Kenneth Childs

Kenneth Childs

Followers 112
Following 23
US
Jason Statham's new giant-shark movie, "The Meg," is a fun action movie, but is best seen in 4DX, where the seats move and you're sprayed by water.The water effects were a tad disappointing, but you're not going to find that in any other theater experience.The new giant-shark movie, "The Meg," from "National Treasure" director John Turteltaub, is a dumb, fun action movie that's perfect to end the summer with.And if you're willing to shell out $30 a ticket on a movie where Jason Statham has a "Star Wars"-type battle with a shark (under water, of course), then 4DX is the best way to watch it.The seats move and vibrate during action-heavy scenes, too, and it's all in 3D."The Meg," in case you're unfamiliar, follows a former diver named Jonas Taylor (Statham), who is brought back into the game to stop a prehistoric, giant shark that has escaped a newly discovered region deep within the ocean.
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UK
Munich-headquartered integrator CANCOM has confirmed to the German stock exchange that it is buying British enterprise tech supplier OCSL for £29m in cash and shares.Founded in 1990, West Sussex-based OCSL resells hardware and software, hybrid cloud, and managed and consultancy services.It largely works with HPE, Microsoft, Cisco and VMware.The firm hired an investment house last year to seek out buyers, but a buy price might have held up the process, sources told us, and a significant drop in sales won't have helped.OCSL will be used as the "hub" for the group's UK activities and "establishes a substantial UK-based branch for the international managed services business of CANCOM", the German biz said .This is CANCOM's second takeover in the UK this year – it gobbled unified comms specialist Ocean Intelligent in March.
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UK
Ford really wants its workforce to be as efficient and safe as possible during their workday.This week the automaker announced that it was rolling out exoskeletons to some workers that must frequently lift objects above their heads.Ford is now showing off other tech that is meant to help it design less physically stressful workstations for line workers.Ford is using 70 workers from 21 work areas in the pilot.Each of those workers wears a special suit that is equipped with advanced body tracking tech.This is the same sort of tech professional athletes use to help them perfect their technique.
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NASA is sending a spacecraft to get up close and personal with a star for the first time, and it's going to have to go faster than any manmade object in history to get there."Our ability to forecast space weather is about as good as our weather forecasts were in the 1970s," Kristopher Klein, a co-investigator on the mission from the University of Arizona, said in a statement."If you have a better understanding of the behavior of these solar energetic particles, then you can make better predictions about when to send astronauts to Mars or protect a satellite before it gets ripped apart by a radiation burst."Yes, there is a ParkerThe Parker Solar Probe is the first NASA spacecraft with a living namesake, 91-year-old Eugene Parker, who's credited with discovering the existence of the solar wind, or constant flow of charged particles that the sun sends into the solar system, in the 1950s."Many of his colleagues thought he must be wrong, but when Mariner 2 was on the trip to Venus in 1962, it revealed that a supersonic wind was always present," says CalTech's Ed Stone, the longtime project scientist for NASA's Voyager mission who also worked with Parker at the University of Chicago in the 1960s.
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At a time when Carphone Warehouse is shutting stores and Maplin has gone out of business, it is noteworthy when a tech retailer decides to expand their physical footprint.But that’s exactly what repair specialist iSmash is doing, having announced plans 70 more locations over the course of the next three years.But iSmash believes trends in the mobile market, a lack of a major rival, and the availability of retail space make it an ideal time to expand.Julian Shovlin was inspired to found iSmash following an experience at university when he was unable to find someone to fix his damaged mobile phone.“I fixed my phone myself and thus the idea for iSmash was born,” he tells TechRadar Pro, adding that the popularity of smartphones and their increasing importance to everyday life made it seem like a huge gap in the market.The first store opened on the Kings Road in London in 2013 and there are now 26 locations on the high street, in train stations, and in shopping centres.
