David Rodriguez

David Rodriguez

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Autonomous cars are changing all of the rules, so ZF decided to go full "Pimp My Ride" by putting a 7-inch touchscreen with gesture control into a steering wheel.German automotive technology firm ZF is pretty sure it can improve the functionality of the humble steering wheel, not by adding a gaggle of physical buttons and switches, as in many race cars, but by adding capacitive sensors around the rim and a 7-inch LCD touchscreen in the center, in addition to a host of LED lights.ZF envisions this steering wheel as being a more natural way to control various functions in future self-driving vehicles, making it easier for car and driver to trade off control.Putting a screen in the middle of a steering wheel is not as simple as it sounds.Finding a way to not only make room for the requisite airbags but finding a way to deploy them in such a way that they don't destroy your fancy screen required some serious figuring by Germans in short sleeve dress shirts and likely very thick glasses.They figured out a way to make the airbag deploy from the rear of the rim of the wheel and wrap around, protecting the driver's face from the screen (and vice versa).
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On Wednesday, T-Mobile announced that it plans to launch an internet TV service sometime in 2018.“We’re gonna build TV for people who love TV, Legere said.The more you pay, the more content you receive.YouTube and Hulu, meanwhile, hope that their respective $35 and $40 monthly subscription prices will be enough to compensate for any channels that they might lack.T-Mobile’s TV service will include a cloud DVR to let you watch shows after they’ve aired live.Again, this isn’t a feature that existing services have at the moment.
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If you’re a Firefox user, then you may have noticed a weird new extension that suddenly showed up in your browser this week.The extension is called “Looking Glass 1.0.3” and this is its description: MY REALITY IS JUST DIFFERENT FROM YOURS.It’s a promotional campaign between Firefox and the TV series Mr.Robot that brings an alternate reality game to your browser.This must have sounded like a great idea when somebody pitched it to Mozilla, but the backlash has been fierce.Robot and Mozilla brands, after all (or so I assume based on what I’ve heard; I’ve only seen one episode).
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Microsoft is quietly forcing some Windows 10 computers to install a password manager that contains a critical vulnerability almost identical to one disclosed 16 months ago that allows websites to steal passwords, a researcher said Friday.Google Project Zero researcher Tavis Ormandy said in a blog post that the Keeper Password Manager came pre-installed on a newly built Windows 10 system derived directly from the Microsoft Developer Network.When he tested the unwanted app, he soon found it contained a critical flaw he had found in August 2016 in the non-bundled version of Keeper.The bug, he said, represents "a complete compromise of Keeper security, allowing any website to steal any password."With only basic changes to "selectors," the old proof-of-concept exploit worked on the version installed without notice or permission on his Windows 10 system.Ormandy's post linked to this publicly available proof-of-concept exploit, which steals an end user's Twitter password if it's stored in the Keeper app.
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Oath's UK managing director Nigel Clarkson has left the company following an internal investigation prompted by “complaints and allegations” from employees.A statement from the Verizon Wireless-owned media giant confirmed that “Clarkson’s employment has been terminated” following the conclusion of an internal inquiry “into alleged breaches of our standards of business conduct and our Oath values.”The statement goes on to read: “Oath is a values led company and we take all complaints and allegations from our employees extremely seriously and we move fast to act on them.”No more details surrounding his exit have emerged publicly at present.Clarkson joined Yahoo as its UK managing director in November 2015 prior to its takeover by Verizon Wireless and subsequent merger with AOL resulting in the newly-formed outfit Oath.
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In 2014, the Global Strategy Group released a survey that found that 56 percent of Americans believed corporations “should stand up for what they believe politically,” and that’s a big number.In overwhelming numbers, America’s largest and most influential brands made their positions on a range of socio-political issues clear—at times brutally so.And while companies have taken controversial stands in years past—Walmart taking a stance on sustainability 12 years ago or Disney adding domestic-partner benefits as early as 1995—this year was clearly different in another respect: Not only did brands take highly public policy stances, but most of them took the form of active and direct opposition to the President of the United States.Brands converge over the travel banAs though the Expedia people knew something others did not, a mere week after the inauguration, President Donald Trump issued the first of what would become several travel bans.— Chad Dickerson (@chaddickerson) January 28, 2017
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As far back as early 2015, Braben has been answering our repeated questions of "Where are the Thargoids?!"We don’t go to the Pleiades2014's Elite Dangerous has its share of mysteries, and biggest among them are the Thargoids, who appear to focus their activities around the Pleiades cluster.First encountered in 1984's Elite in their massively powerful and difficult-to-kill hexagonal spacecraft, the series' lore says that humans were only able to defeat the technologically superior aliens via a biological weapon called the mycoid virus.Almost a year ago, reports began to surface from players who had been ripped out of hyperspace by unknown enormous spacecraft that appeared impervious to all conventional attacks.As indicated in the lore, the Thargoids stuck to the space around the Pleiades cluster.
