Jose Ghosh

Jose Ghosh

Followers 80
Following 19
US
The world’s dominant gadget company will start selling the HomePod in a few weeks but it’s very late to the game.The HomePod is Apple’s take on the smart connected speaker market that has been the domain of Amazon and Google for some time.Apple aims to be best rather than first so the late arrival is no great surprise but, unlike the iPhone, it’s not clear what Apple special sauce can be applied to the HomePod to differentiate it from the incumbents.Aside from the presence of the Apple logo and a presumably intimate relationship with Siri, Apple seems to think the big USP for its effort will be ‘advanced audio technologies’.“HomePod is a magical new music experience from Apple,” said Apple Marketing SVP with characteristic understatement.“It brings advanced audio technologies like beam-forming tweeters, a high-excursion woofer and automatic spatial awareness, together with the entire Apple Music catalogue and the latest Siri intelligence, in a simple, beautiful design that is so much fun to use.”
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China
Xiaomi has just announced the next major version of its Android-based MIUI custom OS.The announcement was made earlier today by co-founder and senior vice-president of Xiaomi Hong Feng, who coincidentally is the head of the company’s MIUI business unit at the 2017 summary meeting.The latest version of Xiaomi’s custom Android OS and successor to the MIUI 9 is dubbed MIUI 10, and not MIUI X as it was previously rumored.The company hasn’t revealed any details of the MIUI 10 but said the main development team will immediately swing into action.There are speculations that the biggest update to the Xiaomi MIUI 10 will be centered on artificial intelligence, as earlier hinted by representative Huong Zhong back in 2017.It was only a couple of days ago the company put an end to the MIUI 9 development when it released a couple of devices which can be upgraded to the latest MIUI 9.
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When you find a good cable for a cheap price, it never hurts to grab it.Anker's USB-C to USB cables feature a double-braided nylon exterior, toughened aramid fiber core and laser-welded connectors, which Anker says makes them more reliable and longer lasting.With this deal, you'll get two 6-foot cables for $9.49, which is a healthy discount from its average list price.See Anker's discounted cables now on Amazon, where they currently average 4.5 out of 5 stars from over 300 customers.This story, "Get 2 USB-C to USB 6-foot Cables For $9.49 Right Now On Amazon" was originally published by PCWorld.
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UK
Fox currently has a 39% stake in Sky, and has been trying to buy the remaining 61%.However, the Competition and Markets Authority in the UK (the CMA) has said such a deal would not be in the public interest thanks to media plurality.The Murdoch Family Trust which currently controls Fox, also has control of several other major news outlets in the UK — The Sun, The Times and Fox News to name but a few — and should it come to own the entirety of Sky, it would have too much control over news broadcasting (and therefore too much control over political agenda and public opinion).Other than the issue of media plurality, however, the investigation carried out by the CMA found that Fox's commitment to broadcasting standards in the UK are more than adequate and in that regard, its control of Sky wouldn't be against the public interest.Of course, Fox recently agreed to a deal with Disney, in which Disney is to buy most of Fox's business — so if the Sky/Fox deal was to go through, it's likely that Sky would become a property of Disney.In light of that, the CMA will continue to investigate and will set out its final report on 1st May.
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UK
There seems to be a new pattern among some of the newer and smaller players in the smartphone market.Launch a phone with “decent”, sometimes even dismal camera performance and then promise a firmware update that fixes it later.That fix does come, eventually, but sometimes the results are less than satisfying.Fortunately there are some rather devoted app developers, like XDA Senior Member txx1219, who develop some mods, like this OnePlus Camera M, that takes the disappointing stock OEM camera app and magically transforms it into something good.OnePlus’s performance in the smartphone photography category has been hit or miss, depending on who you ask.The company always teases and hypes its next gen phone’s camera but sometimes falls short of meeting user expectations.
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US
I mean, from the sound of things, this newly discovered malware can give the bad guys free rein on your Android smartphone.Let’s start with the facts.Or, for that matter, it can gather information from you that’s not on your smartphone yet.And when you unlock your phone, it will also snap your photo.Oh, and by the way, don’t think that being in standby mode will help you any.Skygofree will keep working even if you’re using Android 8.x Oreo, which ordinarily automatically stops inactive processes to save battery power.
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UK
Fitness trackers are pretty remarkable devices when you know how to use them.In an ideal world, your fitness tracker would be like a digital personal trainer that sits on your wrist and coaches you through a training regime, powered by the rich data that it's observing.We sat down with Tom Fowler, President of Polar (and former professional triathlete) to talk about the state fitness trackers are in now, and where they are going.One of the main takeaways is that Polar has realized that fitness trackers need to go beyond the basic ‘this is what you’re doing’ tracking that many devices do:“There are lots of companies that can track GPS based metrics or heart rate based metrics and show you a billion different permutations of those numbers in terms of maxes, averages, your current blah blah blah," Tom said.“But here's the thing; just because you're wearing a watch and you can see that ‘Oh I'm running 7 minutes and 45 seconds a mile, and my heartbeat is 130 and I've been doing that an hour’ like ok, that's kind of neato data.
