Gaston Alexander

Gaston Alexander

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The GPS on your trusted smartphone br is a modern miracle, but it’s often far from perfect.We’ve all had Google Maps tell us that we are somehow walking or driving right between two streets.Especially now that the holiday season is fast approaching, poor GPS performance on your phone probably would totally ruin the vacation .And Ulefone wants to show us that such issue is definitely not the case with their new Ulefone Armor 2 model so they put together a GPS performance test video with this phone.Check it out below :Ulefone Armor 2 is the true rugged phone with the IP68 certification, 5-inch FHD resolution display, Helio P25 processor, 6 GB RAM, 64 GB ROM, 16MP main snapper camera with two tone flash, 13MP selfie shooter, 4700 mAh battery and Android 7.0 Nougat as the OS.And there are several hardware physical buttons on the edges for handy use, like SOS button, PTT button, and shutter button.
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American Express has announced that it will no longer require signatures for credit card purchases beginning in April 2018, joining Discover and Mastercard, which have also announced similar changes.According to Jaromir Divilek, an executive VP at American Express, the company is making the change because its “fraud capabilities have advanced so that signatures are no longer necessary to fight fraud.” The company also cites advances in contactless payments, the explosion of popularity in online shopping, and the buzzword-citing use of “advanced machine learning algorithms” to help prevent fraud more efficiently than comparing a signature.Unlike other card companies, American Express is doing away with signatures globally, instead of just in the US.For comparison, current American Express policy is that customers don’t have to sign for purchases under $50 in the US, under $100 CAD in Canada, or under £30 in the UK.Now that American Express is getting rid of signatures at checkout, that just leaves Visa as the last major US card company that has yet to announce a similar change.
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New submitter Zorro shares a report: Scientists have fantasised for centuries about humans colonising the moon.That day may have drawn a little closer after Japan's space agency said it had discovered an enormous cave beneath the lunar surface that could be turned into an exploration base for astronauts.The discovery, by Japan's Selenological and Engineering Explorer (Selene) probe, comes as several countries vie to follow the US in sending manned missions to the moon.Using a radar sounder system that can examine underground structures, the orbiter initially found an opening 50 metres wide and 50 metres deep, prompting speculation that there could be a larger hollow.This week scientists at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Jaxa) confirmed the presence of a cave after examining the hole using radio waves.The chasm, 50km (31 miles) long and 100 metres wide, appears to be structurally sound and its rocks may contain ice or water deposits that could be turned into fuel, according to data sent back by the orbiter, nicknamed Kaguya after the moon princess in a Japanese fairytale.
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If you bought a Kindle e-book between April 2010 and May 2012, you might see some Amazon credit coming your way.The company is reportedly distributing funds from an antitrust lawsuit that it levied at Apple in 2013.From a report: Amazon has set up a website listing the available credits, and it has begun sending out emails this morning to U.S. customers who are eligible for a refund.Apple and a handful of book publishers, including Penguin, HarperCollins, Machete Book Group and Macmillan, were found guilty of conspiring to inflate the prices of e-books in order to weaken Amazon's grip on the market.While the book publishers settled out of court, Apple decided to fight the lawsuit and appealed several times.Eventually, it was ordered to pay a total of $450 million in the protracted antitrust case.
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Anna Wintour accepted the 2017 Brand Visionary honor earlier tonight at Adweek’s Brand Genius gala awards dinner and thanked her mentor, the late S.I.Wintour was recognized for her broad influence and leadership in both the fashion and publishing realms.“In our ever-changing digital world, the market is chasing what money alone cannot buy: experiences,” Wintour said, addressing a roomful of fellow honorees and attendees at Cipriani 25 Broadway in New York.The Brand Visionary award, the highest honor the magazine bestows, recognizes a career’s worth of accomplishments in building a brand and making lasting contributions to business and the wider culture.Wintour joined Condé Nast in 1980 when she became Vogue’s first creative director, rising to editor in chief in 1988.Her first cover that November featured the now iconic shot of Israeli model Michaela Bercu walking down a street in a pair of Guess jeans.
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Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey admitted on Friday that the company’s minimalist approach to moderation was not working, saying the site is committed to taking a “more aggressive stance in our rules and how to enforce them” in the wake of numerous high-profile public relations nightmares.“We see voices being silenced on Twitter every day,” Dorsey wrote.“We’ve been working to counteract this for the past 2 years.”“... Today we saw voices silencing themselves and voices speaking out because we’re *still* not doing enough,” he continued.“We’ve been working intensely over the past few months and focused today on making some critical decisions.”Dorsey added that the new rules will target “unwanted sexual advances, non-consensual nudity, hate symbols, violent groups, and tweets that glorifies violence” — meaning that perhaps yes, someone is finally going to ban all those swastika-posting Pepes on the site.
