Daniel Yale

Daniel Yale

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Following 22
US
The prizes, announced Thursday by AAAS and Subaru of America Inc., celebrate outstanding science writing and illustration for children and young adults.The award program, now in its 14th year, aims to spur the creation of new, high-quality books about science for children of all ages.The prize was launched in 2005, when AAAS and Subaru partnered to honor five authors and one illustrator for their contributions to the ever-growing genre of science books for children.Awards are given in four categories: children's science picture book, middle grades science book, young adult science book and hands-on science book.The criteria also require that each book be age-appropriate: For the youngest readers, a winning picture book should pique their curiosity about the natural world around them; for older readers, books should encourage the discussion and understanding of scientific ideas.Hands-on science books for any age must include inquiry-based activities that encourage problem-solving skills.
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Engineers in Switzerland say they’ve found a way to make a four-legged robot even harder to fight off during the eventual robopocalypse.In a new paper, published Wednesday in Science Robotics, they describe a system that trains the bot to move faster than ever, while still being able to resist attempts to knock it down.It could even get back up through its own power if it did fall.The ANYmal was originally developed by researchers at the Robotic Systems Lab, out of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETH Zurich).Unlike many four-legged robots in existence today, the waterproof ANYmal was specifically designed to traverse less-than-ideal conditions, like the woods, industrial sites, and snowy landscapes.According to ANYbotics, the bot can already be used in the real world to reach dangerous places humans can’t go, including for search-and-rescue missions.
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Amazon has rolled out its own backup service for AWS apps and data, a move that will inevitably hit independent suppliers of backup for the cloud computing service right in the wallet.AWS Backup protects storage volumes, databases, and file systems across Amazon's DynamoDB, Elastic Block Store (EBS), Elastic File System (Amazon EFS), Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS), and AWS Storage Gateway, with support for additional services planned for the future.Customers will also be able to back up on-premises application data through the AWS Backup integration with the firm's own Storage Gateway.Bill Vass, AWS VP for Storage, Automation, and Management Service spoke of the type of customers the firm plans to poach from backup businesses:Some are tinkerers who want to tweak and fine tune the full range of AWS services into a desired architecture, and other builders are drawn to the same breadth and depth of functionality in AWS, but are willing to trade some of the service granularity to start at a higher abstraction layer, so they can build even faster.We designed AWS Backup for this second type of builder who has told us that they want one place to go for backups versus having to do it across multiple, individual services.
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Shape-shifting accounting software biz Sage issued a trading update this morning and the good news - for investors at least - is that it didn't contain any nasty surprises, but did highlight a bounce in cloud sales.After a less than vintage year for the company that saw it part with CEO Stephen Kelly following operational missteps that dragged down sales, and led to missed forecasts, things appear to be more stable.For Q1 of fiscal '19 ended 31 December 2018, organic revenue jumped 7.6 per cent to £465m, which Sage said "reflects growth in products within, or to be migrated too, Sage Business Cloud of 9.3 per cent to £380m and a slight increase of 0.6 per cent to £85m in products with no current path to the Sage Business Cloud".Sage is battling cloud native upstarts and so converting as many of its number crunching customers to the services model has been imperative - getting there is easier said than done.Within the group sales, recurring revenue was up 10.5 per cent to £387m, "underpinned" by software subscription growth of 27.7 per cent to £237m, continuing the uplift seen at the close of the previous financial year.Classic on-premise software and service related sales declined 5.8 per cent to £65m, "reflecting the managed decline in licenses as the business transitions to subscription".
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Ahead of the official launch of its new flagship Micro Four Thirds camera on January 24, Olympus has released a third teaser video.The first two videos focused on the camera's potential action photography credentials, showing it being used to shoot a range of sport including football, waterpolo volleyball and motorsport.Both videos have given us brief glances at the camera, though these have often been tightly cropped shots or defocused.The third video though changes tack, focusing on the new camera's build quality and durability.It sees the camera (which we understand will be known as OM-D E-M1X) being used in a rugged-looking outdoor environment, in some pretty wet and humid conditions.We also get to see the OM-D E-M1X a little more clearly, though we still haven't seen a full reveal of the camera.
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UK
“It’s coming home, data’s coming home…”Call it a data Dunkirk: with politicians bumbling incoherently and currently deal-less towards Friday March 29, the date on which – without an Article 50 extension – the UK leaves Europe, a growing number of companies are ramping up their ability to offer customers enhanced UK data centre capacity.California-based cloud content and file sharing specialist Box is the latest to join the uneasy parade, today announcing the launch of a new zone to help customers keep all content securely stored in the UK, via primary and secondary datacentres in the UK, based respectively in London and Cardiff.UK Data Residency “At the Behest of Box’s Customers”The announcement comes “at the behest of Box’s customers at a time of uncertainty surrounding Brexit” and “enables multinational organisations to gain more control over their data residency needs”, the company said.John Sullivan, Chief Information Officer at Virgin Trains, one of Box’s largest UK customers, added in a release: “The UK Zone will give us more choice and control over our content.
