the use of biometrics, but adoption remains sluggish.Biometrics of course are popular asd they often remove the need for the customer to remember lengthy IDs or passwords.
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Criminals and terrorists are using the so-called dark net to buy weapons, a new study has suggested.Those selling the illicit weapons often disassembled and sent them in different packages or embedded them in old stereos or printers, the report found.Researchers found that firearms and related goods generated 136 sales per month and a monthly revenue of $80,000 (£62,000).The firearms trade has gained attention following recent terrorist attacks.The dark net is a part of the internet that requires specific software to access, in order for users to remain anonymous.While the trade was unlikely to fuel large-scale terrorist operations, it had the potential to become the platform of choice for "lone-wolf" terrorists to obtain weapons and ammunition, the report said.
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Committee will examine the possibilities of AI and how it could impact societyThe UK parliament has called on a Select Committee to carry out research into the future implications of artificial intelligence (AI).The study will look into the economic, ethical and social implications of advances in the technology, examining a range of topics including the current state of AI and how it might develop in the future given the pace of technological change.The committee is already calling for evidence and accepting submissions from any relevant parties, with the report scheduled for 31 March 2018.Given the potential of AI, there are of course plenty of areas to consider, such as the impact of AI on society, the public perceptions of the technology, the sectors most and least likely to benefit from it and the future ethical implications.The committee will also focus on the data-based monopolies of large corporations and the government’s role in fostering an environment for future development.
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Even so, there has been particular turbulence in recent days as fears of a "civil war" among its adherents first grew and then subsided, although they have not gone away altogether.On Sunday, the value of one bitcoin dropped to about $1,863 (£1,430) before bouncing back to $2,402 on Wednesday, according to data from the news site CoinDesk - still some way off a June high of $3,019.Bitcoin risks becoming a victim of its success.The popularity of the financial technology has caused a slowdown in the amount of time it takes for transactions to be processed, with some users complaining of having to wait three days or more for confirmation of trades when the backlog was at its worst, in May.The issue is that Bitcoin's underlying technology has an in-built constraint: the ledger of past transactions, known as the blockchain, can have only 1MB of data added to it every 10 minutes.As a reward, the successful miners are given newly generated bitcoins.
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Not every bit of the past should be dug up for the sake of nostalgia.Which is to say, not every game from your younger years should be remade, despite those rose-tinted memories.Crash Bandicoot was all but the PlayStation mascot when Sony first entered the console arena in the 1990s.He was the fast-paced, snarly marsupial who powered through levels in the vein of Mario and Sonic.Crash helped lead the way in 3D gaming – a revelation, at a time, that pretty much revitalised the platformer market.The original Crash trilogy (available for the PS4) has now been given a long-awaited remake.
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Borsa Italiana, the Italian subsidiary of the London Stock Exchange Group (LSEG), says it is using IBM Blockchain to help European SMEs access credit and link into digitising certificate data.Traditionally, smaller companies do not have access to public stock exchange networks or formalised credit structures, but the plan is for Borsa Italiana to help smaller companies trade and operate more easily in the exchanges.The IBM blockchain solution for unlisted SMEs in Europe is designed to replace the paper trading certificates that are usually issued to private companies."With a more digitized, streamlined and transparent process enabled by the blockchain solution, various parties - including issuers, regulators and investors - will have increased insight into company information," said IBM.Using the blockchain solution, Borsa Italiana is hoping to change how unlisted companies in Europe can exchange and bring greater transparency around shareholder data and, at the same time, expand their access to credit.Borsa Italiana is the latest in a series of stock exchanges that will be using IBM Blockchain.
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Meituan-Dianping’s CEO Wang Xing responded to negative comments on the recent controversy about food delivery app Meituan Waimai (美团外卖, Meituan Takeaway) using separate boxes for halal food, our sister site TechNode Chinese is reporting.This week, a picture of Meituan Waimai using a separate food box for halal food was widely circulated on the Chinese internet, stirring up controversy with many netizens claiming discrimination against non-Muslims.The Meituan Waimai app was flooded with one-star comments of angry Chinese netizens claiming that Meituan users should delete the app.Initially, Meituan did not respond to this.And then one user called “Meituan city manager Zhang Wei,” published the user’s comment on knowledge sharing platform Zhihu, which once again led to strong condemnation from the public.After a long silence, Meituan responded to the issue on its official Weibo account on the evening of July 19th:
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Almost every other movie these days has a virtual reality tie in.It’s almost unavoidable considering how popular VR is.That’s especially true if the film in question is fantasy or, better yet, sci-fi.With the San Diego Comic Con kicking into full gear this week, there is no better time to promote such virtual reality experiences.Blade Runner 2049, the sequel to a sci-fi cult classic, is no different, and Oculus is only too happy to bring Gear VR owners an appetizer of what’s to come later this year.The original Blade Runner was never really heavy on the visual effects.
