Harvey Broughton

Harvey Broughton

Followers 15
Following 15
US
If the public are serious about wanting to protect children from online sexual abuse more investment in skilled professionals is needed now.The stark warning comes from researchers following publication of a new report commissioned by the Independent Inquiry on Child Sexual Abuse (IICSA) which coincided with the first day of the public hearing into online child sexual abuse.Victims of online facilitated child sexual abuse often remain undetected until images or videos of their abuse are picked up by criminal investigations.And warns Professor Corinne May-Chahal, of Lancaster University, who led this piece of research: "These involve a growing number of children but the resources needed to detect abuse, trace victims and help them get support is very limited."She added that a key question asked by parents and those working with children is what made a child at risk of online sexual abuse.The Lancaster report, examines what is known about the characteristics, vulnerabilities and on-and-offline behaviour of victims of online-facilitated child sexual abuse and exploitation.
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China
New reports emerging out of China are suggesting that Xiaomi might reveal the in-house Surge S2 chip at MWC 2018.The Surge S2 would be the heir to the Surge S1 that was launched in 2017 hosted by the Xiaomi Mi 5C.The clock has now come full circle and it is probably the right time for a successor.Xiaomi Surge S2 rumoured SpecsTalk around Chinese circles is that the Surge S2 will be a cut above the Surge S1 dishing out a top-notch performance.It is believed to be an octa-core SoC based on TSMC’s 16nm manufacturing process.
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UK
Intel is warning customers, computer makers and cloud providers to avoid installing its Spectre and Meltdown patches — designed to address two high-profile security flaws in its chips — after it found the patches were not behaving as expected.The company has advised users to stop updating their systems until they deploy a better fix.The company said it has identified the root cause of the "reboot issue" affecting its Haswell and Broadwell processors that first popped up earlier this month, and is working towards deploying a solution that patches the exploits without causing any other unexpected issues.It did not name other processor families such as Ivy Bridge, Skylake, Kaby Lake and Coffee Lake in this guidance.I assure you we are working around the clock to ensure we are addressing these issues," Shenoy said.In recent weeks, technology giants have scrambled to address and issue fixes for the critical Meltdown and Spectre design flaws after researchers found the critical flaws exist in Intel, ARM and AMD chips built in the past two decades.
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US
5G networks may be closer than we think.Nokia has announced that it has entered a partnership with Japanese telecom company NTT DoCoMo to supply 5G the telecom company with wireless radio stations.The contract is the first of its kind for Nokia’s new 5G equipment, which is based on New Radio standards.The specifications for NR were only finalized in December of last year.The current terms of the deal suggest that DoCoMo will have 5G service available in Tokyo in time for the 2020 Olympics.Once 5G has been established in the greater Tokyo region, the telecom company plans to roll it out to the rest of the country.
US
Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed a novel electric propulsion technology for nanorobots.It allows molecular machines to move a hundred thousand times faster than with the biochemical processes used to date.The new research results appeared today as the cover story in the renowned scientific journal Science.They are produced by glowing molecules affixed to the ends of tiny robot arms.His team has for the first time managed to control nanobots electrically and has at the same time set a record: The new technique is 100 000 times faster than all previous methods.The required miniature machines can already be produced cost-effectively using the DNA-origami technique.
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UK
These past few days have seen a ferociously wild volatility in the markets, in correlation with FUD spread through speculation regarding China / South Korea regulatory action (and the potential for other countries to adopt similar policies) as well as sensationalist stories and misinformation spread by voices of the mainstream media.One possible reason for why people are making this claim argument for this is the expectation of an inevitable price resurgence.This can be found through study and analysis of examples whose market changes have often gone against the grain of general market trends.NEO (and it’s co-currency GAS) saw a meteoric jump in market price: from $127 to $147 per unit overall since the 10th of January, peaking at $196.85 just yesterday whilst all other markets were dwindling.This is provided you were privileged enough to risk an odd $138,889 back then.These gains would not have been achievable without the backing of long-term stakeholders such as enthusiast token holders, professional partners, and a well-managed community.
US
The classic problem of how teachers should devote resources to their students, such as helping students that are struggling in specific areas, is one that’s still ever-present — but it needs a deceptively-simple approach to making that more manageable, even if it’s just a colored progress bar if Clever CEO Tyler Bosmeny gets his way.It’s a tool that, in a way, boils down to a colored progress bar that helps give teachers and students a set of near-term goals that they might want to achieve by the end of the week, and gives teachers a way to identify where to invest their time in order to help achieve those goals.Clever researched usage from its apps across teachers, students, and even the wants of parents, and ended up with a kind of easy-to-use progress report in order to keep a constant tab on how students are doing.“We’re focusing on marking it smarter for teachers in the classroom,” Bosmeny said.Those bars correspond to whatever goals a teacher has set — maybe doing a half hour of practice in a literacy app or reading, or something along those lines.The aim is to set near-term reachable goals and give them a set of cues that show them how close they are to completing those near-term goals.