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UK
Cinemas and film companies have done lots of things to try and make a trip to the local multiplex more exciting, including large IMAX screens, 3D films, and so on.Now the Cineworld at Greenwich's O2 has a new gimmick, and it involves three cinema screens that are designed to expand the field of view and offer a more immersive experience.ScreenX, as its called, was founded in South Korea back in 2015 and has added its triple-wall screen to 139 cinemas across the world.But none of them have ever been installed in the UK until now, and Cineworld has exclusive rights to add the tech to 100 UK cinemas and a few select locations in the US.The idea is that the main screen shows the same footage you'd see at any other cinema, while combining with special shot footage on either side to offer a 270-degree view of what's going on.Apparently this extra footage isn't essential, but is instead designed to fill up your peripheral vision with supplementary content.
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US
There’s no lack of fantastic movies and shows that prove the bonds a sport can forge are perfect fodder for gripping stories.The major players in sports games — Madden, FIFA, NBA 2K, and MLB The Show — have only recently started to explore the role of stories, with varying degrees of success (emphasis on the word “varying”).The less game, the better.I still love the original Longshot, but the utter disaster which is Madden 19’s Homecoming has forced me to re-think why I was enamored with its predecessor.Longshot: Homecoming continues the story of best friends Devin Wade and Colt Cruise.“Four times the gameplay” sounds great at a glance.
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UK
Remote management a double-edged sword, IT admins warned at hacking conferenceBlack Hat Data centers are vital in this cloudy world – yet little-understood management chips potentially give hackers easy access to their servers in ways sysadmins may not have imagined.They are discrete microcontrollers popped into boxes by the likes of Dell, HPE, and Lenovo to allow data-center managers to control machines without having to brave the chilly confines of a server farm.BMCs can be used to remotely monitor system temperature, voltage and power consumption, operating system health, and so on, and power cycle the box if it runs into trouble, tweak configurations, and even, depending on the setup, reinstall the OS – all from the comfort of an operations center, as opposed to having to find an errant server in the middle of a data center to physically wrangle."They are basically a machine inside a machine – even if the server is down, as long as it has power, the BMCs will work,” said Nico Waisman, VP of security shop Immunity, in a talk at this year's Black Hat USA hacking conference on Thursday.Waisman and his colleague Matias Soler, a senior security researcher at Immunity, examined these BMC systems, and claimed the results weren’t good.
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UK
With films increasingly viewed and consumed in the home, and even high-profile releases like Annihilation and The Cloverfield Paradox skipping movie theatres entirely, it’s harder than ever to entice audiences into coughing up for a big-screen experience.ScreenX hopes to change that.Founded in South Korea in 2015, ScreenX is already running at 139 locations worldwide, but this marks the first time it’s come to the UK.Cinema chain Cineworld has an exclusive deal to bring ScreenX’s technology to 100 locations across the country, while also fitting out a number of theatres in the US.But with the likes of 3D struggling to bring in audiences, can ScreenX find a place in the market?As far as the eye can see
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China
What happened: Chinese microblogging platform Weibo has reported a 68% year-on-year increase in net revenue to reach $426.6 million, driven mostly by ad sales.The company, which has 431 million users, has attracted companies like Alibaba Holdings which have spent millions on their Weibo-focussed digital marketing campaigns.As a result, Weibo’s ad revenue made up 87% of its total for the quarter.Why it’s important: Weibo has, at times, had trouble holding onto its users.The rise of competing social platforms has played a significant role in this.In 2014, Weibo saw its users drop from 331 million to 275 million.
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US
But while more and more transactions are passing through them, devices sold by four of the leading companies in the space—Square, SumUp, iZettle, and PayPal—turn out to have a variety of concerning security flaws.Leigh-Anne Galloway and Tim Yunusov from the security firm Positive Technologies looked at seven mobile point of sale devices in all."The very simple question that we had was how much security can be embedded in a device that costs less than $50?"The flaws could allow an attacker to disable chip-based transactions, forcing customers to use a less secure magstrip swipe, and making it easier to steal data and clone customer cards.In these types of frauds, customers rely on their banks and credit card issuers to insure their losses, but magstripe is a deprecated protocol, and businesses who continue to use it now hold the liability.The researchers also reported issues with firmware validation and downgrading that could allow an attacker to install old or tainted firmware versions, further exposing the devices.
