Kevin Murphy

Kevin Murphy

Followers 108
Following 38
UK
We all bemoan Valentine’s Day, but whether you hate the commercialisation or soppy sentiment, many of us will still find ourselves buying cards by 14 February.The whole thing is a bit of a minefield, to be honest.You might be a Valentine’s denier but don’t want to get in trouble with your partner for forgetting.Or you’re with someone new and don’t want to go OTT... but equally don’t want to show up empty-handed.With that in mind here are 10 nonchalant cards that will make you look like you don’t give a damn, without hurting anyone’s feelings.[Read More: 11 Filthy Valentine's Day Cards If Romance Isn't Your Thing]
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In Spenny vs Penny we compare the products we love, with those following in their (sometimes pricey) footsteps.Are they worth the cash?Here, we try to find the best lengthening mascara – trying each for a few days to see the results.Spenny: Benefit Beyond Lengthening Mascara, 8.5ml, Benefit, £22I’ve heard people bang on about Benefit makeup (most notably the mascara) since forever, so when I excitedly applied it for the first time, I expected big results.The best part about this mascara is the brush, which combs lashes evenly and clump-free.
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China
Huawei Targeted in U.S. Criminal Probe for Alleged Theft of Trade Secrets – WSJWhat happened: Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei could face charges over the theft of trade secrets in a new investigation.US federal authorities in Seattle are pursuing charges against Huawei for allegedly stealing trade secrets from US business partners.The secrets include a T-Mobile robotic device called “Tappy,” which is used in testing smartphones.In a 2014 filing, T-Mobile claimed that Huawei employees stole the trade secrets for the company’s research and development in China.The investigation is reportedly at an advanced stage, and an indictment could come soon.
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Most Facebook users have no idea that the ad biz compiles data profiles of their online activities and interests, according to research conducted by the non-profit Pew Research Center.It's worth recalling that a decade ago, Google representatives stopped people on the street in New York City to ask "What's a web browser?"The finding nonetheless underscores the privacy cost, unrecognized though it may be, of relying on an ad platform for media and messages rather than wrestling with the complexity of self-administered comms software.After surveying 963 US adults last year between September 4 to October 1, Pew researchers found that 74 per cent of Facebook users said they were unaware the social ad biz tracks their traits and interests.Facebook makes such data available to users through the "Your ad preferences" page, but about half of the survey respondents didn't like what they saw once they were made aware of their data trail.Fifty-one per cent of those surveyed said they're not comfortable with Facebook compiling this information.
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Electric scooter companies Bird and Lime have scattered thousands of rentable, dockless, electric scooters across US cities over the last year.And one complaint keeps coming up: they block sidewalks.Advocacy group Disability Rights California is now suing the two companies in federal court in San Diego for allegedly violating the Americans with Disabilities Act.The group, which is seeking class-action status for the case, says Bird and Lime are obstructing public sidewalks, making them unsafe for people with mobility and sight disabilities."The scooter companies have treated our free public walkways as their own private rental offices, show rooms and storage facilities," said Bob Frank, lawyer for Neil, Dymott Attorneys, which filed the case in conjunction with Disability Rights California.But the scooters have become a controversial topic.
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US lawmakers are pondering the best way to regulate consumer privacy, and they've put forward several bills in the past few months.Now Sen. Marco Rubio is adding his to the list.Rubio, a Republican from Florida, introduced on Wednesday the American Data Dissemination Act (PDF), saying in a press release that it would protect consumers while allowing businesses to innovate.What's more, the bill "will protect small businesses and startups while ensuring that consumers are provided with overdue rights and protections," Rubio said in a statement.The bill follows one introduced in December by a group of 15 Democratic senators that has tech industry support, and another drafted by Sen. Ron Wyden, a Democrat from Oregon, in November.In September, Rep. Suzan DelBene introduced a privacy bill to the US House of Representatives.
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Israeli company was 'feeling lucky' but lost outGoogle has won a patent dispute over its famous "I'm feeling lucky" button that immediately connects a user to its top-raking search link with a single click.The search engine giant was sued in 2016 by Israeli company Spring Ventures (previously Buy2 Networks) for allegedly infringing on its patent, US 8,661,094, that covers displaying a web page without extra user input.Soon after it started sending letters to Google insisting that its button infringed at least 14 separate aspects of the patent because it allowed users to reach a webpage without providing a specific URL.That may sound like a harsh putdown but in the rarefied world of patent law, the term "obvious" has a tediously precise meaning.You can read the full decision to find out precisely what it means but we don't recommend it: patent lawyers have habit of turning written English into a gaspingly turgid explanation of a concept.
