Andy Haas

Andy Haas

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Nvidia's GeForce Now (GFN), which has been in beta on the PC and Mac, is one of the most eagerly awaited of the cloud-gaming services; moreso than even Google's Project Stream, because we've experienced it firsthand for over a year.Today, the CEO delivered some interesting updates about the status at his keynote for the company's Graphics Technology Conference, notably that it currently has 300,000 users and that there are a million more waiting to be accepted into the beta program.If you're already in the program, take heart: the company also announced its data center strategy, which includes RTX servers.Those are destined to replace the Tesla P40-based systems currently powering GeForce Now, which should deliver better performance -- higher frame rates!-- as well as better scalability.It also announced a software developer's kit for GFN which will enable single sign-on, as well as provide developers with the ability to streamline launchers and installs on the platform.
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Microsoft today announced that as part of its newly released Halo Insider Program, PC players can sign up to test the upcoming Halo: The Master Chief Collection version coming to Windows some time later this year.Announced last week, the PC port of developer Bungie’s Halo trilogy, in addition to Halo: Reach and the single-player campaign of Halo 3: ODST, is coming both to the Microsoft Store and Valve’s Steam marketplace.The collection was originally released on Xbox One back in 2014.“As a Halo Insider, you’ll have the opportunity to regularly provide feedback and insights that help shape and inform current franchise initiatives and the future of Halo,” the company says on its dedicated Halo Insider page.“You will also be given exclusive opportunities to participate in public flights of in-progress Halo game releases and provide feedback to the development teams.”According to Microsoft, the collection will be released in stages, starting with Halo: Reach, which was not included in the original Xbox version.
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At Nvidia’s annual graphics technology conference, CEO Jensen Huang took to the stage to unveil the new Jetson Nano.computer,” the Nano joins Nvidia’s family of other Jetson computers such as the AGX Xavier or Jetson TX2.The Jetson Nano can supposedly deliver 472 gigaflops of computing performance all while drawing as little as 5 watts of power.It’s powered by a powerful 128-core GPU and a quad-core A57 CPU from Arm.The GPU is based on the older Maxwell architecture, which was the predecessor to the more current Pascal and Turing.The minicomputer can also support high-resolution sensors and, according to Nvidia, can “process many sensors in parallel” and run “multiple modern neural networks on each sensor stream.” Because it supports a lot of the most popular A.I.
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For four years now Apple has been charging $400 for the iPad Mini 4.But if you wanted a compact Apple tablet it was your only choice.At first glance, the new iPad Mini looks identical to the old one.At second glance, it still looks identical.It has the same big bezels above and below the 7.9-inch screen; the same Touch ID home button; the same aluminum back in the same space gray, silver, or gold colors.Apple has put a new processor inside, upgrading from the A8 to the A12 Bionic, which is the new chip powering the iPhone XS, XS Max, and iPhone XR.
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At SXSW in 2018, all of the buzz fell on HBO for its Westworld activation.This year, the agency behind it all, Giant Spoon, went big again with a Game of Thrones stunt that had people talking (and lining up to donate blood).On this week’s episode of the Adweek podcast—Yeah, That’s Probably an Ad—Brand Marketing Editor Kristina Monllos joins Senior Editor Doug Zanger to discuss her experience at this year’s SXSW and listen in on the panel she moderated there with Trevor Guthrie and Marc Simons, co-founders of Giant Spoon (Adweek’s 2018 Breakthrough Agency of the Year).You can stream the episode below, subscribe via Apple Podcasts or look for us on Spotify.
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Bright days are ahead for wearables.The worldwide wearables market will grow 15.3 percent by the end of this year, according to a Monday forecast from market researcher IDC.Shipments of wearables will reach 198.5 million units by the end of 2019, and 279 million units by the end of 2023, the firm predicts.Much of that growth will be driven by the rapid increase of watches, ear-worn devices and wrist bands, IDC says.Greater adoption in health care will also contribute to growth."Wearables stand to play an important role in digital health, constantly collecting important patient data while also giving patients the ability to self-monitor," IDC research director Ramon Llamas said in a press release.
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Anthem, BioWare's cooperative, team-based shooter is a change of pace for the makers of Dragon Age and Mass Effect.With a focus on cooperative PvE combat popularised by the likes of Destiny, it landed amid a swirl of hype and expectation, which it has so far failed to meet.Anthem has a big challenge in front of it then – with arguments that its endgame content is weak, its loot system broken and its story not up to scratch when compared with previous narrative-driven BioWare RPGs, it's fighting to win back the hearts of those who were initially in awe of its promise.Read on for everything you need to know about the Iron Man simulator.It will improve with patches, updates, and a strong community, but it isn’t a particularly strong foundation.This is less an anthem, and more an annoying earworm..."