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A German consumer protection agency is suing an electronics retailer for not warning its customers about the security holes in a cheap Android phone it was selling.A well-known weakness of the Android ecosystem is that some manufacturers sell phones running outdated versions of Google's operating system, and don't keep on updating them to close known security vulnerabilities.Google may give manufacturers the patches they need to do this, but this protection often doesn't reach the consumer.This issue is now at the centre of the case involving a Cologne branch of the German electronics giant Media Markt.The branch is being sued by the North Rhine-Westphalia consumer protection agency, the Verbraucherzentrale NRW.Media Markt no longer stocks the T6, but it did stock it back in early August last year, when the Verbraucherzentrale NRW sent someone to buy a unit.
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Doom developers id Software have made the 2016 game's paid-for multiplayer add-ons free for all players and introduced a new progression system ahead of a free trial of the game running this weekend and starting today (20 July) on PS4, Xbox One and PC.The new patch brings the exhilarating reinvention of the classic shooter to version 6.66, and means that all players will have their progress wiped due to the new system for progression.Old players will get a badge to indicate that they are veterans and can elect to keep some of their unlocked items if they wish.Under the new system, players will have to complete challenges and meet requirements to level up and unlock new weapons and gear.The old system relied on random number generation to generate gear players could then upgrade.Each of Doom's three downloadable content (DLC) packs has focused on expanding its multiplayer side.
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Apple gains support from Asia against Qualcomm.The ongoing stand-off between Apple and Qualcomm has got more heated with Apple's manufacturing partners joining the company against Qualcomm.Hon Hai/Foxconn, Compal, Wistron and Pegatron — all manufacturing partners of Apple in Asia —have filed a counter suit claiming that Qualcomm violated two sections of the Sherman Antitrust laws that exist to maintain fair competition within the US to benefit consumers."Qualcomm has confirmed publicly that this lawsuit against our clients is intended to make a point about Apple and punish our clients for working with Apple," Theodore J Boutrous, a lawyer representing the four companies, said in a statement.The counter suit is seen as a response to the suit that Qualcomm filed in May this year seeking licensing fees that these manufacturing partners had reportedly stopped paying at the Cupertino-based tech giant's instruction.Apple's manufacturing partners have called Qualcomm's lawsuit, "yet another chapter of Qualcomm's anticompetitive scheme to dominate modem chip markets, extract supracompetitive royalties, and break its commitments to license its cellular technology on fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory terms," a Bloomberg report noted.
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Microsoft is putting its money where its mouth is in its attempts to break into the embedded computing space, announcing a partnership with Johnson Controls to put the Windows 10 Internet of Things (IoT) Core platform into a smart thermostat dubbed Glas.Announced back in 2015, Windows 10 IoT Core is - as the name suggests - a cut-down version of Microsoft's flagship operating system designed for embedded devices in the Internet of Things spectrum.Although lacking a traditional graphical user interface or support for legacy applications, the platform is designed to be relatively lightweight and offer the comfortable familiarity of Windows application programming interfaces (APIs) along with tight integration into the company's Azure cloud computing platform.Despite numerous initiatives designed to boost adoption, including making the platform available free of charge for single-board computers like the Raspberry Pi, commercial adoption of Windows 10 IoT Core has been slow-to-nonexistent.To address that, Microsoft has announced that has partnered with Cork-based Johnson Controls - best known for its founder, Warren S. Johnson, having patented the world's first electric room thermostat in 1883 - into a smart thermostat driven by its Azure-based Cortana voice-activated assistant platform.Dubbed Glas, the thermostat is designed to compete with devices like the Google-owned Nest.
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Yesterday (19 July) Nintendo released the companion app for its Nintendo Switch online service on iOS and Android devices.The app allows players to sample the private lobby and voice chat features that the company will start to charge players to use from 2018.The app has been released to coincide with the release of Nintendo's multiplayer-focused Switch exclusive Splatoon 2 tomorrow (21 July), and this is when most players will be able to try out the online features.They'll find however, that there is a sizeable and frustrating drawback to voice chat.One that further confuses Nintendo's already confusing online strategy.If they want to have a quick look at Twitter, or another app, any voice chat channels will be closed.
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South Korea’s Eyedentity Entertainment launched an integrated e-sports business brand “World eSports Games & Leagues” (WEGL), Wednesday, seeking to combine gaming contests and entertainment.The company said it plans to extend the range of its esports business from just hosting contests to fostering talented professional gamers and building new stadiums for competitive events.“We will strengthen investments in e-sports and pour about 50 billion won (US$44.59 million) into this business,” Eyedentity Entertainment CEO Guo Haibin said at a press conference in Seoul.“We plan to spend the money in building new e-sports arenas and fostering new professional gamers and teams.”According to Eyedentity Entertainment, the global esports market grows by 40 per cent every year.In particular, Korea and China together hold a 23 per cent stake of the global esports market.
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