Daniel Yale

Daniel Yale

Followers 109
Following 22
China
A report on state broadcaster China Central Television (CCTV) on Sunday highlighted the costs of acquiring and maintaining vehicles in the car rental economy, and said that industry’s high entry barriers mean startups are struggling to make good on their investments.While car sharing companies face the danger of cash crunches, they also fill a certain niche in the transportation market.For distances between 10 to 50 kilometers, they can be more cost-efficient than ride-hailing services.In addition, despite the growing adoption of personal cars in China in recent years, buying and maintaining a vehicle remains, as one CCTV interviewee in Sunday’s report put it, an “unrealistic” goal for students and others under a certain income threshold.In the same program, Tan Yi, CEO of car startup Gofun, told CCTV that the average daily uses for their electric cars was under three in 2017.He added that the company has sought to upgrade their fleet to “high-endurance” type vehicles, and has “passed the profit-loss balance line.”
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The iPhone time machine takes us back 36 years... to the Apple LisaFeature Dearly beloved, please join us in taking a moment to remember the Apple Lisa, a 36-year-old experiment in seeing just how much Apple could charge for hardware.Named for Saint Steve’s daughter, the Lisa project kicked off in 1978, finally making an appearance on 19 January 1983.It was pitched as a graphical competitor to the tiresome text-based computers dominating the marketplace.Featuring exotic hardware (including a mighty megabyte of RAM, considerably more than the 128 kilobytes of the IBM XT which would put in an appearance less than two months later) the Lisa was an exercise in seeing how much money Apple could squeeze out of the faithful.Even fully loading one of today’s Apple outdated dustbins (aka the Mac Pro) can’t get close, but the fruit-based firm had no such qualms back in the day.
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China
What happened: Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei plans to drive a new round of personnel reductions as it faces challenges amid China’s struggling economy.The solution is to “cut a portion of jobs with less value and simplify the organization to ensure those who work hard can gain more benefits from their jobs,” Ren Zhengfei, founder and chief executive said in an internal memo on Friday.He also mentioned the company will avoid overly laying off staff, while warning employees to prepare for “times of hardship” as the overall situation might be not as good as imagined.Why it’s important: A slew of China’s big technology companies has reportedly laid off employees over the past months, namely, Baidu-backed iQiyi, lifestyle service Meituan Dianping, and knowledge sharing platform Zhihu.Earlier this month, Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba was rumored to cut travel spending and postpone hiring.US tech giant Apple cut its revenue forecast for the first time in nearly two decades due to the weaker demand in China at the beginning of 2019.
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If you didn’t notice, today is Monday, January 21, which means two things.According to local news, Linus Dunkers traded over $2.5 million since 2014, and claims the tax man is demanding over three times what he made in profit.It seems that there is a lot of ambiguity over the classification of Dunkers’ activity.Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates have joined forces to develop a new cryptocurrency, Arabian Business reports.The new digital currency will initially be tested by banks with a focus on understanding how a blockchain-based cross-border payments system could actually work.The pilot also aims to help the two nations understand the regulatory implications of creating a “central currency.” Let this be a reminder that just because the blockchain was created for decentralized digital currencies, doesn’t mean they always will be.
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The tables turned big time on a supposed software developer posting under the identity “Tee Medlin” earlier this month after he sent an Instagram post accusing Microsoft senior cloud developer advocate Chloe Condon of stalking him at a conference—something that never occurred—and other social media users quickly discovered that much of Medlin’s online persona reeks of plagiarism and fakery.As Mashable reported, in the now-deleted Instagram post, Medlin claimed to be attending some sort of unspecified tech conference and uploaded a photo of Condon with a caption suggesting police should be notified if he goes missing.He further alleged that Condon “Has not stopped following me around, asking me questions, and telling me about her life since I got off stage this evening.Medlin’s photo was in fact ripped from a years-old article Condon had published on NewCo (astonishingly, about what it is like to be a woman attending predominantly male tech conferences).I’ve been harassed online before, but @teemedlin- I have no idea who you are, nor was I at a conference/meet-up/event w/ you 4 days ago,” she tweeted alongside a screenshot of the Instagram post.As Mashable wrote, Medlin initially stuck to his side of the story in comments on Instagram—but other Twitter users understandably perturbed by the situation eventually began to unravel other very suspicious swathes of his online very-important-tech-guy persona in the thread below Condon’s tweet.