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US
Computers can play a pretty mean round of chess and keep up with the best of their human counterparts in other zero-sum games.But teaching them to cooperate and compromise instead of compete?With help from a new algorithm created by BYU computer science professors Jacob Crandall and Michael Goodrich, along with colleagues at MIT and other international universities, machine compromise and cooperation appears not just possible, but at times even more effective than among humans."The end goal is that we understand the mathematics behind cooperation with people and what attributes artificial intelligence needs to develop social skills," said Crandall, whose study was recently published in Nature Communications.For the study, researchers programmed machines with an algorithm called S and ran them through a variety of two-player games to see how well they would cooperate in certain relationships."As it is, about half of the humans lied at some point.
US
It seems like publications and business owners everywhere are talking about the rise of chatbots.Whether driven by humans or bots, many of our interactions with contact centers today and in the future will shift from phone calls to online rich-text chat sessions.In the business context, it is also known as A2P SMS, or “application to person SMS,” where a contact center sends an SMS message to a customer notifying them of a sale or the status of their recent call.SMS can be expensive and limited.While it provides a feeling of continuity in an ongoing conversation, there’s less ability for branding.It also offers the means for customers to communicate with these businesses directly via iMessage.
UK
AT is being pressured to cut commercial ties with Chinese company Huawei, according to sources who say US lawmakers are behind the issue.The reason reportedly revolves around national security concerns, with officials fearing that Huawei could be a company compromised by the Chinese government.The news follows a recent bill proposal that seeks to ban US government agencies from contracting with firms that use Huawei hardware.Unnamed US lawmakers are also pressuring AT to oppose China Mobile, a telecommunications company, from expanding into the US, according to Reuters.The information is said to come from a pair of congressional aides, one of which claims that these lawmakers are telling US companies that working with either company — China Mobile or Huawei — could negatively impact their options for working with the feds.National security concerns are reportedly cited as the chief reason for opposing the presence of Chinese communications and hardware companies in the US.
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UK
Google makes investments in cloud infrastructure to boost GCP and other appsGoogle is investing $30 billion in three new subsea cables and five new regions as it looks to boost the spread and reliability of its cloud services.The new regions, located in the Netherlands, Montreal, Los Angeles, Finland and Hong Kong, will go live from 2018 and will bring the total number to 18.The Havfrue cable will link the US with Denmark and Ireland, while the Hong Kong Guam cable system (HK-G) will provide better connections between hubs in Asia and open new routes to Australia.Both are consortium cables, whereas Curie is Google’s private cable linking Los Angeles and Chile.It is the first subsea cable to land in Chile for two decades and will help provide services for Google’s customers in Latin America.
US
An African American writer calls out racist hate speech—and gets suspended from Facebook.A Google engineer writes a controversial memo, and instantly becomes a villain to one army of online readers and a hero to another.These are just a few stories—told in the subjects' own words—that capture what it’s like to live and post in this, our corrosive, divisive, democracy-poisoning golden age of free speech.On being blocked by Trump, and suing him for itI had an alert that would go off whenever Trump tweeted, and I would reply to most of his tweets.Nine months before my fifth novel, American Heart, was published, I got an email saying “There’s a discussion happening on Twitter about the problematic white-savior narrative in your novel.” I thought that was strange.
China
Xiaomi’s Mi Max 3 specs and speculated pricing has leaked.The leak was posted on Weibo.Judging from the specs, the Mi Max 3 will follow in its predecessor’s footsteps.Dimensionally speaking, the Max 3 will sport almost the same dimensions as the Max 2 with the only difference being the speculated 7-inch full screen display, allowing for an aspect ratio of 18:9.This means that there will be no capacitive navigation, instead only screen navigation will be present.The full screen display does not come as.
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US
Surprises are rare at auto shows, but Hyundai pulled one over on the industry when it unveiled the 2019 Veloster N at the 2018 Detroit Auto Show.In addition to unveiling the standard trims of its all-new 2019 Veloster, Hyundai also gave us the N, which will be the first US-market car to fall under Hyundai's new performance brand.Overseas, it has the i30 N, which we don't get in the US.This will be the first of what I hope will be several new performance-oriented Hyundais to land on our shores.Under the hood is a 2.0-liter, direct-injected, turbocharged I4.It puts out up to 275 horsepower and 260 pound-feet of torque, all of which is routed to the front wheels through a six-speed manual transmission.