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Unlike conventional robot arms with their hinged and swivel joints, the flexible arms being developed by Professor Stefan Seelecke and his research group at Saarland University are constructed using 'muscles' made from shape-memory wires that have the ability to bend in almost any direction and to wind themselves around corners.The new technology can be used to build large robotic arms with the flexibility of an elephant's trunk or ultrafine tentacles for use in endoscopic operations.From the 1st to the 5th of April, the research team will be at Hannover Messe, where they will be using prototypes to demonstrate the capabilities of the shape memory arms at the Saarland Research and Innovation Stand (Hall 2, Stand B46).In contrast, an elephant's trunk or an octopus's tentacle offer far greater agility.The engineers at Saarland University have drawn inspiration from these natural models.If the current is switched off, the wire cools down and lengthens again,' explains Professor Seelecke.
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Occasionally, an automaker initiates a recall because it discovered a problem during routine inspections.Other times, a recall can come about because of reports from vehicles already in the field.Chrysler's latest recall stems from the latter.Chrysler has issued a recall for approximately 48,000 examples of the 2018 Chrysler Pacifica minivan.The vehicles in question were all built at the Windsor Assembly Plant in Canada between Nov. 1, 2017 and Feb. 28, 2018, and that build range coincides with an increase in warranty claims for "buzz, squeak and rattle" related to the defect that spurred the recall.The problem stems from the suspension system.
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Microsoft has launched its Windows Defender extensions for Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome.The company said its goal was to extend its container technology to other browsers and give customers a way to protect themselves against browser-based attacks.The extensions automatically redirect untrusted navigations to Windows Defender Application Guard for Microsoft Edge, Windows Insider program head Dona Sokar and senior program manager Brandon LeBlanc said in a blog post on Friday.When you visit a site, Windows Defender checks the URL against a list of trusted sites.If the site is deemed malicious, you'll be redirected to an isolated Microsoft Edge session.From there, you can travel to any site that hasn't been defined as trusted by your organization without any risk to the rest of your system.
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GM idled the plant because it was producing a slow-selling car and running well below capacity.Rather, it's democratic socialism, and for the most part, it has involved a long expansion of the welfare state.FDR's New Deal of the 1930s is the best example, but we also have Lyndon Johnson's Great Society in the 1960s and, more recently, Obamacare.The point is that the growth of this "socialist" side of the American experience hasn't really touched on more ideologically controversial aspects of proper economic socialism — you know, the awkward Marxist approaches that in the hands of various freedom-hating dictators over the past century have turned the means of industrial production into instruments of the state.That was until Trump became President and starting tweeting at the people who run major US companies to do what he says — or else.The business logic of GM's decision
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Promising to balance affordability and specifications, the new tablets slot right into the midrange, offering not one but two options for those turned off or priced out of Apple’s existing iPads.The new iPad Air fills a big hole in Apple’s iPad rangeHad you looked at Apple’s iPad line-up yesterday, you’d have been forgiven for assuming that the Cupertino firm had decided there was no market for mid-range tablets.Priced from $499 for the iPad Air WiFi, and from $629 for the iPad Air WiFi + Cellular, it’s right in the sweet spot for those looking for more power than an entry-level iPad, but who don’t quite need (or can’t quite afford) the laptop-replacing iPad Pro at the other end of the scale.And of course, the support for a Smart Keyboard – unlike the iPad’s Bluetooth keyboard support alone – gives those wanting to ditch their Windows or macOS laptop another option versus a Chromebook.Selling a greater number of iPhone XS Max smartphones than iPad mini tablets contributes a lot more to Apple’s bottom line.
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Last month Lego announced two new sets that spawned from Lego Ideas, the user-created range of sets that's brought classics like the Yellow Submarine, TARDIS, DeLorean, and more.One of the announcements was a Lego rendition of classic-Disney short Steamboat Willie, and the company has just announced it'll go on sale on 1st April.Disney’s Mickey Mouse and Minnie Mouse made their first appearance in “Steamboat Willie” on November 18, 1928 and have been winning our hearts ever since!Recreate this iconic animation with this new LEGO Ideas set, launching April 1.It's going to cost £80, and comes packing 751 pieces.So it's not going to be the most taxing build, but it still looks quite nice.
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The study also found that every time a cleantech startup licensed a technology developed by a government agency, the company secured - on average - more than double the amount of financing deals when compared to similar startups: a 155% increase one year after taking out a licence.Collaboration with universities and private firms are a familiar path for many startups, yet government partnerships are significantly undervalued when it comes to green technologies, say researchers.While the role of public-private partnerships in sectors such as biotech and IT is well known, they say that - until now - there has been a lack of data on the effectiveness of these alliances in cleantech."Our findings suggest that some of the signs commonly used to track innovation and business success, such as patents and financing, increase when new cleantech companies partner with US government departments or labs," said study co-author Laura Diaz Anadon, Professor of Climate Change Policy at the University of Cambridge.Prof Claudia Doblinger, study first author from the Technical University of Munich, said: "Government research laboratories have a major role to play in the climate challenge but also the growth of small businesses - twin objectives at the heart of many policy discussions, such as the Green New Deal in the United States."The researchers built a new dataset of 657 US cleantech startups and the more than 2,000 partnerships those companies established between 2008 and 2012, to gauge the different outcomes for private and public alliances.
