James Woodson

James Woodson

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Following 19
UK
Android is the most widely-used operating system in the world, and that means having the best security apps and antivirus tools for Android installed on your device is essential, as Google's OS is often targeted by malware due to its popularity.AVL is a former winner of the AV-Test (a well-respected independent antivirus testing outfit) award for best protection of mobile devices.Its features include not only an antivirus database (of course) but a scanner capable of detecting any kind of executable file making its way onto your device.You can pay a small monthly or yearly premium to remove these.Minimal impact on your OSYou must schedule virus scans
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Rural businesses stuck with slow connections are being offered a lifeline.British company, buzzbox Telecom, has developed a 4G business-grade dongle that offers connectivity for up to 10 devices.The system offers a choice of O2 or Vodafone to connect users through the company’s wi-fi network.The cost of the service is £20 per month with no long-term contract and a one-off set up fee of £29.Access to fast broadband remains a problem for many rural companies.According to Ofcom’s State of Nations report, last December, about 17% of rural premises are not receiving a viable broadband connection, This compares to just 2% in urban areas.
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Smaller, iterative Android Wear 2.0 updates seem to be commonplace now and the latest upgrade wants to make it easier to read your notifications.Google is pushing an update through the Android Wear app on your phone - this isn't a large OTA update straight to your watch - that makes it easier to read notifications.A blog post from Google claims the update will include "improved notification glanceability with a new layout which shows more of your messages at a glance."This should mean your watch will have less blank space when a notification appears on your wrist.The update also makes the background darker, which Google claims will improve readability.We have yet to test the new update, but if Google is right in its description it should show more of each notification directly on your wrist and make it far easier for you to read without getting your phone out of your pocket.
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A strange animal mystery captivated the internet back in 2015: 200,000 critically endangered saiga antelopes in Kazakhstan died from internal bleeding after infections.Surreal photographs showed hundreds of dead antelopes that appeared to have simply dropped dead where they stood as a herd.Following the die off, folks quickly guessed that infections from normally harmless Pasteurella multocida caused the die-off.Deeper analysis has found another connection: the infection was strongly linked to warmer weather and higher humidity.That’s bad news, considering the whole climate change thing.“The fact that P. multocida infection in saigas... appears strongly linked to high humidity and temperature is of concern going forward, given that a climate change–induced increase in temperature is projected for the region over the short to medium term,” the international team of authors write in the study published in Science Advances.
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Atlassian cofounders Mike Cannon-Brookes, left, and Scott FarquharAtlassianAustralian software giant Atlassian took a $47 million hit to its bottom line thanks to changes in tax rates brought under the new tax law.The charge and stock drop marred an otherwise strong quarterly report.The new tax law was designed to help corporations.But Atlassian's bottom line and stock price took hits on Thursday because of it.The Australian software giant, which makes Jira and HipChat, announced a $65 million loss for its most recent quarter thanks in part to a one-time charge related to the tax rate changes in the new law.
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Google has developed its new operating system, codenamed Fuchsia, for well over a year.Up until now, it’s been difficult to actually run the experimental project to get a sneak peek, but the recent addition of Pixelbook support has offered up a new way to take it for a test drive.Beyond a lock screen and login form that will look relatively familiar to anyone who has used Google’s services, there are actually quite a few working components in the current version of Fuchsia, according to Ars Technica.The Google bar at the bottom of the user interface is said to work in a limited capacity, although it’s rife with placeholders for the time being.It can search through local files and will offer a web launcher if you type in a URL.The web browser is unfinished and won’t render many sites, although it’s, of course, able to display the Google homepage with no issues.
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“We love subzero weather, and pray for it,” says Eric Hegedus, an engine test engineer with GE Aviation.They’re here to bring the freeze to the world’s largest jet engine, the GE9X.Developed primarily for the new Boeing 777X, this behemoth is wider than the fuselage of a 737 jet and can generate more than 10,000 pounds of thrust.Hegedus, who usually works at GE Aviation’s Cincinnati headquarters, is in Winnipeg to see how well the engine handles when things get icy.Just to mount the ginormous thing, which just completed other tests (like being shot with frozen chickens and consuming buckets of foreign sand) at GE’s Peebles, Ohio, facility, the team had to expand and rejigger its test stand, rigging up extra fans and nozzles, to simulate the amount of air and water the engine will guzzle at speed.Once they’ve installed and wired up the engine with a bevy of sensors, the engineers will sit and wait for the right temperature to arrive—somewhere between -6 and -10 degrees Fahrenheit.
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Amazon has launched a new section called “$10 and Under” that, as the name suggests, presents customers with items that cost no more than $10 each.The category is full of trinkets, clothing, jewelry, and other inexpensive items.Notable is the section’s free shipping, keeping the cost very low for those times you have money to burn.The section appears to be a direct response to the website Wish.Wish.com is a platform that offers random items at low prices, some of it falling solidly into the “junk” category, others being interesting enough odds and ends.Amazon’s $10 and Under section has the same feel, though a quick glance shows the absence of some of the more questionable products you may see on Wish (such as weight loss magnetic ear stickers).