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A NASA scientist wants to create a planetary robot that would mimic what biologists do every day in terrestrial laboratories: look through microscopes to visually identify microbial life living in samples.Although very early in its technology development, the concept would take NASA's hunt for extraterrestrial life to the next level by actually looking for bacteria and archaea in soil and rock samples.So far, NASA's rovers have carried tools and instruments designed to look for biosignatures or signs of life that indicate habitability, not life itself, regardless of how primitive."Life exists everywhere on Earth, even in places that are incompatible to humans," said Melissa Floyd, a scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, who is using Goddard Internal Research and Development program funding to automate subsystems for a laboratory breadboard called FISHBot."I had this idea, actually a major assumption on my part: what if life evolved on Mars the same way it did here on Earth?Certainly, Mars was bombarded with the same soup of chemistry as Earth."
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UK
That’s largely because there’s no way to know all the consequences that come with reflecting sunlight back into space, particularly when it comes to the agricultural system that has allowed humanity to flourish for millennia.That’s sent scientists scrambling to find clues about what would happen, and there’s no better place to look than volcanoes.A new study in Nature uses two historic eruptions to gauge how a global program of reflecting sunlight away from the Earth’s surface – an idea known as solar geoengineering – could impact agriculture.Specifically, they looked at how many aerosols – fine particles suspended in the atmosphere that have a cooling effect on the climate – the eruptions of Mount Pinatubo in 1991 and El Chichon in 1982 put into the atmosphere.Their findings show that Pinatubo and to a lesser extent, El Chichon put a damper on agricultural output.For Pinatubo, corn yields were depressed by 9.3 percent and soy, rice, and wheat by 4.8 percent.
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Dr Alison Wall, EPSRC's Associate Director, Building Leadership, said: "The Inclusion Matters call projects display ambition, creativity and a commitment to addressing the pressing equality and diversity issues facing engineering and the physical sciences."The Inclusion Matters initiative illustrates the ambitious, evidence-based approach that we will take across UKRI to strengthen equality, diversity and inclusion across the sector."It focuses on delivering cultural change and such radical transformation requires deep institutional commitment.For further information please contact the EPSRC Press Office on 01793-444-404 or email pressoffice@epsrc.ukri.orgA full list of project summaries can be found below.Promoting Equality, Diversity and Inclusion in University Spinout Companies - A Case for Action - EP/S010734/1
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US
New York City's local council has pressed pause on granting new licences to ride-hailing firms for one year, blaming companies such as Uber and Lyft for the city's congestion problems.The package of measures outlined by the city's mayor Bill de Blasio overnight also includes setting a minimum wage for drivers, after the New York Taxi Workers Alliance said low incomes had been a contributing factor to six suicides among drivers in recent months.The package, which will implement a 12-month ban on issuing new for-hire vehicle licences excluding those which are wheelchair-accessible, has been vehemently opposed by the major ride-hailing firms operating in New York.The news marks the first time a large US city has slapped a cap on ride-hailing firms, with New York City to date being a major source of revenue for those companies.Uber said in a statement that the pause will threaten ride-hailing firms as a viable transport option for New Yorkers, while "doing nothing to fix the subways or ease congestion".Lyft concurred, adding: "These sweeping cuts to transportation will bring New Yorkers back to an era of struggling to get a ride, particularly for communities of colour and in the outer boroughs."