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Fitbit and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on Wednesday launched an initiative called the Fitbit Bring-Your-Own-Device (BYOD) project.It's the first digital health technology initiative for the All of Us Research Program, a precision medicine study hoping to improve the prevention and treatment of disease "based on individual differences in lifestyle, environment and genetics."Fitbit users currently enrolled in All of Us can opt to sync their Fitbit accounts to help researchers gain insights into the relationships between indicators like physical activity, heart rate, sleep and health outcomes.The incorporation of that data could help build a diverse data set for research.Participants will be invited to share health information through surveys, electronic health records, physical measurements, biosamples and digital health technologies.There will be "strict safeguards in place" to protect the privacy of participants, Fitbit said in a release.
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The Pew Research Center today released the results of its latest survey of Facebook users, this time about the ad categories they’ve been assigned by the site’s algorithms.The users’ surprising ignorance of the information Facebook accrues highlights the disconnect between the platform and its users.According to the results, several users weren’t even aware of the list of ad categories Facebook keeps on them: 74 percent said they “didn’t know the categories existed.” So just to get everyone up to speed, Facebook allows you to browse the ad categories to which it’s assigned you.Not everyone gets a list — the study found 11 percent weren’t assigned categories.But that means that, of the people who did get a list, 88 percent weren’t aware of it until they were directed to the page.When asked about the accuracy of the categories, users admitted Facebook was right more than not.
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The future of local journalism, and the fate of the reporters telling those stories, is so worrisome if Digital First Media’s hostile bid for Gannett goes through, media buyers are concerned about what might remain once the dust settles.Digital First Media is a hedge-fund-backed group, otherwise known as MNG Enterprises Inc., that submitted an unsolicited, roughly $1.36 billion bid for Gannett on Monday.The company, which currently owns about 100 properties, including the Boston Herald, The Denver Post and The Mercury News, already has a massive reach.Digital First Media, known for buying publications and quickly cutting costs throughout its newsrooms, is taking advantage of what it sees as a “distressed member” of a “distressed” industry, said a media buyer, who spoke on the condition of anonymity.“They’re going to pick it clean for what they can,” the buyer said.It’s not just a question of what’s out there in terms of places to place ads, but what’s out there in terms of quality journalism.”
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But while the object, which was discovered in October 2017 and is now making its way towards Saturn's orbit, has sparked much discussion about what it is, there is one thing it may not be, according to a new study.The study, written by John Forbes and Abraham Loeb of the astronomy department at Harvard University, suggests that there may be a great number of objects similar to Oumuamua floating around the Milky Way galaxy and humanity just had not looked for them.INTERSTELLAR VISITOR 'OUMUAMUA' NEVER SHOULD HAVE LEFT HOME, THEORIES SAY"We explore what may be learned by close encounters between extrasolar minor bodies like ‘Oumuamua and the Sun," Forbes and Loeb wrote in the study's abstract.We find that such objects collide with the Sun once every 30 years, while about 2 pass within the orbit of Mercury each year."At its closest approach, Oumuamua was approximately 0.26 astronomical units (AU) away from the Sun or approximately 24.2 million miles.
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China
What happened: Two of China’s major mobile operators, China Unicom and China Telecom, have been censured by the central government for bad business practices.China’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT) published a list on Wednesday warning 29 enterprises for irregular operations and distorting markets in the telecommunications sector.Included are China Unicom’s arms in China’s northern Jilin province and eastern Fujian province, as well as an affiliate of China Telecom in the country’s Inner Mongolia region.Why it’s important: The announcement marks the first blow of 2019 to China’s telecommunication market by the country’s industry regulator.Rule breakers are typically included in a government database of companies that have conducted illegal activities, which may limit their access to new business licenses.This is not the first time the Chinese government criticized state-owned mobile operators, more than 8,000 city-level telecommunication operators were blacklisted by the MIIT in 2018.
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YouTube has changed its policies in an attempt to cut down on potentially dangerous challenges and pranks, Engadget reported on Tuesday, updating its rules to explicitly ban them from the site.In a thread on the YouTube Help Community, a Google employee wrote that while the site already has rules banning “content that encourages violence or dangerous activities that may result in serious physical harm, distress or death,” it’s pushed out an update adding a section directly prohibiting challenges and pranks that could put people in serious danger or cause a child “to experience severe emotional distress”:YouTube is home to many beloved viral challenges and pranks, but we need to make sure what’s funny doesn’t cross the line into also being harmful or dangerous.We’ve updated our external guidelines to make it clear that we prohibit challenges presenting a risk of serious danger or death, and pranks that make victims believe they’re in serious physical danger, or cause children to experience severe emotional distress.While YouTube has previously removed videos related to specific challenges such as that one where people ate Tide Pods, the update appears intended to at least give the impression that it’s cracking down on the trend as a whole.The platform’s moderation team is infamously overwhelmed by the sheer amount of content on it, so whether this will work has yet to be determined.