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The battle is well and truly on to replace Lockheed Martin’s legendary SR-71-“Blackbird” hypersonic plane after Boeing this week unveiled a concept design that takes high-speed flight technology to the next level.Dubbed the “son of Blackbird,” Boeing’s design is a direct competitor to Lockheed’s under-development SR-72 and would travel at five times the speed of sound (Mach 5) — or 3,836 mph (6,174 kmh).To put that in perspective, your run-of-the-mill Boeing 787 Dreamliner passenger jet has a cruising speed of around 560 mph (903 kmh), while the McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle fighter plane can push the dial to around 1,650 mph (2,665 kmh).So yes, a ride in Boeing’s design would have your eyeballs pressing against the back of your skull and your stomach searching for an orifice through which to escape.Boeing’s concept (above), revealed at the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics SciTech forum in Orlando, Florida, reveals a sleek design that could one day be used for both reconnaissance and combat missions.Clearly mindful of the huge challenges that come with designing such an aircraft, Boeing chief scientist for hypersonics Kevin Bowcutt told Aviation Week recently: “It’s a really hard problem to develop an aircraft that takes off and accelerates through Mach 1 all the way to Mach 5 and beyond.”
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Researchers collected advertised prices for entry-level broadband plans—those meeting the federal standard of at least 25Mbps download and 3Mbps upload speeds—offered by 40 community-owned ISPs and compared them to advertised prices from private competitors.This fight includes pushing legislators to draft anti-municipal broadband state laws, lobbying against local ballot initiatives, and filing lawsuits against cities that build their own networks.Average prices over four yearsThe Berkman Klein Center report says:We found that most community-owned FTTH [fiber-to-the-home] networks charged less and offered prices that were clear and unchanging, whereas private ISPs typically charged initial low promotional or "teaser" rates that later sharply rose, usually after 12 months.The municipal provider's prices were better, even though its entry-level broadband speeds were 60Mbps down and 60Mbps up, while the entry-level KTC Pace and Cox plans offered 50Mbps down and just 5Mbps up.
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HTC has unveiled its new U11 Eyes phone, featuring dual front cameras that the company says are designed for taking selfies.The two front-facing 5-megapixel cameras feature HDR boost, a bokeh mode which adjusts the depth-of-field in photographs (in real-time or after the photo is taken), and a beauty mode that HTC promises will create “spectacular selfies.”The U11 also has a Snapdragon 652 processor, a 6-inch screen, 12MP rear camera, face unlock, and edge sense (a HTC gimmick that allows you to launch apps, zoom into maps, or perform other functions by squeezing the sides of the phone).It’s also water and dust resistant and has a massive 3,930mAh battery.It’s a mid-range device, but features the same liquid-shiny design as earlier U11 handsets.Engadget says HTC claims the U11 Eyes’ camera can distinguish between a real human face and those shown on a photo or video.
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The Meltdown vulnerability, which by contrast is already comprehensively defended against, could become the focus of malware attacking the operations of processors on unpatched systems, experts warn.Meltdown – like Spectre – is an information disclosure flaw that isn't by itself suited to remote code execution, so the concern is that it might be combined as part of other attacks and used to lift secrets such as passwords and cryptographic credentials from unpatched systems.Daniel Genkin, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Maryland, previously told El Reg that a lasting fix against Spectre would require a hardware redesign."The next step is getting customers to adopt patches."Werner Haas, CTO at Cyberus Technology and a member of one of the three teams that independently discovered and reported Meltdown, told El Reg that achieving comprehensive protection against Spectre is far from straightforward and likely to involve an "ongoing process" involving a combination of software fixes and hardware modifications."On the other hand, branch prediction or speculation is such an integral part of high-performance CPUs that I lack the fantasy for a straightforward micro-architectural fix.
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Netflix has delivered another six glimpses into Black Mirror‘s often-bleak view of technology and humanity.On the latest episode of TechCrunch’s Original Content podcast, one of your regular hosts, Anthony Ha, is joined by Jordan Crook to discuss the fourth season of the science fiction anthology series.While we liked it — in fact, we both thought it might be Black Mirror‘s strongest season overall — we also discussed some of our reservations.As Jordan put it: “It’s really, really hard to love something that makes you feel like shit.”We had plenty to say about each episode, particularly in a debate over the merits of “U.S.S.Callister,” an episode that serves as both a pastiche of classic Star Trek and a condemnation of nerd misogyny.
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Two of the main showstoppers to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) making a major impact in electronics has been putting them where you want them to go and separating the semiconducting variety from the metallic ones.It’s not clear that the solutions to these issues have opened the door to CNTs being the go-to solution in a post-silicon electronics world.But at least there are some solutions being proposed if not developed.That has not been the case for another problem with carbon nanotubes: the difficulty in getting uniform electrical resistance measurements.Now research teams at Rice University and Swansea University in the UK, both under the supervision of Andrew Barron who teaches at both universites, have shown that cleanliness is the key to getting more accurate resistance measurements for CNTs.In the process, the researchers may have discovered just how far future electronics can go into the nanoscale when using carbon nanotubes.