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UK
Uber has had its fair share of troubles in its efforts to put self-driving cabs on the road, but before it tackles them all, it’s moving into new territory: building autonomous electric scooters and bicycles for its fleet of on-demand vehicles.TechCrunch noted that California-based 3D Robotics’ CEO Chris Anderson revealed Uber‘s plans to add self-driving capabilities to two-wheelers over the weekend.The Telegraph reported that the ride-hailing company is hiring engineers for this new department.Exciting announcement from @UberATG at today's @DIYRobocars event."Micromobility" = autononomous scooters & bikes that can drive themselves to charging or better locations.— Chris Anderson (@chr1sa) January 20, 2019
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UK
Some dreams live, some dreams die.And some dreams get killed off when supposed investors and supporter pull the rug from under them.That’s how many third-party Moto Mods died even before they could see the light of day.So what’s a small startup like Livermorium to do after being unable to deliver the much-awaited QWERTY slider Moto Mod?Why, make their own slider phone, of course!Good thing, then, that sliders are making a comeback.
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Mad as Hell about something?Not going to take it anymore?Well, you're in luck, because Facebook is currently rolling out a new tool in the US that will let users create and support online petitions, as reported by TechCrunch.Dubbed 'Community Actions', the petitions will appear directly on the site's News Feed, both publicly and for friends, allowing users to tag organizations or elected officials in order to bring more attention to the chosen cause.Along with following and clicking 'Support' on a Community Action, users will be able to share their own testimonials or media in the petition's comments section.The idea is that the cause will eventually go viral and reach as many people as possible.
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US
London-based venture capital firm Beringea has led a £6.5m funding round into UK data privacy and cybersecurity startup Exonar.The round was completed by Beringea alongside existing investors Downing Ventures, Amadeus Capital Partners and Winton Ventures.Exonar aims to help firms comply with the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation and other legislation by creating an overview of all of their sensitive data, enabling businesses to create inventories and tackle compliance issues more readily and securely.Beringea, which has $715m (£554.9m) under management across its UK and US offices, has previously backed companies such as luxury jewellery retailer Monica Vinader, and men’s fashion tech startup Thread.Managing partner Stuart Veale said he had chosen to invest in the startup because of its leadership team, which claims years of experience from working at firms such as BT, Fujitsu and Symantec."These are exciting times for Exonar," said its chief executive Adrian Barrett.
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UK
Theresa May is wasting £171,000-an-hour on “dangerous and unnecessary no-deal brinkmanship”, Jeremy Corbyn has claimed.The Labour leader said he would not engage in cross-party Brexit talks with the prime minister – triggered after May’s deal suffered a historic blow in the Commons on Tuesday – until she agreed to scrap the prospect of no-deal.“May’s ‘no deal’ threat is empty and hugely expensive, wasting billions of pounds we should be spending on vital public services,” Corbyn said.“It’s a pointless and damaging attempt to appease a faction in her own party when she now needs to reach out to overcome this crisis.”According to calculations by Labour, the government has already spent £1.9 billion preparing in case the UK crashes out of the EU without a deal – the equivalent of £171,000-an-hour in tax-payers money.The investment could have been used to pay the yearly salaries of 86,000 newly-qualified nurses, 50,000 secondary school teachers or 49,000 police constables, the party said.
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US
US government employees and their supporters have been setting up GoFundMe campaigns to get help with expenses amid the partial government shutdown.But now the popular crowdfunding site has launched its own campaign to assist federal workers.GoFundMe on Saturday launched the Government Shutdown Direct Relief Fund to help employees affected by the shutdown, now in its 30th day at time of writing.The site partnered on the campaign with author and speaker Deepak Chopra.As of Sunday afternoon, the campaign had raised $50,956 of its $75,000 goal.That was 469 individual donations.
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If you were saddened by Apple quietly killing off the iPhone SE last September, we've got some good news for you: the smallest, cheapest iPhone is back on sale in the clearance section of Apple's website, though for now this seems to be a US-only offer.MacRumors spotted the deal, giving you the chance to bag a brand new, unlocked iPhone SE for $249 (with 32GB of storage) or $299 (with 128GB of storage) – that's $100-$150 off the original pricing.As before, your choice of colors are silver, space gray, gold and rose gold.If you're tempted, head in the direction of the Apple website.We wouldn't expect stock to last for long, as this seems to be nothing more than Apple getting rid of some spare units.If you miss out and still want to get your hands on one of these phones, you'll have to explore other options (such as eBay).
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US
NEW YORK CITY—The band brings to the stage: two grids of foot-triggered effects pedals and switches; two music stands, covered with a smattering of synthesizers, touchscreens, and touch-sensitive pads; two laptops, connected to this variety of inputs in a center console; two stringed instruments, neither of which look exactly like a bass or a guitar; and two foot-triggered pieces of percussion.They've just put the final touches on their new album, titled Scholars, set to launch two months later (as in, January 18).The album's new songs deliver on a heady-yet-accessible fusion of genres like post-punk, dub, and (heavily amplified) folk, capped off by the inimitable sheen of Davis' singing.As for the gear—it kind of melts away."He got into making a marimba at one point."As he got older, Sanchez's musical interests shifted—in part because he'd visit a grandparent a few times a year in New York City.