US
On a sweltering Thursday, he hops out of a yellow cab, crosses Fifth Avenue, and scurries up a dirt path.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that the organism responsible for her death could evade 26 antibiotic drugs.The culprit, pan-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae, is not the only superbug overpowering humanity’s defenses; it is part of a family known as carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae.One problem with antibiotic resistance is that, for most people, it remains abstract—right now its lethal impact is relatively small.So it’s difficult to envision a future that resembles the pre-antibiotic past—an era of untreatable staph, strep, tuberculosis, leprosy, pneumonia, cholera, diphtheria, scarlet and puerperal fevers, dysentery, typhoid, meningitis, gas gangrene, and gonorrhea.The risks of organ transplants and medical implants would outweigh any potential benefit.
UK
Sure, it's free and easy to use, but independent tests show its protection rates can be considerably lower than the leading competition.There are free antivirus solutions that can be used with other tools to keep you protected, but they don't always provide a complete suite of antivirus software tools that the best paid-for antivirus software provides.Then why not check out our listing of best business antivirus packagesIn a world packed with free security software, Bitdefender Antivirus Plus 2018's annual $39.99 fee may look expensive.An excellent anti-phishing module alerts you to malicious links in your search engine results, and blocks access to dangerous sites.There are one or two issues – it grabs more resources than average, and might conflict with some programs – but Bitdefender Antivirus Plus 2018 is still a likeable package which offers excellent detection rates, great performance, and more than enough bonus features to justify the price.
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US
Facebook has been under fire for chasing dollars rather than ‘likes’, Marc Pritchard is sainted for trashing the “content crap trap” and every day another news story breaks on the ease of inadvertently attaching a brand’s content to racist, sexist or violent images—all in the (often automated) name of reaching ‘ever more accurate’ eyeballs for ‘ever decreasing’ CPMs.The story goes that planning and buying media has never been more automated or more accurate—so why aren’t we in a utopian world of marketing ROAS being so incredible we’re all buying new Hamptons homes and spending the winter in St. Barts?Well, over the past 10 years at Havas we’ve been tracking how ‘meaningful’ a brand is to consumers.Sadly, as we’ve published our findings every 18 months or so, we know from some 300,000 consumers surveyed that brands are losing their meaning, not gaining it.At this point, in the U.S., 74 percent of brands could disappear tomorrow and no one would care—practically everything can be substituted, switched or forgotten.The explosion of digital opportunity has done several things to media clients and agencies but here’s two that seem pretty important to me: Firstly, a move to digital-first planning and audience buying has inherently impacted the planning process for clients.
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UK
The US Embassy in London - which Donald Trump claimed was the reason he cancelled his upcoming trip to the UK - owes almost £12 million in unpaid congestion charges, figures reveal.Between 2003 and December 31, 2017, American diplomats clocked up £11,925,560 in fines, according to Transport for London (TfL) data - the highest figure for any country with an embassy in the capital.The US argues the congestion charge is a tax and that diplomats are therefore exempt from paying.The embassy hit the headlines today after the President tweeted he had scrapped his February trip to the UK because he “is not a big fan” its new location.“Reason I canceled my trip to London is that I am not a big fan of the Obama Administration having sold perhaps the best located and finest embassy in London for “peanuts,” only to build a new one in an off location for 1.2 billion dollars,” Trump wrote this morning.Wanted me to cut ribbon-NO!”
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US
Burger King certainly isn't above using stunts and a touch of controversy to sell its burgers, as it showed with its pyro showdown with McDonald's and its hijacking of the movie IT.In its latest French ad, by agency Buzzman, Burger King again pushes the limits by making its Whopper Meal a prisoner's last meal, with a twist.In the spot, 'The Last Meal', a prison guard is seen wheeling a cart through a prison, past an electric chair being prepared for use.It stops at a doomed death row prisoner's cell, a tough looking guy with a dagger tattoo below his eye.The meal is uncovered to show a Whopper with fries.Another guard eyes the meal with longing and temptation.
US
As Uber has expanded -- opening offices in 78 countries worldwide -- sometimes local authorities have raided its offices.Police have wanted emails, documents and information on drivers and employees.It's happened in Paris, Hong Kong, Montreal and other countries.One type of software the company devised and reportedly used from Spring 2015 to late 2016 was called Ripley, according to a report by Bloomberg.Ripley -- which was said to be named after Sigourney Weaver's character in the 1979 sci-fi movie "Alien" -- could remotely disable, lock or change the password on employees' computers and smartphones.Uber's on-site managers followed protocol and alerted company headquarters about what was happening.
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