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UK
NASA has started sniffing jet fuel as part of joint experiment with the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft-und Raumfahrt, DLR).The experiment sees DLR fly an Airbus A320 burning newfangled jet fuels.NASA follows along its Armstrong flying lab, a Douglas DC-8.Aviation enthusiasts among The Register’s readership will recall that the DC-8 as an unlovely four-engine jet of the 1960s.NASA’s was built in 1969 and the agency keeps it flying because it can still carry a pretty decent payload.For this experiment its carrying sensors that let it sniff the exhaust of DLR’s A320, as that bird’s burning experimental fuels made with the seeds of Camelina plants.
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US
Tokyo-based Bitcoin exchange BitFlyer has kicked off operations in Europe, after having secured the necessary Payment Institution license to run its service across the EU.The exchange launched in the US last November, and claims that more than $250 billion in virtual currency was traded on its platform in 2017.According to Financial Times, it facilitates about 20-30 percent of all Bitcoin trades globally.With that, BitFlyer claims that it’s now the only licensed exchange to allow cross-border Bitcoin trading between Europe and Japan, among the largest markets for the virtual currency in the world.To start, it’ll only allow trading of Bitcoin/Euro pairs and will initially target professional high-volume traders; plans to support other currencies like Ethereum and Litecoin, as well as more fiat currencies, are in the works for the coming months.The news follows speculation over whether South Korea will close domestic cryptocurrency exchanges; at present, the government is having those businesses’ offices raided to investigate alleged tax evasion and is considering shutting down those are aren’t compliant with local laws.
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UK
Netflix has changed the way we engage with television shows and movies forever, giving us the most convenient way to experience both from the comfort of our living rooms, laptop screens or smartphones.With a rapidly growing library of shows on the service and a huge lineup of projects in the works, we've put together a list of the best upcoming TV shows and movies on Netflix for 2018 and beyond.The shows and films on this list have been hand-picked based on how excited we are for them, meaning that it's not intended to be a complete release schedule.Instead, consider it our curated list of the coolest looking Netflix Originals currently in the works.We've also included upcoming seasons of already established shows which we're really eager to see.So without further ado, these are the best upcoming TV shows and movies on Netflix.
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US
Life insurance company TAL is promoting its partnership with Australia’s Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) with a new campaign.The campaign aims to launch the partnership, which will see TAL support the RFDS, one of the largest and most comprehensive aeromedical organisations in the world and the most trusted charity brand in Australia.The ad brings to life the experience of the service, which provides health care and 24-hour emergency service to people in Australia’s rural regions and covers an area of 7.69 million square kilometres.The ad shows a remote community coming together to create a runway to help an RFDS plane land in a field.The campaign, which is running on TV and social media during the Australian Open, was created by BMF with production company Exit Films.BMF creative director Jen Speirs said, “As you can imagine, in the remote areas that the RFDS operates, luxuries like well-lit, rock-free runways without kangaroos grazing along them, just don’t exist.
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UK
Governor Steve Bullock signed off Monday on an executive order declaring that, as of July 1, all ISPs that want to do businesses with state agencies must adhere to basic net neutrality tenets including bans on paid prioritization and throttling of lawful traffic.Telcos that don't comply can still operate in Montana, but will be ineligible to receive any service contracts with government agencies."When the FCC repealed its net neutrality rules, it said consumers should choose.The State of Montana is one of the biggest consumers of internet services in our state," Bullock said in announcing the deal."Today we’re making our choice clear: we want net neutrality.It's good government, and our citizens who use online services rely on it."
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UK
If you were even semi-conscious during the last two years, you’ll know that social media can wreak havoc on a functioning democracy.In introducing the series, Facebook’s global politics and government outreach director Katie Harbath admits flatly that there was “foreign interference that Facebook should have been quicker to identify to the rise of ‘fake news’ and echo chambers” in the 2016 election.This sentiment slightly contradicts what Zuckerberg as been saying for a year.Responding to Donald Trump claiming that Facebook was “anti-Trump,” Zuckerberg admitted last September that he shouldn’t have been so dismissive of these fake news claims.Still, the Facebook founder maintained that Facebook’s role in the election was more positive than negative.This aw-shucks blog series, apparently pegged to the first anniversary of Donald Trump’s election in the US, is only slightly more sceptical.
