Daniel Yale

Daniel Yale

Followers 128
Following 23
US
Signs of neurodegenerative diseases, visible years before the emergence of clinical manifestations, can be detected during the examination of medical samples by means of fluorescence microscopy.The new dye, proposed by the Polish-American group of scientists, is a step towards the personalized neuromedical prophylaxis of the future.They are deposited as a result of proteins misfolding, to structures mainly known as amyloid beta.There are grounds to believe that soon the first signs of neurodegeneration will be identifiable in medical laboratories at an earlier stage of development of brain disease, and in a much more precise way than ever before.The new avenues of detection are being opened thanks to the achievements of a Polish-American team, which includes scientists from the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences (IPC PAS) in Warsaw, Wroclaw University of Technology, the University of Michigan and the University of California, Santa Barbara.Usually, small molecules are used for this purpose, selected so that they only bind with the molecules that are to be detected.
3
US
The SHOT (Supporting Hyperplane Optimization Toolkit) software recently won the annual prize of the Computational Infrastructure for Operations Research (COIN-OR) Foundation.The software is developed by Docent Andreas Lundell, University Teacher Jan Kronqvist and Professor Emeritus Tapio Westerlund at Åbo Akademi University, Finland, and can be used for optimizing real-life problems, for instance within industry or artificial intelligence.Officially released in June 2018, the SHOT solver will find the guaranteed optimal solution for a particular type of nonlinear integer problems known as convex MINLP (Mixed-Integer NonLinear Programming) problems.The source code is open and the application is based on the ESH (Extended Supporting Hyperplane) algorithm, developed by the same team.'With the methods we've developed, the solution can be captured between an upper and a lower limit.Nearly all real-life problems, for instance, in industry, are nonlinear.
2
UK
Clock's ticking on Ellison's smack talkre:Invent AWS boss Andy Jassy has doubled down on claims Amazon will "be done" with Oracle databases by 2019, and used his Re:Invent keynote to throw shade at Big Red.Speaking at Amazon's main tech conference in Las Vegas this week, Jassy said that the world of "old guard commercial-grade databases" has been "miserable" for enterprises for the past 20 years.Targeting cloud rival Oracle, Jassy said these legacy database vendors are too expensive and don't serve customers well, pointing to aggressive audits and proprietary systems that lock in customers.He also rubbished Big Red's market share, showing a slide that was mostly AWS orange, followed by Microsoft at 13.3 per cent, Alibaba at 4.6 per cent and Google at 3.3 per cent.Oracle was identified by a pop-up Larry Ellison, appearing like a small cartoon villain, in a segment of "other vendors".
3
UK
The other day we heard news that Huawei was planning on launching a phone that swaps the notch for a hole in the screen, in what is supposed to be an attempt to beat Samsung to market.Now a leaked image has popped up online claiming to show off said phone, and a very obvious hole where the camera lives.The image comes from TrendingLeaks, which also claims the phone is to be called the Huawei Nova 4.As you can see, the camera now lives in the top left corner of the phone with absolutely no notch in sight.Not that it makes much difference compared to today's miniature drop-like notches.It's also one of those full-screen phones that benefits from these new camera-hiding gimmicks, and you can just about see what appears to be a cutout for the speaker grill at the very top of the phone's case.
5
US
Brand-influencer relationships used to be as simple as a YouTuber standing next to a man dressed as a giant tongue.At the very first Vidcon, in 2010, the tongue-scraper company Orabrush sent a bumpy pink mascot to the convention center to strike up quasi-impromptu interactions with early influencers like iJustine.When you fast-forward to the megawatt influencers of today, who regularly ink six-figure deals with giant global brands to promote products to their millions of followers on Instagram and YouTube, a stuffed tongue seems quaint.For both brands and influencers, the stakes and risks of partnering are now incredibly high.These relationships often sour, and when brands yank that firehose of cash away it’s web-wide news: YouTube controversies like Pewdiepie’s Hitler cosplay, Logan Paul’s suicide forest misadventure, and beauty guru Laura Lee’s racist comments (and meme-worthy botched apology) reflect badly on the brands that used to line these creators pockets.These scandalous fallouts have sped up a pivot that was already underway.
