Gaston Alexander

Gaston Alexander

Followers 7
Following 11
UK
Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey admitted on Friday that the company’s minimalist approach to moderation was not working, saying the site is committed to taking a “more aggressive stance in our rules and how to enforce them” in the wake of numerous high-profile public relations nightmares.“We see voices being silenced on Twitter every day,” Dorsey wrote.“We’ve been working to counteract this for the past 2 years.”“... Today we saw voices silencing themselves and voices speaking out because we’re *still* not doing enough,” he continued.“We’ve been working intensely over the past few months and focused today on making some critical decisions.”Dorsey added that the new rules will target “unwanted sexual advances, non-consensual nudity, hate symbols, violent groups, and tweets that glorifies violence” — meaning that perhaps yes, someone is finally going to ban all those swastika-posting Pepes on the site.
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Last year, SRI’s Alexander Kernbaum introduced us to Abacus Drive, a new kind of rotary transmission based on pure rolling motion that promises to be much cheaper and much more energy efficient than harmonic gears, which are the current (and quite expensive) standard.Now Kernbaum is back with another ingenious transmission design: an ultra-compact, infinitely variable transmission based on a novel nested-pulley configuration.This new kind of actuator could make robots—and all kinds of other things—safer, more affordable, and vastly more efficient.In an infinitely variable transmission, which is a specific kind of continuously variable transmission, the transmission ratio includes a zero point that can be approached from either a positive side or a negative side.In other words, a constant input, like an electric motor turning the same direction at the same speed, can be converted to an output that’s turning faster, turning slower, turning in the opposite direction, or not turning at all (in this “geared neutral” mode, you’d need infinite input revolutions to cause one output revolution, hence the name “infinitely variable transmission”).If you can’t quite understand how it works from the video (and even Kernbaum admits that it’s difficult to visualize), read the explanation here: Inception Drive: A Compact, Infinitely Variable Transmission for Robotics
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Many support a concept called responsible encryption, which, the idea goes, would provide complete privacy and security for people while also letting law enforcement see encrypted messages to better protect you.Yet the concept continues to rear its head.The most recent responsible-encryption advocate is US Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein.During a speech to the US Naval Academy on Tuesday, Rosenstein called out tech companies for refusing to help with uncovering private messages."Responsible encryption can protect privacy and promote security without forfeiting access for legitimate law enforcement needs supported by judicial approval," he said, according to a transcript.Officials in Australia and the UK have also called for responsible encryption, despite the fact that both governments have suffered major breaches that shatter the concept.
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Google has decided to “permanently remove” the feature that led to a “small number” of Home Mini units accidentally recording thousands of times a day, instead of just when a user triggers it.In a statement released today, the company said that it made the decision because “we want people to have complete peace of mind while using Google Home Mini.”The Home Mini shipped with a feature that let owners activate the Google Assistant and control music by tapping the top of the speaker.But it turned out that some units had an issue: they would register touches even when no one was there, leading the units to start recording over and over and over again, which is pretty darn creepy.Android Police identified the error on one of its review units, and Google resolved the problem before any Home Mini units could actually ship out to customers (aside from however many it gave out at events).The software fix is supposed to be rolled out October 15th, a few days before the Mini ships.
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Hackers stole the driver's license information of more than 10 million Americans from Equifax, the Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday.That's in addition to the Social Security numbers and other personal details about 145.5 million Americans hackers took from Equifax's systems.The company said the stolen data included driver's license information, but didn't say for how many people.What's more, Equifax said Tuesday that 15.2 million records on more than nearly 700,000 UK consumers were also compromised.Information from driver's licenses include home addresses and driver's heights and weights, not to mention the driver's license numbers.These pieces of information would make a potential identity thief's job even easier.
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"I was trained more as a linguist than a computer scientist," says Perl creator Larry Wall, "and some people would say it shows."An anonymous reader describes Wall's new video interview up on InfoQ: "With a natural language, you learn it as you go," Wall says.It's okay to have dialects... Natural languages evolve over time, and they don't have arbitrary limits.There are external influences on style...It has fractal dimensionality to it.Easy things should be easy, hard things should be possible.
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That was certainly evident at this years’ Nordic Digital Business Summit, where IoT was at the top of the agenda.The connected world is big and beautiful, those who are smart enough can start creating money out of thin air.This was one of the conclusions made when your correspondent got the chance to host a discussion with Aalto University’s Jarno Limnéll and Tieto Security Services’ Timo Ahomäki.“The problem with security is us, not the technology which is out there.”“When you look at WannaCry, this was stuff we knew about a decade ago,” said Ahomäki.Human error is often the downfall of a company’s security features.