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These hubs vary dramatically according to their objectives and country context, but all help to build, galvanise and upskill tech communities in-country.They run a range of activities including training, events, networking opportunities and mentorship and create a collaborative environment which supports both social innovation and the establishment of commercial start-ups.We asked hub staff in seven hubs across five countries in Sub-Saharan Africa to explain how they are addressing some of these challenges and generating revenue.Why donor funds are neededWhile most hubs have diverse revenue streams, to a large extent, they still depend on donor income.This enables them to pursue social goals such as upskilling their communities, supporting social innovation and running less profitable programmes like coding schools and 'women in tech' initiatives.
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Imagine if the sun's energy could be harnessed to power energy needs on Earth, and done in a way that is economical, scalable, and environmentally responsible.Researchers have long seen this as one of the grand challenges of the 21st century.Daniel Esposito, assistant professor of chemical engineering at Columbia Engineering, has been studying water electrolysis?the splitting of water into oxygen (O2) and hydrogen (H2) fuel?as a way to convert electricity from solar photovoltaics (PVs) into storable hydrogen fuel.Hydrogen is a clean fuel that is currently used to propel rockets in NASA's space program and is widely expected to play an important role in a sustainable energy future.The vast majority of today's hydrogen is produced from natural gas through a process called steam methane reforming that simultaneously releases CO2, but water electrolysis using electricity from solar PV offers a promising route to produce H2 without any associated CO2 emissions.Based on the concept of buoyancy-induced separation, the simple electrolyzer architecture produces H2 with purity as high as 99 percent.
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Matt Damon has come under fire again after weighing in on the ongoing sexual harassment allegations being made against key figures in Hollywood.The ‘Downsizing’ actor, who has hit headlines previously for his comments on the Harvey Weinstein scandal, this time shared his view that when it comes to sexual misconduct, he feels there is a “spectrum” on which certain behaviour falls.“I do believe that there’s a spectrum of behavior, right?” he added, “And we’re going to have to figure... you know, there’s a difference between, you know, patting someone on the butt and rape or child molestation, right?Steve Granitz via Getty ImagesOn what he called “the Louis C.K.There’s no braggadocio … So they don’t belong in the same category.”
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In all my time at TNW, I don’t think I’ve ever written a blog about a podcast I’ve been listening to, but hear me out.This week, it’s been following StartupBus: a five-day hackathon on wheels, where coders build new companies while making their way from New York City to New Orleans.And yes, it’s my current podcast obsession.What struck me the most is that, as someone who has participated in several hackathons, everything sounded really familiar to me.Sure, the setting was different; most hackathons I’ve experienced took place in unheated function rooms or offices, not six-wheeled busses.But the mundane stuff could have happened anywhere.
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... and companies need to share their info nicelyThe UK needs high-quality, standardised and more open data to improve its national infrastructure – and companies need to get used to sharing, a report has said.The National Infrastructure Commission, chaired by Andrew Adonis, was tasked with assessing the data the UK holds and how it can make better use of it.These include cutting train delays and traffic jams through better planned maintenance and repairs through sensor networks, and increasing competition between telcos by sharing data on signal and connection speeds.Long-term data collection will inform how infrastructure is built, managed and decommissioned, while real-time data will improve day-to-day operations, the report said.Instead, the commission focuses on the idea that – if the UK's data is to be useful – it must be treated as a fundamental resource that will only provide value if it is properly managed and maintained.
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After years of talks Sky and BT have come to an agreement to sell each other’s channels on their TV platforms.The deal means Sky will be able to market and sell the BT Sport service, boasting Premier League and Champions League football, to its customers directly through one single Sky contract.In return, Sky’s full Now TV streaming service will become available on the BT TV set-top-box, opening up the full Sky Sports range along with Sky Atlantic, Sky One, Sky Living and Sky Cinema to BT viewers.The so-called “cross supply” agreement represents a breakthrough after years of acrimony and on-off negotiations between the fierce rivals.Both parties have hailed it as a victory for their distribution and content strategies.Jeremy Darroch, group chief executive of Sky, said: “This is all part of our stated strategy to enhance our customer offering, to broaden our appeal and to open up new revenue streams for our business.”
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We’ve been waiting a long time for a phone with a fingerprint scanner built into the screen and it looks like Vivo is going to be the first to launch one, and that it will be coming very soon.Just a few days ago Synaptics announced an in-screen scanner, and while mentions of things like ‘OLED’, ‘infinity display’ and ‘top five’ smartphone vendor in the press release made it sound a lot like the Samsung Galaxy S9 would be the first to use it, it’s actually Vivo according to Forbes.This isn’t entirely surprising though, given that a leak earlier this year showed the Vivo Xplay 7 as having an in-screen scanner, so that might well be on the way.And it sounds like the scanner might work well.Forbes claims the scanner was fast and simple, though notably in its pre-production form it did require waking up the screen with a button press before using it – a step which will hopefully be removed by the time it hits the market.According to Synaptics it’s also apparently faster and cheaper than Face ID, so you might not have to spend a small fortune to get a phone with an in-screen scanner.