7
UK
Malware will become far more sophisticated in 2019, with cybercriminals using AI to drive attacks, according to McAfee’s latest threat predictions for the coming year, which also underline the dangers likely to be posed to the smart home.McAfee believes that new strains of malware will be equipped with increasingly sophisticated evasion techniques.The security firm notes that the WaterMiner malware is capable of stopping its mining process whenever the victim runs an antivirus scan, or indeed opens up the Task Manager to try and see if any running processes are consuming a lot of CPU usage – effectively hiding itself.And not only will cybercriminals be better able to deal with AI-powered anti-malware measures, but they will begin to employ AI themselves.McAfee notes: “We expect evasion techniques to begin leveraging artificial intelligence to automate target selection, or to check infected environments before deploying later stages and avoiding detection.”Malware using AI to such ends will soon be found in the wild, according to the security company.
6
UK
Asus has announced it is teaming up with Quantumcloud to allow owners of its graphics card to mine cryptocurrencies and get digital payouts via PayPal or WeChat.The partnership means that Asus graphics card owners can use the Quantumcloud software to manage their digital wallet, set up cryptocurrency mining and perform conversions and transfers automatically, taking a lot of the complexity out of cryptocurrency mining.It also means that while your graphics card is idle – basically when it’s not being used by games or graphic-intensive tasks – it can be used to mine cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin, so you can earn money while your PC is on.Cryptocurrency mining, where people use their graphics cards to ‘mine’ digital currencies, can seem too good to be true, and many people have been put off mining due to its complexity.Asus’s partnership with Quantumcloud could change that.It’s also more secure, as according to Asus, the customer data is protected under GDPR regulations to keep your personal and financial information private and secure, something that some other mining apps do not offer.
6
UK
It can be a bit of a nightmare chasing Nintendo Switch deals around Black Friday, as the deals come in thick and fast while the best ones selling out early on.But there's no need to worry if you didn't find one over the weekend or on Cyber Monday, as we've found some super cheap deals on brand new consoles from reputable stores on eBay.Actually, the prices are even better than we saw at the weekend, but you'll have to be quick as the coupon code that produces the magic prices expires at 23:59 tonight.The promotional eBay voucher code knocks 15% off a huge range of items, with a minimum spend of £20 and a maximum discount of £50.We've found some cracking discounts on PS4 prices and Xbox One bundles too.Nintendo Switch | £279.99 £237 at Argos' ebay / Curry's eBay
4
UK
He enlisted the help of his six-year-old son James to try out Google's Family Link app with Nokia smartphones.I was an adult when I got my first phone, my daughter was around 10 when she got hers – and my son has been using one of his mum’s old phones since he was five.It’s not something he takes to school or leaves the house with – it’s merely a device on which he can play games, watch YouTube Kids, and send me and the rest of his family messages, endless emojis and GIFs on WhatsApp.Manufacturers have created handsets specifically designed for kids, but they often come with their own ecosystems of apps, and fairly limited functionality and parental controls.Nokia asked me to take a look at Google’s ‘Family Link’ app, which enables parents to manage the apps on their children’s device.The parent installs the app on their phone and becomes the ‘Family Manager’.
3
UK
Doubt cast on Spark's 5G build, despite minister saying ban isn't really a banReports emerging from New Zealand suggest local carrier Spark has been blocked from buying Huawei kit for its 5G rollout.The New Zealand Herald reported that Spark had been informed of the ban by Andrew Hampton, director general of the Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB).Such a ban would reflect the attitude in Five Eyes partners Australia and the USA, both of which have blocked the Chinese vendor from taking part in telco infrastructure projects.It was, at first, apparently backed up by its minister, Andrew Little, who said a Huawei implementation would have exposed Spark's network to the risk of "intervention in an unauthorised way".Like that of Australia, the government of New Zealand has legislated to give its spooks the power to block "risky" vendors from important networks, as well as a veto over network architectures they don't like, in the "The Telecommunications Interception Capability & Security Act" (Australia's parallel is the "The Telecommunications and Other Legislation Amendment Bill").