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An anonymous reader quotes a report from Bloomberg: Equifax's board of directors has formed a special committee to review the stock sales that top executives made days after the company found out it was hacked.Directors at Equifax have retained counsel and are conducting a "thorough review" of the trades, according to a Sept. 28 letter the company's outside lawyers submitted to the top Democrat on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.The examination adds to investigations already being conducted by federal law-enforcement agencies."Equifax takes these matters seriously," the company said in its response to questions posed by Democrats on the panel, led by Frank Pallone, from New Jersey."The board of directors has formed a special committee," according to the letter, addressed to Pallone and obtained by Bloomberg News.The trades, which were first reported by Bloomberg, involve Equifax CFO John Gamble, President of U.S. Information Solutions Joseph Loughran and President of Workforce Solutions Rodolfo Ploder.
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Rep. Ted Lieu (D-Los Angeles) is a naturalized American citizen, having emigrated from Taiwan as a young child.Earlier this month, under a new proposed policy, the Department of Homeland Security said it will begin collecting public social media information about immigrants—possibly also green card holders and naturalized citizens—and include them as part of their so-called "Alien File."Because of this ambiguity, Rep. Lieu—who is very active on Twitter—has a basic question in a Friday letter for Acting DHS Secretary Elaine Duke: "Does your proposed rule apply to me?"Lieu, who said he has lived in the United States for over four decades and who holds the rank of colonel in the United States Air Force Reserves, also raised concerns that if enacted, the rule will be ineffective.Why does he think this?Because DHS’ own inspector general report found in February 2017 that previous "social media screening" pilot programs "lack criteria for measuring performance to ensure they meet their objectives."
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Photographs are becoming a fundamental part of public relations and other communication vehicles.With the internet serving as a global newsroom, adding professional photos will enhance your news and create visibility for your story.Want to enrich the appearance of your company's materials by adding eye-catching photos?For example, if your company announces the addition of a new executive, headshots of those involved in the personnel change should be included.What are the requirements for publication-ready photos and how can you increase the chances of reprints?Hennes: Obviously, photos shot by professionals have the best chance of getting picked up.
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it's hard to know where to focus your marketing time and dollars.Everywhere I turn lately, I've come across tips for how to do innovative marketing this year.So I've collected a short list of my favorite tips.Do you send customers an email that makes additional offers after they abandon a shopping cart on your website, or maybe an email that provides free information?Find out what customers want by texting them a question.This one's particularly useful for those Gen-X and -Y customers, many of whom don't seem to use email anymore.
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I see other agency founders who started later and have bigger teams.I see other consulting firms growing faster while we’re grinding it out to hit our number.It’s easy to look at their success and fret about whether my growth, my success, my margins are good enough.Their success (or lack thereof) doesn’t at all affect what I can do, have done, or will do.Only you get to define what your success is, what it looks like, how it is defined.A couple weeks ago I met a newly-minted entrepreneur at Content Marketing World.
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In an article published today in the journal Science, the Pierre Auger Collaboration has definitively answered the question of whether cosmic particles from outside the Milky Way Galaxy.The article, titled "Observation of a large-scale anisotropy in the arrival directions of cosmic rays above 8 × 1018 eV", notes that studying the distribution of the cosmic ray arrival directions is the first step in determining where extragalactic particles originate.The collaborating scientists were able to make their recordings using the largest cosmic-ray observatory ever built, the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina.Included in this collaboration are David Nitz and Brian Fick, professors of physics at Michigan Technological University."We are now considerably closer to solving the mystery of where and how these extraordinary particles are created, a question of great interest to astrophysicists," says Karl-Heinz Kampert, a professor at the University of Wuppertal in Germany and spokesperson for the Auger Collaboration, which involves more than 400 scientists from 18 countries.It's extremely rare for cosmic rays with energy greater than two joules to reach Earth; the rate of their arrival at the top of the atmosphere is only about one per square kilometer per year, the equivalent to one cosmic ray hitting an area the size of a soccer field about once per century.
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Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg has personally intervened in a hate speech advertising row which engulfed the social media company last week, when it emerged it had been inadvertently soliciting anti-Semitic advertisers.Taking personal ownership of the scandal in a Facebook post Sandberg wrote that she was “disgusted and disappointed” that offensive slurs such as ‘Jew-hater’ and ‘how to burn Jews’ were amongst the targeting options Facebook had offered to potential advertisers.Writing on the social network Sandberg wrote: “Seeing those words made me disgusted and disappointed – disgusted by these sentiments and disappointed that our systems allowed this.Hate has no place on Facebook – and as a Jew, as a mother, and as a human being, I know the damage that can come from hate.The fact that hateful terms were even offered as options was totally inappropriate and a fail on our part.”Defending the concept of ad targeting Sandberg went onto announce a three-step overhaul of the platforms policies and tools to prevent a repeat of the embarrassing oversight, beginning with a tightening of advertising policies and tougher enforcement of community standards.
