Charles Michels

Charles Michels

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Following 16
US
Front cofounders Mathilde Collin and Laurent PerrinCourtesy of FrontTech investors are throwing money at Front, a five-year-old startup that aims to change the way teams get work done.The startup makes a shared inbox app that lets teams handle messages from email, texts, Slack, and social media, all in one place.This year, the 28-year-old cofounder and CEO of Front, Mathilde Collin, went on a five-day fundraising sprint to raise a Series B round.She pitched 11 investors, received 10 term sheets, or investment offers, and walked away with $66 million from Sequoia Capital and several others.Collin later wrote a blog post to share the pitch deck she used to raise venture (and it's not the first time she's opened up Front's books a little bit to help other entrepreneurs).
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UK
Humans have long sought answers to the fundamental questions of our existence.How did we get here?For some, the answers lie in churches full of sacred texts.Matt Liston, former CEO of cryptocurrency company Augur, recently collaborated with artist Avery Singer to found a blockchain-based religion called 0xΩ, pronounced “Zero Ex Omega”.A consensus network based structure for religious belief and ritualA synergistic belief set using consensus processes to form a collective consciousness and accelerate toward the Omega-point
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UK
Earlier this week rumours spread that Netflix and YouTube would be coming to Nintendo Switch, after Best Buy accidentally posted that information on its website.The retailer recanted, but the damage was done and many expected Nintendo to announce the news during its E3 showcase later that day.That didn't happen, but now Nintendo of America president Reggie Fils-Aimé has said some words.Speaking to Bloomberg Television, Fils-Aimé confirmed that conversations about bringing the two streaming platforms to Switch are "ongoing":“When we launched the Switch, we were very clear we wanted to position the device as a game-playing device.We’ve done that, and so you’ve seen Hulu for example come on to the platform.
US
When working with or mentoring other developers, one problem I’ve noticed is that many developers can’t write to save their life.This goes beyond “poorly documented” or whether grammar they get wrong (such as when writing in a second language).The main problem is one of organizing thoughts for a purpose and communicating them to an audience.This is something that everyone struggles with sometimes.Most organizations, readers, and even managers don’t expect perfect grammar or prose from technical people.What they, or any reader, expect is that you get your point across clearly and in a manner they can understand.
UK
Top judges say ISPs – but not webhosts or caches – can pass the buckBT has won a UK Supreme Court battle over who should pay the costs of trademark infringement blocking orders – and it won't be internet service providers."There is no legal basis for requiring a party to shoulder the burden of remedying an injustice if he has no legal responsibility for the infringement and is not a volunteer but is acting under the compulsion of an order of the court," ruled the judge, who sat as part of a five-strong panel at the highest court in the land.Section 97A of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 allows rights-holders to go to court and get a blocking order – the question in the current case is who stumps up for the costs of complying with that order?BT and co-appellant EE were arguing against an earlier finding by the Court of Appeal, which held in 2016 that ISPs should pick up the costs – in this case, to block sites peddling knock-off luxury Cartier watches and Montblanc jewellery.Sweeping aside various legal precedents founded on EU law, Lord Sumption ruled: "In English law, the starting point is the intermediary's legal innocence.
UK
Stockholm City Council has enacted tough new laws against the public display of sexist adverts, enabling it to forcibly remove offending material within 24 hours of it appearing on out of home sites in the city.The vote to ban any imagery which depicts men or women as "sex objects" or a "stereotypical image of gender roles" comes as part of a broad crackdown on "demeaning" displays that are judged to be "sexually discriminatory".The Swedish capital is currently marketing itself as a 'city open for all'Explaining the rationale behind the decision, Green Party deputy mayor Daniel Hellden said: “It affects a lot of people, especially younger women.It makes them think about their own bodies and how they look and feel in a negative way.“Maybe the companies won’t put up ads which are sexist or objectifying if they know we’re going to remove them after 24 hours.
US
Think of molecules as having little hands.But when you get to some functions, such as writing, it matters if you are right-handed or left-handed.Scientists have struggled to determine if molecules have unique left- or right-hand functions because their physical attributes such as length, weight, density, elasticity, etc.UCF's NanoScience Technology Center Associate Professor Debashis Chanda and Ph.D. student Abraham Vazquez-Guardado have figured out a unique way to do it.Such a nanostructure does not have geometrical chirality yet it creates two opposite light chirality (left or right) on demand.Therefore, this rotating light field has the ability to probe and identify any chiral molecule like drugs, proteins or DNAs.
UK
You’ve heard it before: VR is almost certainly the future of gaming, but the technology just isn’t there yet for mass appeal.That’s neat enough on its own, but Sandbox takes immersion a step further by incorporating motion capture technology for more realistic movements and in-game actions.Then you strap on your headset – a modified Oculus Rift in my case, but the company use the superior Vive Pro in other locations – and a VR backpack PC that’s lighter than you probably think.Lastly, you attach this doodad onto each of your limbs.The power of shiny balls allows the motion capture cameras to accurately track individual arms and legs as you move around the room.The game we played was called Deadwood Mansion.