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As Marvin Ammori, lawyer for the advocacy group Fight for the Future told Motherboard:The average person goes to Coinbase to buy Bitcoin, Ethereum, or Litecoin—the average on-ramp is an exchange, and those are easy to block.For one, ISPs may decide (or bend under government pressure) to effectively end cryptocurrency by shutting off access to make deposits or withdrawals from popular (and trustworthy) exchanges.I don’t think we need to re-live Mt.Or, another interesting idea: ISPs could decide to issue their own coins and prioritize transactions by running them through approved exchanges.Comcoin, for example, might offer a discounted way to pay for your new “Platinum Tier” internet package that offers 130 websites, plus Comcast’s premium cable offering for the low, low price of just $229 a month — $199 if paid for with Comcoin.
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Yet all too often, these same people let their potential go unfulfilled because they think they’re not quite ready for the responsibilities that come with starting a business.However, these things probably aren’t going to change if you decide to wait a few years before starting your entrepreneurial journey.When you love your idea, you’ll be working for much more than the mere motive of making money.While improving your finances is certainly important, those who identify a higher purpose in their work or simply love what they do are far more likely to achieve success.This will make it easier to come up with creative insights to improve your product while also ensuring that you have the stamina to work long hours and learn from setbacks.2) You understand the market and the risks
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The compressed timelines of this year’s open enrollment period for government-mandated healthcare have left some companies in the lurch, and as the final hours to enroll tick by, they’ve turned to the startup company Stride Health for help.Stride manages a number of different tax and healthcare-related information for customers, including Uber, Etsy, Postmates, TaskRabbit, Instacart, DoorDash, Care.com and Homebase.Now a clutch of other gig economy companies, like Fiverr, Dribbble, Bonsai, HoneyBook, Samaschool and Wonolo have signed up for the service — and the motivating factor is healthcare, according to chief executive Noah Lang.“The government is spending less this year to promote the importance of having health insurance, so these companies have taken it upon themselves to make sure people get covered,” said Lang, Stride’s co-founder and chief executive, in a statement.Indeed, many of the recent additions to Stride’s customer base signed up in the last two weeks to ensure that they could help the freelancers on their platforms get the healthcare coverage they need.Since its launch four years ago, Stride has built a reputation as the easiest way to find affordable healthcare plans and subsidies that reduce the price of coverage.
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If Cherry Blossom Red makes you go all wobbly in the knees, and you've been on the fence about buying a new Subaru, then zip over to your local dealership and hope you got there in time to buy two of the rarest production Scoobys to hit our shores.When Subaru announced the WRX STI Type RA and the BRZ tS earlier this year, people went a little nuts, and it's easy to understand why given that the Japanese manufacturer only plans to build 500 examples of each.The WRX STI Type RA is a lot like a regular STI, but one that stole its little brother's ADD meds and drinks only energy drinks of questionable legality.The folks at STI took the standard car and went about lightweighting it, tuning the suspension within an inch of its life, and making changes inside the venerable EJ25 motor such as fitting it with stronger pistons and tweaking the ECU.Then they went crazy with STI pink (sorry, Cherry Blossom Red) on the badges and trim pieces, and the result is the rawest STI that America has ever seen and an MSRP of a little over $50,000 after destination.The BRZ tS -- tS standing for "tuned by STI" -- is a little less zany than its all-wheel-drive sibling.
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IBM's quantum computers have taken a step out of the lab and into the real world as Samsung, Daimler, Honda, JP Morgan Chase, Barclays and others have signed up to use the exotic machines for research.Now IBM is betting quantum computing will be one of the next big businesses.The partnerships with big-name global corporations, announced Thursday, show some powerful customers are willing to pay to come along for the ride.If successful, quantum computing could help solve new types of computing problems, breathing new life into an industry that today is struggling against hard physical limits to making computer chips faster, cheaper and smaller.For decades, that miniaturization trend, called Moore's Law, kept the computing industry's economic engine humming, but the hunt is on for longer-term technologies that will keep the progress coming to us all.Instead of storing data in bits that can record either a 1 or a 0, quantum computers use qubits that can record both 0 and 1 through a wacky quantum-physics phenomenon called superposition.
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FCC Chairman Ajit Pai might be the villain du jour, but it’s important to remember that he didn’t act alone.Below you’ll find a list of all his accomplices and how much they received from telecoms during their last election cycle.Think of it as a handy cheat sheet detailing who not to vote for in 2018 — if you’re still salty about net neutrality, anyway.All credit goes to The Verge for compiling the list.Up for grabs are all 435 seats in the House of Representatives as well as 33 (8 of which voted against net neutrality — in bold) in the Senate.Our hope is certainly to remove those that voted to end net neutrality, but no one is saying you have to replace them with someone of the opposite party.
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