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UK
Again, we're here with some good news and some bad news about Extreme Heatwave 2018 and its effects on the country.The good news for one particular Scottish farmer is that it's been decent enough weather to get a hay crop in, the bad news is that it was so hot and dry – yes even in Scotland – that the grass grew more slowly than usual, hence the cancellation of this year's Invercharron Highland Games that really has to use that exact same hay field.Fields are apparently hard to come by, as the organisers explained: "The farmer, whose field we use, grows his winter feed hay crop in the field and because of the exceptionally dry weather we have had, the crops are growing too slowly and as a result he will not be able to harvest before the games and the feed is urgently needed.There is not enough time for us to find another field nor apply for a new public entertainment licence so we have no alternative other than to cancel this year."So there will be no tossing of cabers, pulling of ropes, sheep wrestling or whatever it is they do on September 15, but there will be dinner for sheep all winter, which is probably more important.
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UK
A doctor has warned that those visiting the Real Bodies exhibition that's currently in Birmingham ought to feel a little more queasy than expected when viewing the collection of plasticised bodies, as questions over the identities of those who are on display have been raised.Consultant neurologist Dr David Nicholl is leading the quest to have the pasts of the exhibits investigated and made known, as he believes that the bodies, provided by China's Dalian Medical University, could perhaps have been sourced from nearby labour camps, and may even have once belonged to executed prisoners who presumably were not asked for consent to be preserved and put on display.The fact that most of the bodies are young males is a big clue, Nicholl says, as young male people don't tend to die by themselves that much.He explained: "I have huge questions about why all these unclaimed bodies come from Dalian in sizeable numbers and how many bodies Imagine Exhibitions have actually got ...They are all young men – none of them are elderly, which I have to say is pretty suspicious given that there are a number of labour camps within a matter of hours' drive of Dalian."The show has been touring the world for years, and raises similar concerns wherever it turns up.
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US
Previously delivered WhatsApp messages can reportedly be tweaked to change the content or the sender's identity, security researchers say.Check Point Software Technologies found that hackers can create a hacked version of the app and alter a quoted message (a past one that someone is replying directly one) to change the content or sender, The New York Times reports.WhatsApp told the Times that it works to remove people using hacked versions of its service, but said the ability to manipulate quotes wasn't a flaw.Verifying each message would create privacy issues or slow the app down too much.Neither WhatsApp, which is owned by Facebook, nor Checkpoint immediately responded to requests for comment.Both companies told the paper that they hadn't seen regular people sending fake quoted messages within the service, so this problem appears to be limited to security researchers.
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UK
After checking it out briefly when it first announced, I was prepared to hate the Samsung Galaxy Tab S4.Sporting outdated specs similar to last year’s Galaxy Note 8 (except with 2GB less of RAM and worse cameras), no fingerprint reader, and a price tag of £600 (and that’s not including its keyboard dock), the Tab S4's underlying components just didn’t make sense.A 10.5-inch tablet with a focus on mobile productivityLIKE: Gorgeous screen, solid build, big batteryDON'T LIKE: Dated specs, no fingerprint reader, optional keyboard cover isn’t really optional and lacks a touch pad, and it’s too expensiveBut I wanted to give the Tab S4 a fair shot, so I took it with me on a trip out of town, with the Samsung’s new tablet as my only computer aside from a phone.
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That last one might sound familiar; an accidental missile alert in January sent Hawaii's residents scrambling, while a hack set off Dallas's tornado sirens last year.“The reason we wanted to focus on hubs was that if you control the central authority that runs the whole show then you can manipulate a lot of information that’s being passed around,” Crowley says.“It appears to be a huge area of vulnerability, and the stakes are high when we’re talking about putting computers in everything and giving them important jobs like public safety and management of industrial control systems.When they fail, it could cause damage to life and livelihood and when we’re not putting the proper security and privacy measures in place bad things can happen, especially with a motivated and resourced attackers.”The researchers found basic vulnerabilities, like guessable default passwords that would make it easy for an attacker to access a device, along with bugs that could allow an attacker to inject malicious software commands, and others that would allow an attacker to sidestep authentication checks.The researchers contacted officials from a major US city that they found using vulnerable devices to monitor traffic, and a European country with at-risk radiation detectors.
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