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Security flaws dating back 36 years, to 1983, have been found to affect past and current versions of Secure Copy Protocol (SCP) implementations, a secure file-transfer protocol used in popular tools such as OpenSSH, PuTTy and WinSCP.The bugs could allow a malicious SCP server to make unauthorised changes to files on a client’s system and to hide malicious operations, said researcher Harry Sintonen of F-Secure.Sintonen said he has been working with vendors to patch the issues since last August, but at present they have only been addressed in WinSCP, which addresses them in release 5.14, issued in October 2018.SCP is a secure version of the Remote Copy Protocol (RCP), and the issues arise from RCP, Sintonen said.He said one of the issues is caused by SCP clients failing to verify whether the objects sent by the SCP server are identical to those that were asked for, meaning that altered documents can be sent.“This issue dates back to 1983 and RCP, on which SCP is based,” Sintonen said in an advisory.
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Tencent-backed WeChat banned three social networking rivals within one day on its platform—including Bytedance’s just-launched video-based messaging app Duoshan—taking China’s social media war up another notch in 2019.Other apps affected by the WeChat ban included: Kuairu Technology-owned, Smartisan-backed Liaotianbao, which is an updated version of the once-popular messaging service Bullet Messenger; and Matong, an anonymous social media app developed by Shenzhen-based Ringo.AI.All three apps were rolled out on Tuesday.WeChat blocked the download address of Bytedance’s Duoshan for “hazardous content complaints from users.” The blocking of Duoshan came as the app was being announced by its product manager during its launch event in Beijing.A spokesperson for WeChat declined to comment when contacted by TechNode on Wednesday morning.Bytedance is seen as a challenger to Tencent’s social media business by offering a fresher take on WeChat’s social patterns.
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Pic A tiny cotton seed brought to the Moon's surface by a Chinese spacecraft has apparently just sprouted, quite possibly making it the first Earth-based plant to start growing on our rocky satellite.Well, growing in a box very close to the surface, anyway.The People’s Daily, the official state media for China’s ruling Communist Party, tweeted a picture of the experiment, and claimed it is “humankind's first biological experiment on the Moon.”It’s not immediately obvious, but the growing seedling is nestled somewhere underneath the soil beneath the rectangular grating...First in human history: A cotton seed brought to the moon by China's Chang'e 4 probe has sprouted, the latest test photo has shown, marking the completion of humankind's first biological experiment on the moon pic.twitter.com/CSSbgEoZmC— People's Daily, China (@PDChina) January 15, 2019
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That's certainly true for nitrogen fertilizers.Nitrogen can enter the watershed, polluting aquatic ecosystems.Microbes can also convert the excess nitrogen into nitrous oxide, a greenhouse gas implicated in climate change."Managing nitrogen is vital for global food security," says Yuxin Miao, an agronomist at the University of Minnesota.The researchers found that one approach, active canopy sensor-based nitrogen management, is the most efficient.Sensor-based nitrogen management uses light sensors to actively monitor crop health and vitality.
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YouTube has published new policies for its video platform that state it won’t allow content depicting dangerous pranks and stunts like the Bird Box and Tide Pod challenges.The company wants to prevent creators from engaging in these activities and from encouraging viewers to participate.Its updated Community Guidelines address the issue as follows:Content that encourages violence or dangerous activities that may result in serious physical harm, distress or death violates our harmful and dangerous policy, so we’re clarifying what this means for dangerous challenges and pranks.YouTube is home to many beloved viral challenges and pranks, but we need to make sure what’s funny doesn’t cross the line into also being harmful or dangerous.We’ve updated our external guidelines to make it clear that we prohibit challenges presenting a risk of serious danger or death, and pranks that make victims believe they’re in serious physical danger, or cause children to experience severe emotional distress.
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In November, Twitter started testing an option to switch between algorithmic and chronological timelines in iOS, so users could opt to see either ‘Top tweets’ or the latest tweets from profiles they follow.It rolled out to iOS the following month, and it’s finally available on Android starting today.To try the new feature, simply update your app, and click on the :sparkles: button in the top right corner.Next, tap See latest Tweets to switch to a chronological timeline.You can switch back to Top tweets at any time by following the same steps.Starting today, tap to switch between latest and top Tweets.
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It’s clear at this point that the future of the automotive world revolves around bleeding edge technology that’s self-driving or, perhaps, even flying.But what if it’s none of those things?What if it’s a car that walks on four legs?Hyundai puzzled CES audiences the world over at this year’s event with a concept that focused on exactly this.It’s on-trend, with an electric power plant.But unlike the Tesla’s of the world, Hyundai’s “Elevate” concept ditches the wheels in favor of four legs capable of navigating nearly any type of terrain.
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