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For the third time in recent months, big problems have been discovered with macOS High Sierra.In September, a security researcher named Patrick Wardle discovered an exploit to snag plaintext passwords from Keychain.Two months later, software developer Lemi Orhan Ergin realised that gaining root access to High Sierra machines was essentially as easy as inputting the username “root,” no password required.And now, Macrumors reports, a gaping hole has been found that could affect a Mac user’s security.A bug report on Open Radar from earlier this week—affecting version 10.13.2—allows any user to change the App Store system preferences without a real password, in five steps or fewer:1) Log in as a local admin
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Amid all the hardware introduced during the show, Dell launched a new service called Dell Mobile Connect for Android and iOS devices at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.The goal is to seamlessly integrate the PC with a wireless device, but the catch — of course — is that the parent PC must be manufactured by Dell.The service is pre-installed on all new Dell PCs (Alienware included) now sold on the mainstream “consumer” market.This service requires two components: the Dell/Alienware Mobile Connect Windows 10 app installed on the parent PC, and the Dell/Alienware Mobile Connect app installed on an Android or iOS smartphone or tablet.The connection requires Bluetooth or Wi-Fi Direct, and once you install the mobile app and pair your phone, the app will generate a special code that must be entered into the Windows 10 app.“Your connection is only accessible on the PC when you are present and the communication remains secure through a point-to-point connection, never going through the internet or Wi-Fi routers,” Dell said, pointing out why the service doesn’t rely on your local network.
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In conjunction with CES 2018, the industry group behind the Wi-Fi certification label said it plans to introduce a stronger security suite this yearThe Wi-Fi Alliance, backed by industry giants including Apple, Cisco, Intel and Microsoft, said this year will see the introduction of a new version of the WPA set of security technologies used in all Wi-Fi certified devices.The launch of WPA3, announced in Las Vegas in conjunction with the CES consumer electronics show, follows last year’s disclosure of an attack called KRACK that affected devices using the protocol’s previous version, WPA2.But the Wi-Fi certification body said it expects devices to continue using WPA2 “for the forseeable future”, even as the more secure standard begins to appear in new hardware.While it didn’t disclose technical details, the group said WPA3 will include protections for networks with weak passwords and a feature making it easier for devices without screens, like locks or light bulbs, to be configured by gadgets such as smartphones or tablets.The standard is also to include individualised encryption for protecting privacy in open networks and a 192-bit security suite aligned with the Committee on National Security Systems’ Commercial National Security Algorithm (CNSA).
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Talking with CBR’s Ellie Burns, the VP of Research at Cloudera talks about the need to think for yourself, as well as the need for businesses to prioritise diversity in all its dimensions.I have always loved reading non-fiction science and science fiction and fantasy, and imagining the future that we could be living in.As an adult, I still love to read, and now I choose to do work that aims to create the future that we’ll all want to live in.I’ve followed the most interesting thing at each step and been lucky enough to have opportunities to continue to pursue work that I’m excited about.It took a few painful years to learn that the opposite is true – if you want to succeed in doing anything impactful in computer science, you need to learn to communicate, collaborate with, and inspire, other people.I love the depth of our research work and the breadth of our customer work, and seeing both of these efforts lead to significant impact.
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As an adult, my mum is rarely around to remind me to reapply sunscreen when I’m outside.But do you know who still nags me all day long?So L’Oréal has created an incredibly tiny UV sensor you wear on your thumbnail that connects to your smartphone to help you keep track of your exposure to the sun’s rays.Powered by a capacitor that charges from a wireless NFC connection to your phone, the UV Sense doesn’t need a bulky battery you have to charge every night.As a result, its various components, including an ultraviolet sensor and status LED, can all squeeze into a tiny housing that’s just nine millimetres wide, and two millimetres thick.When worn on your thumb, which guarantees it gets as much exposure to the sun as possible, you’ll barely notice it’s there.
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On a cold Sunday early last month in the small Austrian city of Graz, three young researchers sat down in front of the computers in their homes, and tried to break their most fundamental security protections.After a Saturday night drinking with friends, they got to work the next day, each independently writing code to test a theoretical attack on the suspected vulnerability, sharing their progress via instant message.From his computer across the city, Lipp soon tested proof-of-concept code he'd written himself and could see the same results: URLs and file names materializing out of the digital noise.They'd found a gap in one of the most basic security defenses computers offer: that they isolate untrusted programs from accessing other processes on the computer or the deepest layers of the computer's operating system where its most sensitive secrets are kept.On cloud computing services like Amazon Web Services, where multiple virtual machines coexist in the same physical server, one malicious virtual machine could peer deeply into the secrets of its neighbors.The synchronicity of those processor attack findings, argues security researcher and Harvard Belfer Center fellow Bruce Schneier, represents not just an isolated mystery but a policy lesson: When intelligence agencies like the NSA discover hackable vulnerabilities and exploit them in secret, they can't assume those bugs won't be rediscovered by other hackers in what the security industry calls a "bug collision."
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