Qi Cao

Qi Cao

I am always curious about this unknown world.

Followers 23
Following 41
Sweden
A huge variety of animals seem capable of reading Earth’s geomagnetic field. Every three years, the Royal Institute of Navigation organizes a conference focussed solely on animals. This April, the event was held southwest of London, at Royal Holloway College, whose ornate Victorian-era campus has appeared in “Downton Abbey.” For several days, the world’s foremost animal-navigation researchers presented their data and findings in a small amphitheatre. And odysseys of this sort are not limited to the feathered tribes. Instead, Wiltschko discovered that if he put the robins in cages equipped with a Helmholtz coil—a device for creating a uniform magnetic field—the birds would change their orientation when he switched the direction of north. So do dogs when they crouch to relieve themselves, and horses, cattle, and deer when they graze—except if they are under high-voltage power lines, which have a disruptive influence.
Sweden
Ashley Madison is a perfect example of that and many people were shocked at just how many real identities were contained in the data, identities that then caused a great deal of grief for their owners.I'm going to focus on what's readily accessible to the bulk of the population.Also consider how you fill out the following form when you create the account:These attributes won't show up on other sites where the address is used, but they can start to surface in other places.Thing is though, as much as I love Bitcoin (try using it for perfectly legitimate, above board purposes one day just to experience it), the mainstream, above board places you can use it are pretty limited.Not always, mind you; whilst many people have "static" IP addresses (the one IP sticks with them for the life of their time with the ISP), many others are dynamic (the ISP rotates the addresses over time).Here's what I'm seeing as I write this:The primary value proposition of a VPN for me is that it means I can use public wifi while travelling and not worry about my traffic being intercepted by an airport or the hotel.
Sweden
Facebook might be hosting upwards of 8 billion views per day on its platform, but a wide majority of that viewership is happening in silence. As much as 85 percent of video views happen with the sound off, according to multiple publishers. Take, for instance, feel-good site LittleThings, which is averaging 150 million monthly views on Facebook so far this year. Eighty-five percent of its viewership is occurring without users turning the sound on. Similarly, millennial news site Mic, which is also averaging 150 million monthly Facebook views, said 85 percent of its 30-second views are without sound. PopSugar said its silent video views range between 50 and 80 percent. The news shouldn’t come as much of a surprise, as Facebook has built a video ecosystem that does not require users to turn the volume up — and publishers have been more than happy to play ball. Most users’ news feeds are now inundated with short videos that feature text or captions narrating what’s being shown on screen. While most of these videos feature narration or some form of background music, the intent is to make it easy for people to consume the information presented in the videos without needing to turn the sound on. “From day one, there pretty much has been the psychology that you have to catch their attention immediately,” said Gretchen Tibbits, chief operating officer for LittleThings. Facebook counts a view at three seconds, which means publishers have to find ways to convince users to stick around in order to capture that view. “But while the first three seconds are critical, the video also has to be designed to capture attention without needing sound,” said Tibbits. Tailoring content to the whims of the Facebook news feed has helped publishers scale on the platform. It’s also turned news feeds stale as publishers put up countless videos that have the same look and feel. Take, for instance, this NowThis video about a Tylenol ingredient that makes people less empathetic and this Tech Insider video about a futuristic bike. While they focus on completely different topics, the key ingredients are the same: a striking visual or message up front followed by a text-heavy explanation of the content. But it works, which means publishers will continue to do this type of content. When it comes to distributing branded content, advertisers for the most part have also come to terms with these quasi-silent videos as the de facto standard — non-live edition — for Facebook. And in these instances, the format works. According to MEC North America, branded videos from its clients average 85-90 percent silent video views. But that doesn’t mean consumers are less engaged. Internal studies conducted by the agency showed that KPIs like brand lift and intent to purchase were not affected by whether the viewer watched the video with the sound on or off, said Noah Mallin, head of social for the agency. “Sound is still an option [on Facebook], but it’s not required,” said Rye Clifton, director of experience at GSD&M. “If you can make something compelling without needing people to turn the audio on, you’re ahead of people who are not thinking that way.” But that’s only if the content is completely made for Facebook. It’s different when it’s a paid media buy for a video ad that wasn’t intended solely for Facebook. When measuring the performance of campaigns on a cost-per-view basis, nine times out of 10, YouTube will come in at a lower price than Facebook, according to Nick Pappas, CEO of SwellShark. (A hurdle here is that Facebook only charges advertisers for three-second or 10-second views, whereas on YouTube, advertisers can pay based on completed views.) “As a paid advertising channel, [Facebook] works sometimes, but it’s so important to have creative that meets the criteria of the platform — otherwise it can be a waste of money,” he said.
Sweden
Chinese telecom giant Huawei Technologies Co Ltd [HWT.UL] became the world's No. 1 applicant for international patents in 2014, a United Nations agency said Thursday, underscoring the innovative strides made by Chinese technology companies. Huawei was followed by San Diego-based chipmaker Qualcomm Inc while Huawei's crosstown rival ZTE Corp, which was the world's leading applicant in 2012, took third place in its number of filings, according to the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO). WIPO's report, which is sometimes viewed as a rough barometer of a country's technological progress, noted that China was the only country to see double-digit growth in its filings, although U.S. companies led by far. High-tech and automotive powerhouse Japan, home to last year's leading applicant Panasonic Corp, saw its total filings slide. In recent years China's top policymakers have offered incentives to nudge Chinese companies to shift from low-value, low-cost manufacturing to fostering innovation. The country has also made a series of reforms to improve IP enforcement within its legal system, long considered dubious by foreign and Chinese firms alike. The emphasis on innovation was reiterated this month at China's annual parliamentary session by Premier Li Keqiang, who made a high-profile visit to Huawei's research and development center in January. Huawei has touted its yearly research and development budget - equal to 10 percent of its revenue - as proportionally higher than many of its peers in industry. Chief Executive Ken Hu told reporters in Barcelona this month Huawei will spend $600 million on 5G wireless research and development from 2013 to 2018. Chinese technology industry observers say Qualcomm's antimonopoly settlement reached this year with Chinese regulators could spark a patent war as Chinese firms such as ZTE use their IP portfolios - and a stronger legal regime - to extract royalties from smartphone makers. (Reporting by Gerry Shih; Editing by Vincent Baby)
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