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Phones with 48-megapixel cameras are now a thing.In fact, I’ve got one on my desk literally right this second.These handsets are capable of producing bigger and more richer photos.To ensure it’s still easy to upload these humongous pictures to the Internet, Facebook today open-sourced a handy tool called Spectrum.Spectrum is an image processing library for Android and iOS.It aims to improve the reliability of image uploads, while simultaneously making them less demanding on one’s data plan.
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Handy centralised configuration of backup across AWS resourcesAmazon Web Services has launched a new backup management toolkit dubbed AWS Backup that provides a centralised backup console, a set of backup APIs, and a command line interface to manage backups across six core AWS services.The new offering, available now, allows users to automate and consolidate backup tasks previously performed service-by-service, removing the need to create custom scripts and manual processes.It also encrypts data in-transit and at rest using keys managed by the AWS Key Management Service (KMS), the company said.The new offering lets users shift data from a “warm” storage tier backed by Amazon S3 to a lower-cost “cold” storage tier (Glacier) with a restore time of three-five hours.Users can currently use AWS Backup to centrally configure backup policies and monitor backup activity for AWS resources including Elastic Block Storage (EBS), Relational Database Service (RDS), DynamoDB, Elastic File System (EFS) and Storage Gateway.
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China
When Bailey Richardson joined Instagram as head of community in 2012, her team was working out of a small room in California.She was one of the original 13 employees at the company and handled the app’s community strategy and events like InstaMeets.Later that year, Facebook acquired the app, and two years after that, Richardson resigned.She and some of her colleagues believed that the intimacy, artistry, and other factors that made the app what it was in its early days had been lost.But she never got over her love for community building.“However I can do more of this work and supercharge [companies and users] by connecting them is what I want to do.”
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Camera maker Olympus really knows how to tease its fans.It has scheduled three separate and extremely short teasers a week apart to prepare the road for its still to be announced OM-D DSLR.And while Olympus is naturally careful not to reveal any specs, it does at least confirm one property the camera will have: its ability to withstand the elements.Granted, that’s really not much of a mystery considering the three teaser videos released so far.All of them had one thing in common: being used to take photos at sporting events, be it swimming or even racing.You’d, of course expect such a camera to be able to keep up with all the action and the little accidents that may happen while that action takes place.
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UK
The iconic flip phone, which was released first in 2004, defined ‘sexy’ in the gadget world well before the iPhone was a thing.Now, according to a report from Wall Street Journal, Motorola is planning to bring it back in a new foldable avatar.Just know that you might have to shell out around $1,500 to get your hands on it.According to the report, Motorola‘s parent company, Lenovo, is partnering with network provider Verizon to launch these devices in the US.We might get a glimpse of the foldable Razr phone as soon as February.However, the final release might be set for a later date.
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Android has long prided itself for how it allows users to dig into most of the file system, provided they have a file manager app on hand.Of the latter, ES File Explorer was once the cream of the crop for the features it offers.Those features, however, may have come at the price of your privacy and security.A vulnerability has been discovered that apparently gives any hacker worth his or her salt access to a phone with that app installed and all they have to do is sit on the same Wi-Fi network as the phone.The cause of this rather straightforward vulnerability is ES File Explorer’s built-in and hidden web server which runs in the background and exposes port 59777.The app may offer a lot of functionality, including streaming videos or remote access to files, through that web server but the costs it puts on users might be too high to pay.
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Most Facebook users have no idea that the ad biz compiles data profiles of their online activities and interests, according to research conducted by the non-profit Pew Research Center.It's worth recalling that a decade ago, Google representatives stopped people on the street in New York City to ask "What's a web browser?"The finding nonetheless underscores the privacy cost, unrecognized though it may be, of relying on an ad platform for media and messages rather than wrestling with the complexity of self-administered comms software.After surveying 963 US adults last year between September 4 to October 1, Pew researchers found that 74 per cent of Facebook users said they were unaware the social ad biz tracks their traits and interests.Facebook makes such data available to users through the "Your ad preferences" page, but about half of the survey respondents didn't like what they saw once they were made aware of their data trail.Fifty-one per cent of those surveyed said they're not comfortable with Facebook compiling this information.