3
China
What happened: US Senators Marco Rubio and Chris Van Hollen have told key members of the White House that ZTE may have violated the terms of a settlement agreement signed with the US government.The senators said ZTE set up a population database for the Venuealean government using components that were allegedly supplied by US-based Dell Technologies.ZTE reportedly embedded some of its employees within Venezuela’s state telecommunications firm, CANTV, the president of which is subject to US sanctions.Why it’s important: Earlier this year, ZTE paid $1.4 billion in fines as well as escrow funds, appointed a new board of directors, and vowed to uphold US sanctions after it was found to have violated sanctions on Iran and North Korea and later lied about its dealings.Before making the payment, the company was prohibited from sourcing US-made components, crippling the telecommunications giant.Senators Rubio and Van Holen have been at the forefront of efforts aimed at reimposing punishments on ZTE should they violate the agreement.
8
UK
MP Damian Collins said the internal documents are to be released once they have been stripped of personal information, amidst an ongoing row between Facebook and ParliamentDamian Collins, the MP who is chair of Parliament’s Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee, has said he could release internal Facebook emails next week, amidst an ongoing row between Parliament and the social media firm.The disclosure follows Facebook’s decision not to send chief executive Mark Zuckerberg to attend a multinational inquiry into disinformation earlier this week, a choice greeted with derision by the nine countries who had sent envoys to the event.Facebook has endured a year of negative headlines focusing on the platform’s use by foreign powers to spread propaganda and influence US elections, as well as Cambridge Analytica’s use of personal Facebook data for political campaign purposes.Ahead of this week’s “International Grand Committee on Disinformation”, Parliament used rarely employed powers to seize internal Facebook documents from the chief executive of a small app developer who had travelled to a business meeting in London.The documents purportedly disclose information about loopholes in Facebook’s privacy policies that allowed Cambridge Analytica to obtain data that it later allegedly used in a 2016 US presidential election campaign, according to the Observer, which first reported the seizure.
7
China
Alibaba’s ‘Double 12’ e-commerce event may seem like less of a deal compared to the massive shopping and specials spree that is Singles Day (November 11) in China.But Taobao is upping the ante for its December event with delivery times as low as two hours in select cities, as well as sizable discounts, Tencent reports.This year’s event kicks off on December 1 and lasts through December 12.The high-speed delivery service will be available in eight cities: Shanghai, Chengdu, Wuhan, Guangzhou, Xi’an, Fuzhou, Xiamen, and Shenzhen.From 12am-1am on December 12, shoppers can snag limited-time discounts of as high as 70% on certain goods.In addition, Taobao will hold its first Double 12-themed variety show to spice things up this year.
9
US
There has been much talk about machines taking jobs, yet research shows that most employers expect overall headcount to increase as a result of automation.Across multiple sectors, Artificial Intelligence (AI) is helping organisations to eliminate low-level, repetitive tasks, freeing up humans’ time to focus on delivering more strategic, premium services.Recruiters have been using Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) to streamline their processes for years, but algorithms have the potential to revolutionise the talent pipeline further.Could we soon be walking into jobs without any human interaction with our new employer?Powered by Natural Language Processing (NLP), AI can be used to automate tasks such as screening CVs and scanning databases for candidates.This arms recruiters with in-depth insights on potential targets, giving them more time to build relationships with candidates and clients.
9
US
The empty frames hanging inside the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum serve as a concrete reminder of the world's biggest unsolved art heist.While we may never uncover those original masterpieces, a team from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) might be able to help, with a new system aimed at designing reproductions of paintings."If you just reproduce the color of a painting as it looks in the gallery, it might look different in your home," says Changil Kim, one of the authors on a new paper about the system, which will be presented at ACM SIGGRAPH Asia in December."Our system works under any lighting condition, which shows a far greater color reproduction capability than almost any other previous work."The team found that RePaint was more than four times more accurate than state-of-the-art physical models at creating the exact color shades for different artworks.In the future the team expects that more advanced, commercial 3-D printers could help with making larger paintings more efficiently.