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Research suggests maybe the heavy ones should spend less time over peopleBeing hit in the head by a drone won't necessarily end in decapitation.Thanks to aeronautical boffins, we know now that there is a range of possible outcomes.Not content to let the US Federal Aviation Administration ponder drone drubbings – something the agency did in April – researchers from Virginia Tech and State University have come to some very unsurprising conclusions about drone injury scenarios, albeit under the imprimatur of a peer-reviewed journal.The research, titled "Ranges of Injury Risk Associated with Impact from Unmanned Aircraft Systems," published this month in the Annals of Biomedical Engineering, examines what happens when drones of varying weights – DJI Phantom 3, DJI Inspire 1, and DJI S1000+, ranging from 1.2kg (2.6lb) to 11kg (24.3lb) – fly into and are dropped on people's heads.The US domestic drones accident database mostly documents property damage, but it also contains accounts of injuries.
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An anonymous reader shares a Gizmodo report (condensed for space): For nearly two weeks, the company's official Twitter account has been directing users to a fake lookalike website.After announcing the breach, Equifax directed its customers to equifaxsecurity2017.com, a website where they can enroll in identity theft protection services and find updates about how Equifax is handing the "cybersecurity incident."But the decision to create "equifaxsecurity2017" in the first place was monumentally stupid.The URL is long and it doesn't look very official -- that means it's going to be very easy to emulate.To illustrate how idiotic Equifax's decision was, developer Nick Sweeting created a fake website of his own: securityequifax2017.com.(He simply switched the words "security" and "equifax" around.)
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schwit1 writes: NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has observed a planet outside our solar system that looks as black as fresh asphalt because it eats light rather than reflecting it back into space.This light-eating prowess is due to the planet's unique capability to trap at least 94 percent of the visible starlight falling into its atmosphere.The oddball exoplanet, called WASP-12b, is one of a class of so-called "hot Jupiters," gigantic, gaseous planets that orbit very close to their host star and are heated to extreme temperatures.The planet's atmosphere is so hot that most molecules are unable to survive on the blistering day side of the planet, where the temperature is 4,600 degrees Fahrenheit.Therefore, clouds probably cannot form to reflect light back into space.Instead, incoming light penetrates deep into the planet's atmosphere where it is absorbed by hydrogen atoms and converted to heat energy.
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Oh my, press can be such a harsh critic don’t you think?China never really “loved” Samsung’s products all these years and not even the almighty Galaxy Note8 can change that!According to recent report by “Business Korea”, the Chinese media is criticizing the Samsung’s latest flagship every day, especially its REALLY low presale numbers that seem disappointing.So far it seems that Apple’s iPhone 8 (yes the one that has nothing to show when compared to the previous model) already has 4 million preorders in China, while at the same time, Samsung’s Galaxy Note8 has managed to receive only 20,000 pre-orders so far!We have to note however, that in order to preorder an iPhone, customers in China do not need to make any payment.On the other side, Galaxy Note 8 customers are required to pay 100 Yuan (~$15) to pre-order it.
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The U.S. Federal Trade Commission has noticed celebrities and social stars are weaving branded content into their personal accounts without explicit disclosure, and it has started taking violations of its Endorsement Guides more seriously.The government agency requires social stars to clearly and conspicuously disclose their endorsement relationships with marketers.The FTC recommends hashtags like ad and Impartneringwith[brand], while it deems the likes of “ sp,” “Thanks [brand]” or “ partner” ambiguous.This month, the FTC settled its first case against two social media influencers, Trevor Martin and Thomas Cassell, who endorsed gambling service CSGO Lotto in videos and social media posts, yet failed to disclose they jointly own the company.Meanwhile, the FTC sent warning letters to 21 social users with large Instagram followings, including celebrities Lindsay Lohan and Naomi Campbell.“The action against Martin and Cassell, the most recent influencer warning letters and the updated frequently asked questions [on its website] are further proof that the FTC will bring actions against not only marketers, but also influencers who violate the FTC Endorsement Guides,” said Allison Fitzpatrick, partner at law firm Davis & Gilbert.
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Apple has quietly increased the cost to repair broken screens on the iPhone 6S, 6S Plus, 7 and 7 Plus, as noted by Reddit users over the weekend, raising the price of screen replacements on Apple's more recent devices by $20 across the board.That means that it now costs $149 to replace a screen on the smaller 6S and 7 instead of the original $129, and $169 for the 6S Plus and 7 Plus, up from the old price of $149.The new $149 and $169 prices also apply to the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus, which will be released later this week.These prices only apply if you've got an iPhone that isn't covered by Apple's extended AppleCare+ warranty, though — if you pay for AppleCare+ and are within your two year window, then the first two screen replacements on your device will only cost $29 each, no matter which device you have.Unfortunately, Apple has also increased the cost of AppleCare+, at least for its larger phones, increasing the price from $129 for the 6S Plus, 7 Plus, and 8 Plus to $149.(AppleCare+ for the iPhone 6S, 7, and 8 still costs the same $129.)
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