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Israeli company was 'feeling lucky' but lost outGoogle has won a patent dispute over its famous "I'm feeling lucky" button that immediately connects a user to its top-raking search link with a single click.The search engine giant was sued in 2016 by Israeli company Spring Ventures (previously Buy2 Networks) for allegedly infringing on its patent, US 8,661,094, that covers displaying a web page without extra user input.Soon after it started sending letters to Google insisting that its button infringed at least 14 separate aspects of the patent because it allowed users to reach a webpage without providing a specific URL.That may sound like a harsh putdown but in the rarefied world of patent law, the term "obvious" has a tediously precise meaning.You can read the full decision to find out precisely what it means but we don't recommend it: patent lawyers have habit of turning written English into a gaspingly turgid explanation of a concept.
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After almost two years of wait, Xiaomi has finally launched its flagship smartphone in India.The phone was first showcased at the Mobile World Congress (MWC) 2016 and went on sale in China.The Xiaomi Mi 5 smartphone that packs in Snapdragon 820 CPU, 3GB of RAM, a 16MP Sony sensor and a sleek design that weighs just 129g.In the China market the company is also offering a limited edition ceramic back model, which we will not be seeing in India for now.A connector that works either way up and allows for faster data transfer - plus this phone supports Quick Charge 3.0, so you'll be able to get 90% in charge in under an hour.There is Xiaomi's Beauty Mode, which helps in touching up the pictures and putting it in Hugo Barra's words, "Make handsome men look even more handsome".
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In the wake of a civil lawsuit by T-Mobile and other telecommunications companies against the Chinese networking and telecommunications company Huawei, the US Department of Justice is reportedly conducting a criminal investigation of the company.According to a Wall Street Journal report, the DOJ is close to filing an indictment against Huawei for theft of trade secrets, including the technology used in a robot developed by T-Mobile to test smartphones.The report comes a week after an employee of Huawei was arrested in Poland on espionage charges.And Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou was arrested in Canada in December based on US charges that she was responsible for violations of US sanctions against Iran.In November, the US government began ratcheting up pressure on allies to ban Huawei network hardware from their telecommunications systems over espionage concerns.Huawei has long been suspected of benefitting from Chinese economic espionage and the forced transfer of technologies from foreign companies doing business in China.
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Facial recognition technology has progressed to a point where it now interprets emotions in facial expressions.This type of analysis is increasingly used in daily life.For example, companies can use facial recognition software to help with hiring decisions.Other programs scan the faces in crowds to identify threats to public safety.My new study, published last month, shows emotional analysis technology assigns more negative emotions to black men’s faces than white men’s faces.Facial recognition programs struggled to correctly identify gender for people with darker skin.
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China
What happened: Chinese online retailer Suning.com is planning to open 15,000 offline stores in 2019.It is also promoting smart retail solutions in its massive sales networks across 350 domestic cities.Zhang Jindong, chairman of the Suning Group, described its grocery stores as the pathfinder in the company’s “Great Development” plan, aiming to drive businesses in Chinese neighborhoods and rural markets.Why it’s important: Founded by Zhang Jindong and his elder brother in 1990, Suning is China’s largest omnichannel retailer with more than 10,000 offline stores nationwide, including shopping centers, consumer electronics outlets, and community stores.According to Chinese media, e-commerce giant Alibaba held a 20% stake in Suning in 2016.It later helped Suning-affiliate Suning Sports complete a $600 million round of fundraising in June 2018.
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I’m generally wary of wearable tech, because a lot of ‘innovation’ in the space is geared towards jamming unnecessary circuitry and functionality into articles of clothing that work just fine without them.Case in point: notifications on smartwatches (come fight me, but only after you read this).But maybe there’s some sense in adding tech to apparel yet.With its new Adapt BB, Nike’s created a basketball shoe that can tighten or loosen itself to fit your foot just right – no laces necessary.You can use an app or buttons on the soles to adjust the tightness, and recall your favorite settings for them from your phone.As Eric Avar, VP & creative director at Nike Innovation, told The Verge, the broader vision is for such shoes to become smart enough to detect your blood pressure and automatically adjust themselves so you’re comfortable even when your feet are swollen from strenuous physical activity.
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UK
It's a great time to be a fan of science fiction, fantasy, and all those other nerdy genres that used be considered unappealing to the mass market.The only problem is most of them are being produced by American TV networks, and there's no telling if and when they'll be available elsewhere.Netflix and Amazon pick up a lot, but there's only so much they're willing to pick up.The good news is that Nightflyers, the adaptation of George RR Martin's 1980 novella, is one of them.Netflix has announced that it will be distributing the series internationally, which includes the UK, and that the first series will be available to view in its entirety on 1st February.That's 10 episodes for those trying to plan out their binge-watching schedule.
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