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The answer is that all three have suffered significant data breaches in recent days owing to misconfigured and insecure servers.California-based Meditlab Software Inc, which provides software to general practice offices, pharmacies and hospitals, was exposed after Dubai-based cyber security company SpiderSilk spotted a server with over six million records on it running on a password-free Elasticsearch database.Exposed: a host of sensitive data such as blood test results, personally identifiable information and patient medical records.The data was contained within a sub-domain of a Puerto Rico-based server platform MedPharm Services.Meditlab said it is in the processes of reviewing its records and logs to understand “potential exposure.”Next Up: Gearbest Shoppers and Singaporean Blood Donors…
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In the latest chapter of ongoing issues between Apple and Qualcomm, the latter has won a patent infringement case against Apple in San Diego.A jury there found that the iPhone 7, iPhone 7 Plus, iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus and iPhone X infringed two patents, one of which is for “flashless booting” – a technology which allows a smartphone to speedily connect to the internet after being switched on, and which removes the cost and footprint of requiring separate flash memory.The other patent allows apps to transfer data to and from the internet quickly and efficiently by acting as a smart “traffic cop” between the processor and the modem.Additionally, the iPhone 8, 8 Plus and X were also found to infringe a Qualcomm patent that helps improve game performance and graphics while simultaneously improving a phone’s battery life.The ruling is a big win for Qualcomm, which was awarded $1.41 (around £1.05 / AU$2) per device for the three patent infringements, amounting to a total of $31 million (roughly £23,368,000 / AU$43,606,000).The win – which follows similar rulings in China and Germany – is unlikely to mean much for consumers.
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Actor John Challis, who is forever known as Boycie from Only Fools and Horses and is still very happy to slip into the character for regional Christmas light activations, birthday parties, public appearances and pantomimes, has revealed he tried to convince BBC bosses to let him switch programmes and install him as the big man in sci-fi property Doctor Who.He did this by sending the Who producers letters, as it was the 1980s and that's how people did things.Challis explained that he thought it looked like a laugh being able to play such a bonkers character, so he must've imagined himself being a bit of a Tom Baker-style madcap Doctor in his spare time.Challis said: "I have always fancied playing the Doctor because I have always wanted to play larger than life characters.And I have always seen the Doctor as an older person.I have written two or three letters over the years when I've known that they are going to change the Doctor, saying: 'What about this old face?
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In a moment of distress, a person making a 911 call can’t always communicate clearly, if at all, making it all the more difficult for first responders to get to the scene quickly.While wireless carriers can at the current time provide an approximate ground location regarding the whereabouts of a 911 caller — vital if the caller is unable to provide it themselves — a new proposal announced by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) requests that carriers provide an accurate vertical location so a caller can be quickly located inside a multi-story building.The location data should be accurate to within just three meters of the of the handset used to make the emergency call, the FCC said.The proposal is part of the FCC’s ongoing effort to improve its Enhanced 911 location accuracy rules, which require carriers to automatically transmit information on the location of an emergency caller to 911 call centers.According to a news release, the rules require carriers to meet “an increasingly stringent series of location accuracy benchmarks in accordance with a timetable, including provision of the caller’s ‘dispatchable location’ (such as the street address and apartment number) or vertical location.” With the cooperation of carriers, the system could launch on a phased-in basis starting in April 2021.The FCC said the plan had been in the pipeline for a while, but it’d decided to hold off on a decision until it had received additional testing data, which has now occurred.
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Steve Hardigree hadn't even gotten to the office yet, and his day was already a waking nightmare.As Googled his company's name that morning last June, Hardigree found a growing list of headlines naming the 10-person marketing firm he'd founded three years earlier, Exactis, as the source of a leak of the personal records of nearly everyone in the United States.A friend in an office adjacent to the one he rented as the company's headquarters in Palm Coast, Florida had warned him that TV news reporters were already camped outside the building with cameras.But each one enumerated hundreds of details on individuals, ranging from the value of people's mortgages to the age of their children, as well as other personal information like email addresses, home addresses, and phone numbers.Exactis licensed that information to marketing and sales customers, so that they could integrate it with their existing databases to build more comprehensive profiles.Much rarer, however, is Exactis founder Steve Hardigree's willingness to talk to WIRED about that experience: Being the company at the center of a nationwide data privacy fracas, as well dealing with the legal, bureaucratic, and reputational fallout.
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If you’re starting a new machine learning or deep learning project, you may be confused about which framework to choose.As we’ll discuss, there are several good options for both kinds of projects.There is a difference between a machine learning framework and a deep learning framework.Essentially, a machine learning framework covers a variety of learning methods for classification, regression, clustering, anomaly detection, and data preparation, and may or may not include neural network methods.• Machine learning lessons: 5 companies share their mistakes. ]A deep learning or deep neural network framework covers a variety of neural network topologies with many hidden layers.
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