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Last year, SRI’s Alexander Kernbaum introduced us to Abacus Drive, a new kind of rotary transmission based on pure rolling motion that promises to be much cheaper and much more energy efficient than harmonic gears, which are the current (and quite expensive) standard.Now Kernbaum is back with another ingenious transmission design: an ultra-compact, infinitely variable transmission based on a novel nested-pulley configuration.This new kind of actuator could make robots—and all kinds of other things—safer, more affordable, and vastly more efficient.In an infinitely variable transmission, which is a specific kind of continuously variable transmission, the transmission ratio includes a zero point that can be approached from either a positive side or a negative side.In other words, a constant input, like an electric motor turning the same direction at the same speed, can be converted to an output that’s turning faster, turning slower, turning in the opposite direction, or not turning at all (in this “geared neutral” mode, you’d need infinite input revolutions to cause one output revolution, hence the name “infinitely variable transmission”).If you can’t quite understand how it works from the video (and even Kernbaum admits that it’s difficult to visualize), read the explanation here: Inception Drive: A Compact, Infinitely Variable Transmission for Robotics
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Many support a concept called responsible encryption, which, the idea goes, would provide complete privacy and security for people while also letting law enforcement see encrypted messages to better protect you.Yet the concept continues to rear its head.The most recent responsible-encryption advocate is US Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein.During a speech to the US Naval Academy on Tuesday, Rosenstein called out tech companies for refusing to help with uncovering private messages."Responsible encryption can protect privacy and promote security without forfeiting access for legitimate law enforcement needs supported by judicial approval," he said, according to a transcript.Officials in Australia and the UK have also called for responsible encryption, despite the fact that both governments have suffered major breaches that shatter the concept.
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Google has decided to “permanently remove” the feature that led to a “small number” of Home Mini units accidentally recording thousands of times a day, instead of just when a user triggers it.In a statement released today, the company said that it made the decision because “we want people to have complete peace of mind while using Google Home Mini.”The Home Mini shipped with a feature that let owners activate the Google Assistant and control music by tapping the top of the speaker.But it turned out that some units had an issue: they would register touches even when no one was there, leading the units to start recording over and over and over again, which is pretty darn creepy.Android Police identified the error on one of its review units, and Google resolved the problem before any Home Mini units could actually ship out to customers (aside from however many it gave out at events).The software fix is supposed to be rolled out October 15th, a few days before the Mini ships.
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Hackers stole the driver's license information of more than 10 million Americans from Equifax, the Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday.That's in addition to the Social Security numbers and other personal details about 145.5 million Americans hackers took from Equifax's systems.The company said the stolen data included driver's license information, but didn't say for how many people.What's more, Equifax said Tuesday that 15.2 million records on more than nearly 700,000 UK consumers were also compromised.Information from driver's licenses include home addresses and driver's heights and weights, not to mention the driver's license numbers.These pieces of information would make a potential identity thief's job even easier.
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"I was trained more as a linguist than a computer scientist," says Perl creator Larry Wall, "and some people would say it shows."An anonymous reader describes Wall's new video interview up on InfoQ: "With a natural language, you learn it as you go," Wall says.It's okay to have dialects... Natural languages evolve over time, and they don't have arbitrary limits.There are external influences on style...It has fractal dimensionality to it.Easy things should be easy, hard things should be possible.
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That was certainly evident at this years’ Nordic Digital Business Summit, where IoT was at the top of the agenda.The connected world is big and beautiful, those who are smart enough can start creating money out of thin air.This was one of the conclusions made when your correspondent got the chance to host a discussion with Aalto University’s Jarno Limnéll and Tieto Security Services’ Timo Ahomäki.“The problem with security is us, not the technology which is out there.”“When you look at WannaCry, this was stuff we knew about a decade ago,” said Ahomäki.Human error is often the downfall of a company’s security features.
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An anonymous reader quotes a report from Bloomberg: Equifax's board of directors has formed a special committee to review the stock sales that top executives made days after the company found out it was hacked.Directors at Equifax have retained counsel and are conducting a "thorough review" of the trades, according to a Sept. 28 letter the company's outside lawyers submitted to the top Democrat on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.The examination adds to investigations already being conducted by federal law-enforcement agencies."Equifax takes these matters seriously," the company said in its response to questions posed by Democrats on the panel, led by Frank Pallone, from New Jersey."The board of directors has formed a special committee," according to the letter, addressed to Pallone and obtained by Bloomberg News.The trades, which were first reported by Bloomberg, involve Equifax CFO John Gamble, President of U.S. Information Solutions Joseph Loughran and President of Workforce Solutions Rodolfo Ploder.