US
For the first time in its 330 year history, insurance behemoth Lloyd's of London is launching a global innovation sandbox to find tech talent that can develop new solutions as it attempts to digitise.Nicknamed Lloyd's Lab, the new initiative will see corporate innovation specialist L Marks go on the hunt for entrepreneurs, early and growth stage insurtech startups to partner with the Lloyd's market.Over ten weeks, selected startups will work alongside Lloyd's to deliver answers to some of its key challenges, based in a co-working space inside the Lloyd's building in Leadenhall.They will also get the chance to grab some potential funding for their ideas, as they develop products, platforms and processes to bring Lloyd's into the tech-driven insurance world.The sandbox will focus on four key themes, which range from the customer experience, building a "relationship-driven culture" and creating smarter insurance products.Read more: The UK has been crowned the tech unicorn capital of Europe
US
With all the stereotypes surrounding millennials, marketers may find it tempting to fall into easy traps.But millennials will not be put into a box, and pandering to them will hurt your brand’s image, according to new research from Fuse Media, whose audience is comprised of multicultural millennials.The majority of millennials (77 percent) are turned off by advertising that portrays their generation using clichés, while 78 percent don’t like it when ads try too hard to speak to people their age.Rather, millennials value authenticity: 89 percent prefer ads that are simple and straightforward, while 90 percent like it when a brand’s messages match its actions.“These findings reinforce that this audience appreciates thoughtful brand communications that tell a compelling story, take a stand or provide a thought-provoking perspective,” said Fuse Media’s Jason Miller, evp, ad sales and integrated marketing.“So, despite the myth that multicultural millennials are ad-averse, the fact is that they relate to brands and ads that are authentic, useful and entertaining.”
US
There’s really no nice way to put this: In his new film, Zone Out, Silicon Valley star Thomas Middleditch makes you want to do just that.It’s not simply that he talks about having sex with a jar of salsa, it’s also that he looks absolutely ghastly.His co-star, Elisabeth Gray, doesn’t fare much better: a mustache—someone else’s—finds a home above her lips.Sharp and Ross Goodwin, a creative technologist at Google, entered the 48-hour challenge as part of the Sci-Fi London film festival, and fed a bunch of sci-fi movie scripts to a neural network to see what it would spit out.The children reach into the furnace, but the light is still slipping to the floor.It was this sort of poetic gibberish that encouraged Sharp and Goodwin to enter the contest again the following year, this time with a new set of actors (including David Hasselhoff) and with the intent to actually collaborate with the AI.
US
Amazon and its grocery store chain Whole Foods announced this morning that savings for Prime members will make their way to ten more stores across the U.S. this week, including Arizona, Georgia, Oregon, North Carolina and Washington, among others.The tie-up gives Amazon shoppers another reason to join the Prime membership program – 10 percent off on-sale grocery items at Whole Foods, and other deeper discounts on a weekly basis.The discount program was first announced in mid-May, starting in Florida, with promises to soon expand across all U.S.Whole Foods Market and Whole Foods Market 365 stores throughout the summer.Amazon has been making good on that goal, with a rollout to 12 more states, including California, Texas and Colorado later that same month.The company today says the Whole Foods discounts have reached the following markets: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri (Kansas City only), Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Washington.
US
Jack Daniel's Country Cocktails is set to unveil its mobile interactive art project, titled " flavorsofpride" at the LA Pride Festival in West Hollywood today and tomorrow (June 10).The campaign features a three minute video show that celebrates the LGBTQ community's increasing diversity across genders, ethnicities, sexualities, religions and generations.It also features a soundtrack by LGBTQ singer/actress Mikalah Gordon (American Idol).Through projection mapping technology, festival guests will be invited to be part of the show by having their faces captured and integrated into the visual content.The flavorsofpride projection mapping show will further utilize two 3D-printed polygonal mannequins and three of Jack Daniel's wooden barrels as its primary canvases.Fabricia da Silva, multicultural field marketing manager, Brown-Forman Corp said: "Celebrating individualism and living life on your own terms are hallmarks of the Jack Daniel's legacy, which are also embodied by the mission of LA Pride.
US
Anthony Bourdain didn’t think much of Instagram.To his own 2.3 million followers, Bourdain was more likely to post images of art, or classic-rock icons, or his girlfriend than meals.When he did turn to food, the images seemed like a targeted dig; he displayed mounds of caviar on a yacht, glistening golden egg yolks, and in his final post, a unreasonably large steak lunch.But if Bourdain never loved Instagram, he certainly understood it more than most—after all, he’d built an entire career by evoking a primitive pre-social-media kind of FOMO in his readers and watchers.Bourdain motto was vague, if relatively consistent: "move."Bourdain’s axiom was a rallying cry to run towards the things and experiences that no one else was having—the kind of things that, at the time he launched his show No Reservations in 2005, few Americans thought were worth having.