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Afraid of missing out on the latest photo industry news while you’re out, well, actually taking pictures?Photography News of the Week is all the news you might have missed this week, published on the weekends.Alongside the biggest stories of the week, like Nikon’s new budget zooms, the new Fujifilm 100-200mm lens, GoPro Fusion’s firmware update, and the new Sony A6400, find briefs on the latest in accessories and photography news from this week.Photographers, beware: Self-driving car lasers can wreak havoc on your cameraSome types of direct light — such as a solar eclipse or laser shows — can permanently damage a camera’s digital sensor.But there’s another more “hidden” light source that can ruin a good camera: Self-driving cars.
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On the 50th episode of Digital Trends Live, DT’s daily morning show, host Greg Nibler and special guest Nicole Raney (managing editor of The Manual) celebrated by diving headlong into the hottest news stories of the day.First up: Netflix, having just dropped a bunch of money on the streaming rights to Friends and raised its prices, doesn’t seem too worried about other streaming services eating into its market share.That’s what DT’s Ryan Waniata argues in a recent op-ed, delving into how the increasing fragmentation in streaming, with every company hoarding their own IPs, will make streaming TV an annoying minefield for consumers to navigate.Change your passwords and check your credit rating, because there has been another massive data breach.Lots of email addresses and passwords were uploaded to a cloud service site called Mega, and while Mega has since taken the files down, that information may be floating out there.CEO Cory Rellas explains Drizly, the startup helping shop for alcohol online
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UK
As countries in the Middle East, Africa, and elsewhere struggle to find enough freshwater to meet demand, they’re increasingly turned to the ocean.Desalination plants, located in 177 countries, can help turn seawater into freshwater.A paper published Monday by United Nations University’s Institute for Water, Environment, and Health in the journal Science of the Total Environment found that desalination plants globally produce enough brine—a salty, chemical-laden byproduct—in a year to cover all of Florida in nearly a foot of it.“High salinity and reduced dissolved oxygen levels can have profound impacts on benthic organisms.”In fact, the study concluded that for every litre of freshwater a plant produces, 0.4 gallons (1.5 litres) of brine are produced on average.For all the 15,906 plants around the world, that means 37.5 billion gallons (142 billion litres) of this salty junk every day.
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News of this week’s so-called “mega breach” might deeply trouble you.Yes, every company should be held responsible for practising sloppy security, allowing your sensitive data to get into the wrong hands.Sorry, but that’s the way it is.The users who have little to worry about are the ones who, at the very least, have enabled some type of multi-factor authentication, the simplest being two-factor authentication or “2FA.” Even better off are those who’ve also adopted a reliable password manager, which allows them to create very long, complex, and unique passwords for each site they log into.Add in a physical security key, and you can sleep easy tonight.2FA works like this: You go to login to, say, your email account, and after entering your password, it prompts you to enter a code that’s been sent to your phone by text.
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Last week a thin, dazed and dishevelled teenager who had been missing for almost three months was found alive, wandering in a remote wooded area of Wisconsin.The front door had been blown off its hinges and both adults had suffered fatal gunshot wounds.Police issued an amber alert for the teenager immediately, dispatching some 200 officers to help search for her.Investigators said they did not consider Jayme a suspect, and warned they believed the teenager was in danger.The FBI offered a $25,000 reward for information leading to Jayme’s location, an amount later doubled to $50,000 by the Jennie-O Turkey Store, where the Closs couple work.Little is known about what Patterson did for money, though it has since emerged that he applied for a job on the very day he was arrested.
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Self-lacing sneakers have been the dream since Marty McFly first rocked Nike MAGs in 1989, but most attempts at turning shoe leather into smart sneakers have been expensive, produced in small batches, and frankly, a little gimmicky.Until now: Earlier this week, Nike revealed Adapt BB, the company’s latest self-lacing basketball shoe.And these actually seem … smart.At $350, the Adapt BB’s are a little more accessible than previous iterations, though as Peter points out, they’re likely to be worn by professional athletes and Nike-backed college teams to start.Also on this week’s podcast: WIRED’s Nitasha Tiku talks about a group of Googlers who have launched a public awareness campaign about mandatory arbitration agreements, arguing that employers use them to suppress workers facing harassment and discrimination.Show notes: Peter’s story on Nike’s Adapt BB is here.
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Travel app TRVL is offering Trump-shaped stress balls to travelers heading to Mexico, as a reward for those visiting in spite of damaging rhetoric from the US president.The item looks about how you’d expect: a recreation of the President’s head in squishy foam form.The company has 1,000 balls to give away, and they’re available to any traveler who books a trip to Mexico via TRVL’s site or app.For those who don’t know, TRVL is (as the name implies) a booking and travel app that allows anyone to act as a travel agent.Locals and experienced travelers can leave recommendations for other travelers, for which they can earn a commission.We at TNW found the platform quite promising when it took off in 2017.
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