10
US
You might not be able to fit it on your wrist, but physicists have created two clocks that are so accurate they won't lose time in the next 15 billion years.The research, published Wednesday in Nature, describes an atomic clock that uses an optical lattice composed of laser beams trapping ytterbium atoms.Notably, the physicists based at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Maryland compared two independent atomic clocks to record historical new performance benchmarks across three key measures: systematic uncertainty, stability and reproducibility.Andrew Ludlow, project leader, explained to NIST that these three measures can be considered the "royal flush of performance" for atomic clocks.The ability to reproduce the accuracy of the ytterbium lattice clock in two independent experiments is of particular importance because it shows for the first time, according to Ludlow, that the performance of the clock is "limited by Earth's gravitational effects."Think of Interstellar's water world where each hour that passes on the planet is equivalent to seven Earth years because of its high gravity.
3
China
Cheetah Mobile’s CM browser, CooTek’s TouchPal keyboard, and Mango TV were all singled out for weak protection of user privacy in recently released survey results by Shanghai’s Consumer Council.On Wednesday afternoon, the council pointed out that all three phone apps require text-related permissions that are apparently unrelated to their functions.The CM browser also requests call-related permission and suffers from a low-level Android application program interface (API), which could compromise data privacy.The TouchPal keyboard additionally requests information related to user location.The deputy-secretary general of the council told The Paper that with text-related permissions, an app might be able to send messages from users’ phones without their knowledge.The report also states that the CM Browser was able to listen in on outgoing calls.
7
UK
Research led by two top universities has shed doubt on whether biometric security systems, on their own, can protect our most sensitive data.But that’s okay; we’ve fixed the problem, at least somewhat, by introducing a slew of new devices that rely on biometric authentication, whether in the form of fingerprints, voice recognition, or facial scanning.Researchers at New York University and Michigan State University, however, have their doubts about whether biometrics alone are enough.“Fingerprint-based authentication is still a strong way to protect a device or system, but at this point, most systems don’t verify whether a fingerprint or other biometric is coming from a real person or replica,” said Phillip Bontrager, lead author of the paper and doctoral student at NYU.At issue is the way in which most fingerprint sensors work.Previous research by NYU professor Nasir Memon detailed a fatal flaw in some system.
4
China
New Zealand Blocks Huawei, in Blow to Chinese Telecom Giant – The New York TimesWhat happened: New Zealand has blocked the world’s largest telecom equipment maker Huawei Technologies from supplying technology for 5G network in the country, joining the ranks of the US, Australia and other developed countries who regard the Chinese tech giant as a threat to security.Spark, a major telecom carrier in New Zealand, said in a statement on Wednesday that it was not able to use Huawei’s 5G equipment after the country’s intelligence agency rejected its proposal on national security grounds.Why it’s important: Over the past year, the US rallied against Chinese telecom equipment manufacturers including Huawei and ZTE, fearing these companies’ close ties with the Chinese government would make their network equipment vulnerable to surveillance and interference.Earlier this week, however, Papua New Guinea decided that it would uphold a deal with Huawei to lay domestic internet cables, turning down a joint counteroffer from Australia, the US, and Japan.A recent report from the Wall Street Journal suggests US officials have been trying to persuade its foreign allies to avoid using Huawei 5G equipment.
10
US
Here comes the Spider-Man, as the old TV theme used to go.Yes, the superpowered webslingers of Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse aren't your daddy's Spider-Man.This new animated movie features an assortment of different versions of the much-loved Marvel character -- and still finds room for bags of character, heart and joy that burst from every gorgeous pop art frame.There's something about the cartoon form that allows the creators to be a little looser, and so Spider-Verse is free to dive headfirst into the tangled web of Marvel comic book continuity in a way that just wouldn't be plausible in a live action movie.So Marvel's many different takes on Spider-Man become the different strands of a multiverse -- or Spider-Verse.In another, anime-inspired Peni Parker pilots a spider-themed mech suit.
3
More

Top