US
Andy Warhol's painting '14 Small Electric Chairs' is to be sold in a partial exchange for cryptocurrencies on June 20.London-based art gallery Dadiani Fine Art, which has dealt in cryptocurrencies in the past, will oversee the deal.A piece of Andy Warhol's artwork is among the latest items to be sold for cryptocurrencies.The painting is Warhol's 1980 piece "14 Small Electric Chairs," and it's reportedly valued at around $5.6 million.Dadiani Fine Art, a London-based gallery headed up by art dealer and "crypto-economist" Eleesa Dadiani, plans to accept 49% of the painting's cost in exchange for bitcoin and ethereum.Dadiani, who is known by her nickname "the Queen of Crypto," has previously overseen deals for luxury items like rare cars and fine art in exchange for cryptocurrencies.
UK
Microsoft has announced that certain Xbox Insiders will soon be able to test out even earlier builds than they can now.The company has announced a new “Alpha – Skip Ahead” ring for Xbox Insiders, which essentially splits its current alpha testing ring into two.Those who are invited into this new ring of testers will get to check out the newest work-in-progress Xbox One features, sometimes even months before they’re announced or launched.As explained over on Xbox Wire, launching the Alpha – Skip Ahead ring will allow Microsoft to test its RS4 and RS5 builds simultaneously.Alpha – Skip Ahead Insiders will primarily be testing advanced builds within RS5.If you want to play a bigger role in the development of Xbox One software, then, it sounds like this is the ring for you.
US
Discovery Inc., owner of channels like Food Network and HGTV, has acquired the TV and streaming rights to more than 140 golf tournament events, including the PGA Tour.The 12-year deal will cost Discovery $2 billion, and goes into effect in 2019.It's part of Discovery's effort to get into the sports broadcast market with a new Netflix-style streaming service.Starting next year, golf fans looking to binge-watch the sport will want to tune in to Discovery, and they might even have a Netflix-style streaming app to try out too.Discovery Inc. has agreed to a $2 billion, 12-year deal that includes the TV and streaming rights to the PGA Tour, as the company begins to expand into sports coverage.The deal begins in 2019, and will include more than 140 golf tournaments per year, as well as the PGA Tour, on Discovery channels and an upcoming Netflix-like streaming service.
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With automakers duking it out for electric vehicle supremacy, EV's are becoming a fairly common sight on the streets of America, and in New York, New Jersey and California they are about to get more common still.California has long been a bastion of electrification and already features a number of buying incentives as well as a relatively robust charging network.But as of today, it is effectively doubling down on an electric future with a $738 million allocation for projects that promote EVs.New York and New Jersey are riding the EV wave, too (presumably in response to criticism by The Pixies, re: sludge), with a combined $550 million investment in electric vehicle charging stations, including locations at airports, which is cool.What's interesting is that these significant investments come in the wake of the EPA's most unrighteous attempts to dismantle federal fuel economy standards.In fact, Bloomberg estimates that the US will have over 1 million electric vehicles on its roads by the end of 2018 and that we'll see 16 million EV's hit the streets by 2028.
UK
Visa debit cards are not working across the UK and most of Europe after the company suffered a major network fault.Shoppers have found themselves unable to pay for goods using their cards, both by contactless or chip and PIN machines.The outage has even affected customers trying to pay with other card companies, as Visa provides the payment infrastructure for many popular shops.The issue appears to be due to this latter system, with Visa's network also forming the backbone for many financial institutions.Users of many UK banks have received alerts or messages informing them of a "disruption of service" which means they cannot spend or receive money.The outage seems to be widespread across the UK, however a small number of payments do appear to be going through - so stay on your toes if you need to use your Visa card today.
Sweden
Seeing a tremendous opportunity to leverage machine learning technologies in the healthcare industry, Bessemer Venture Partners is launching a $10 million early-stage seed program to back new startups.Led by the firm's swiss healthcare investor, Steve Kraus (seriously: the guy has his own podcast), and its head of investments in Israel, to Adam Fisher, the Deep Health Seed Program will place bets of anywhere between $100,000 and $2 million into early stage companies using machine learning to solve problems in healthcare.It's no exaggeration to say that machine learning can transform the healthcare industry entirely.The proliferation of data brought on by the increasing digitization of workflows in hospitals, the patient information, the popularization of wearables, and mapping of the human genome means that everything from the health of populations to the genetic composition of our cells can be monitored and potentially managed through the application of the data.Bessemer has already placed several bets on this hypothesis, including its investment in Qventus (a hospital management service that we’d covered earlier this month).And the firm has a long history of investing in healthcare including early best on companies like Allena Pharmaceuticals, associate Professor Health and publicly traded companies including OvaScience, Verastem, and Flex Pharma.
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