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Rep. Ted Lieu (D-Los Angeles) is a naturalized American citizen, having emigrated from Taiwan as a young child.Earlier this month, under a new proposed policy, the Department of Homeland Security said it will begin collecting public social media information about immigrants—possibly also green card holders and naturalized citizens—and include them as part of their so-called "Alien File."Because of this ambiguity, Rep. Lieu—who is very active on Twitter—has a basic question in a Friday letter for Acting DHS Secretary Elaine Duke: "Does your proposed rule apply to me?"Lieu, who said he has lived in the United States for over four decades and who holds the rank of colonel in the United States Air Force Reserves, also raised concerns that if enacted, the rule will be ineffective.Why does he think this?Because DHS’ own inspector general report found in February 2017 that previous "social media screening" pilot programs "lack criteria for measuring performance to ensure they meet their objectives."
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Photographs are becoming a fundamental part of public relations and other communication vehicles.With the internet serving as a global newsroom, adding professional photos will enhance your news and create visibility for your story.Want to enrich the appearance of your company's materials by adding eye-catching photos?For example, if your company announces the addition of a new executive, headshots of those involved in the personnel change should be included.What are the requirements for publication-ready photos and how can you increase the chances of reprints?Hennes: Obviously, photos shot by professionals have the best chance of getting picked up.
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it's hard to know where to focus your marketing time and dollars.Everywhere I turn lately, I've come across tips for how to do innovative marketing this year.So I've collected a short list of my favorite tips.Do you send customers an email that makes additional offers after they abandon a shopping cart on your website, or maybe an email that provides free information?Find out what customers want by texting them a question.This one's particularly useful for those Gen-X and -Y customers, many of whom don't seem to use email anymore.
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I see other agency founders who started later and have bigger teams.I see other consulting firms growing faster while we’re grinding it out to hit our number.It’s easy to look at their success and fret about whether my growth, my success, my margins are good enough.Their success (or lack thereof) doesn’t at all affect what I can do, have done, or will do.Only you get to define what your success is, what it looks like, how it is defined.A couple weeks ago I met a newly-minted entrepreneur at Content Marketing World.
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In an article published today in the journal Science, the Pierre Auger Collaboration has definitively answered the question of whether cosmic particles from outside the Milky Way Galaxy.The article, titled "Observation of a large-scale anisotropy in the arrival directions of cosmic rays above 8 × 1018 eV", notes that studying the distribution of the cosmic ray arrival directions is the first step in determining where extragalactic particles originate.The collaborating scientists were able to make their recordings using the largest cosmic-ray observatory ever built, the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina.Included in this collaboration are David Nitz and Brian Fick, professors of physics at Michigan Technological University."We are now considerably closer to solving the mystery of where and how these extraordinary particles are created, a question of great interest to astrophysicists," says Karl-Heinz Kampert, a professor at the University of Wuppertal in Germany and spokesperson for the Auger Collaboration, which involves more than 400 scientists from 18 countries.It's extremely rare for cosmic rays with energy greater than two joules to reach Earth; the rate of their arrival at the top of the atmosphere is only about one per square kilometer per year, the equivalent to one cosmic ray hitting an area the size of a soccer field about once per century.
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Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg has personally intervened in a hate speech advertising row which engulfed the social media company last week, when it emerged it had been inadvertently soliciting anti-Semitic advertisers.Taking personal ownership of the scandal in a Facebook post Sandberg wrote that she was “disgusted and disappointed” that offensive slurs such as ‘Jew-hater’ and ‘how to burn Jews’ were amongst the targeting options Facebook had offered to potential advertisers.Writing on the social network Sandberg wrote: “Seeing those words made me disgusted and disappointed – disgusted by these sentiments and disappointed that our systems allowed this.Hate has no place on Facebook – and as a Jew, as a mother, and as a human being, I know the damage that can come from hate.The fact that hateful terms were even offered as options was totally inappropriate and a fail on our part.”Defending the concept of ad targeting Sandberg went onto announce a three-step overhaul of the platforms policies and tools to prevent a repeat of the embarrassing oversight, beginning with a tightening of advertising policies and tougher enforcement of community standards.
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Research suggests maybe the heavy ones should spend less time over peopleBeing hit in the head by a drone won't necessarily end in decapitation.Thanks to aeronautical boffins, we know now that there is a range of possible outcomes.Not content to let the US Federal Aviation Administration ponder drone drubbings – something the agency did in April – researchers from Virginia Tech and State University have come to some very unsurprising conclusions about drone injury scenarios, albeit under the imprimatur of a peer-reviewed journal.The research, titled "Ranges of Injury Risk Associated with Impact from Unmanned Aircraft Systems," published this month in the Annals of Biomedical Engineering, examines what happens when drones of varying weights – DJI Phantom 3, DJI Inspire 1, and DJI S1000+, ranging from 1.2kg (2.6lb) to 11kg (24.3lb) – fly into and are dropped on people's heads.The US domestic drones accident database mostly documents property damage, but it also contains accounts of injuries.
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