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US
Hydropower dams may conjure images of the massive Grand Coulee Dam in Washington state or the Three Gorges Dam in Hubei, China -- the world's largest electricity-generating facility.But not all dams are the stuff of documentaries.These structures are small enough to avoid the many regulations large dams face, and are built more quickly and in much higher densities.As streams, rivers and watersheds absorb more small dams, however, surprisingly few scientific studies have considered their environmental impact, and policies or regulations are lacking or largely inconsistent.University of Washington researchers have published the first major assessment of small hydropower dams around the world -- including their potential for growth -- and highlight the incredibly variability in how dams of varying sizes are categorized, regulated and studied.Their paper, the first to provide a global synthesis of the science and policy of small hydropower, appears this month in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.
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UK
Mr Zuckerberg, are we the baddies?Facebook has admitted it was "far too slow" to recognize that its systems were being used to "spread misinformation and corrode democracy."In a blog post today by its manager of civic engagement Samidh Chakrabarti, the social media giant appears to have become self-aware following a year in which countless researchers, journalists and lawmakers have tried to get it to wake from its reverie and recognize how the company's vast publishing platform is being constantly misused – and that it was in part responsible.Clickbait fake news, disinformation from Russia to divide America that reached more than 120 million people, and similar crap, have plagued Facebook for years.Following a post earlier this month from Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg in which he acknowledged that the Silicon Valley titan needed to spend more time "protecting our community from abuse and hate, defending against interference by nation states, or making sure that time spent on Facebook is time well spent," Facebook underlings have seemingly been granted permission to question their own mythical view of themselves.The post revealed that the company is at least finally being honest about the scale of the problem.
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The search giant’s Arts & Culture app, which pairs a selfie you take with one of the thousands of artworks available on Google’s database, has already seen more than 30 million downloads, according to the company.While most of the internet is enjoying taking selfies and seeing what artwork they’re matched with, other users raised concerns over the app’s alleged facial recognition technology and what exactly Google’s doing with that data.According to a disclaimer on the app and in a blog post, Google doesn’t permanently store your selfie; the company “only keeps it for the time it takes to search for matches.”Hey this one ain’t so bad.— Kumail Nanjiani (@kumailn) January 13, 2018Travis Jarae, CEO of One World Identity (OWI), an identity research company, doesn’t think people need to fret about any privacy concerns.
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UK
From the free-throw line—a distance of just 15 feet—I can maybe put the ball in the basket about twenty per cent of the time.I’m not NBA material, but the league might consider drafting the guys from YouTube’s How Ridiculous, who just nailed a seemingly impossible 660-foot basketball shot.There isn’t a human alive who could throw a basketball that far, so the guys took advantage of the towering Maletsunyane Falls in Lesotho to pull off this trick shot.The group doesn’t mention how many missed attempts there were while they tried to snag this Guinness World Record, but they apparently spent six days at the falls so their shooting percentage was probably nothing to brag about.
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US
Google CEO Sundar Pichai wrote a blog post about Google’s investments in France.There are three different pieces of news in this announcement.First, Google is going to expand its office in Paris.If you already know Google’s current office in Paris, that building is going to stick around.The company is going to acquire or rent other buildings around Google’s current office and connect them together.In total, a thousand Google employees are going to be based in Paris.
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US
-- A type of battery first invented nearly five decades ago could catapult to the forefront of energy storage technologies, thanks to a new finding by researchers at MIT and other institutions.The battery, based on electrodes made of sodium and nickel chloride and using a new type of metal mesh membrane, could be used for grid-scale installations to make intermittent power sources such as wind and solar capable of delivering reliable baseload electricity.The findings are being reported today in the journal Nature Energy, by a team led by MIT professor Donald Sadoway, postdocs Huayi Yin and Brice Chung, and four others.Although the basic battery chemistry the team used, based on a liquid sodium electrode material, was first described in 1968, the concept never caught on as a practical approach because of one significant drawback: It required the use of a thin membrane to separate its molten components, and the only known material with the needed properties for that membrane was a brittle and fragile ceramic.These paper-thin membranes made the batteries too easily damaged in real-world operating conditions, so apart from a few specialized industrial applications, the system has never been widely implemented.But Sadoway and his team took a different approach, realizing that the functions of that membrane could instead be performed by a specially coated metal mesh, a much stronger and more flexible material that could stand up to the rigors of use in industrial-scale storage systems.
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US
SEATTLE—A little more than one year ago, I tried, and failed, to sneak into Amazon Go.Initially, it was limited only to Amazon employees.Worse, promises that the shop would open for average consumers in "early 2017" didn't come close to fruition, with insiders indicating to Ars that the store's camera-tracking system didn't hold up to larger testing scrutiny as anticipated.That same Seattle pilot shop—the one Amazon staffers refused to let us into in December 2016—finally opened its doors to anybody with a smartphone and the Amazon Go app.If you want to stroll into the world's first Amazon Go store, all you need is an Amazon account with valid credit card information and a working smartphone.a few cheerful people in official attire said as I approached, nearly in unison.
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