Larry Turner

Larry Turner

Followers 117
Following 21
US
A Graduate of the Greenville Founder Institute, Bandwagon is a company dedicated to providing college and professional level sports organizations with information about their fans so that they can improve the game-day experience and fill more seats.This is largely thanks to the company's CEO and founder, Harold Hughes.In 2011, Hughes received his MBA in Supply Chain and Information Management at Clemson University.A few years later in 2018, he earned a graduate certificate in Innovation and Entrepreneurship from Stanford University.In addition to being the CEO of Bandwagon, Hughes currently serves as a board member for both Rebuild Upstate and Brickyard Innovation Lab—both of which are located in Greenville.Brickyard Innovation Lab offers workspaces, mentorship opportunities, and education programs that help small businesses in the area make connections and find success similar to what Hughes has obtained through Bandwagon.
7
UK
At E3 last June, Bethesda dropped multiple bombshells, many of which still have to actually land in players’ hands.One of the most anticipated but also most doubted of the pack is Fallout 76, an online survival version of the widely popular franchise.The skepticism and concern mostly come from the Herculean task of bringing elements that made Fallout a hit to an online setting without also bringing the most hated elements of online games.One of the biggest worries Fallout fans have in this online version is how PK, short for player kill, is enabled everywhere.MMORPG history is filled with anecdotes of griefers who enjoy the game by making it unenjoyable for others, often through unwanted and unprovoked PvP.“Turn the assholes into interesting content.”
7
UK
Perhaps attempting to keep up with Apple's Dark Mode in the upcoming macOS 10.14 Mojave, Microsoft has announced that the next major release of Windows 10 will bet getting a Dark Theme for File Explorer.Available with Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 17733, members of the Windows Insiders program will be able to apply the new Dark Theme by going to Settings > Personalization > Colors and then selecting the 'Dark' option found in the 'Choose your app mode' section.Spurned on by the frequent requests of Windows Insiders, Microsoft's mission to apply a Dark Theme to File Explorer was much more difficult than one would expect, as it had to work within "legacy UI frameworks which don’t plug into that infrastructure automatically."In creating the new Dark Theme, Microsoft said it was mindful to "only change File Explorer (and the Common File Dialog) and not change common controls generally, which could break a lot of app experiences (such as making dark text in an app unreadable)."Along with aforementioned details, Microsoft's Dark Theme blog post describes the balancing act of choosing the right shades and tones for the new UI, stating it listened closely to its vocal Insiders in an effort to get it just right.While the new Dark Theme is currently only available to Insiders, it's likely that it will officially make its way into Windows 10 with the upcoming Redstone 5 update, which is expected to drop October 2018.
6
US
Tesla is facing a barrage of lawsuits from investors angry at founder Elon Musk's shock proposal to take the company private at $420 (£329) a share.The colourful entrepreneur dropped the bombshell on social media last week, claiming that funding for the move had been secured, driving shares up 11 per cent before its price retreated on Thursday.One lawsuit, filed by Tesla investor Kalman Isaacs, said Musk's tweets represented a "nuclear attack" on short-sellers, designed to "completely decimate" them.His lawsuit, alongside another filed by William Chamberlain, claim Musk and Tesla’s behaviour violates US securities law, and artificially inflates the company's share price.The $420 offer values Tesla at $71bn.As Musk owns 20 per cent of the company, he needs to find $57bn elsewhere to fund the move.
2
US
But when it comes to the devices themselves, the most crucial function they need to perform—beyond recording footage in the first place—is protecting the integrity of that footage so it can be trusted as a record of events.At the DefCon security conference in Las Vegas on Saturday, though, one researcher will present findings that many body cameras on the market today are vulnerable to remote digital attacks, including some that could result in the manipulation of footage.Josh Mitchell, a consultant at the security firm Nuix, analyzed five body camera models from five different companies: Vievu, Patrol Eyes, Fire Cam, Digital Ally, and CeeSc.Mitchell's presentation does not include market leader Axon—although the company did acquire Vievu in May.In all but the Digital Ally device, the vulnerabilities would allow an attacker to download footage off a camera, edit things out or potentially make more intricate modifications, and then re-upload it, leaving no indication of the change.Mitchell found that all of the devices he tested had security issues that could allow an attacker to track their location or manipulate the software they run.
2
US
And while generally speaking, people were once indifferent or oblivious to the way personal data was collected, the tide has certainly turned.In the wake of the Facebook/Cambridge Analytica scandal, people are more aware than ever of the tenuous nature of data collection, and more concerned about how securely tech and financial institutions catalog this data.And with good reason: according to the Identity Theft Resource Center, there were 1,579 data breaches in 2017, an alarming 44.7 percent uptick from the year before.The world of data is opaque – and it can be unsettling for citizens to hear about this personal data infringement in the media.Most people aren’t aware how their location data is being collected and used by companies like Facebook and Google.Typically, companies are just trying to build better products to survive in a dynamic, data-driven landscape – and well, ultimately please the end user.
6
US
For years, city and state governments around the country have been fighting over "sharing economy" issues.For years, city and state governments around the country have been fighting over "sharing economy" issues.Companies and lawmakers have learned to speak the same language, and they're finding compromises.These are no longer so often fights between companies that think they're entitled to be unregulated and governments that want to ban businesses they find new and suspicious.The scooter freak out did not lead to scooter bansA few months ago, there was a spate of articles about how everyone hates electric scooters, which had become ubiquitous in cities like San Francisco.
2
US
There's a viral Facebook post making the rounds that claims the News Feed is restricting what you see to just 25 friends.No, Facebook is not restricting the content you see on your News Feed to just 25 or 26 friends.It claims, in essence, that Facebook has implemented an algorithm change that means you will only see posts from a select few of your friends.The hoax encourages users to combat this by copying and pasting a faux-informative message about the "change" — and then asking users' friends to reply to the post.Here's one example Business Insider has seen (the wording often varies slightly):Hello Friends - I’m jumping on the bandwagon too....Fighting this Facebook algorithm change, because I’m noticing I am not seeing so many of my friends posts.
3
US
And if nobody brushes the ceiling before you arrive, that clump of dirt is going to scare the living hell out of you when it drops on your face at 2 a.m.The TV plays ads for a "local" cleaning service from the next town over, but that just happens to be 400 miles away.For locals, that means being resourceful, jury-rigging solutions to everyday problems that combine advanced 21st century tech with the low-tech reality of life on the frontier.As a kid in Australia, I'd grown up hearing about Coober Pedy: the town where everyone lives in a hole!Where dusty men in Crocodile Hunter hats mine rainbow-colored opals (Australia's national gemstone) and where they filmed Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome in 1985.I'm off to meet Andy Sheils, a local who's lived here for more than four decades and who runs the Underground Art Gallery as well as the local State Emergency Service and Mine Rescue volunteer group.
8
UK
The looming question seems to be: does the rise of AI and robots mean we are getting prepared for a future of mass joblessness coming?Fear not, in this article I will show you three invaluable skills you can learn and develop to adapt and future proof your employment over the next decade of technological change.Whether you are a student still in school, making your way through a degree, or have decades of experience in an office environment, here are three areas you should concentrate on developing in order to remain and continue to be relevant in an emerging AI workplace and world:When we have discussions about uniquely human skill sets, emotional quotient or EQ, which is also known as emotional intelligence, is the most important factor.Influential Harvard theorist, Howard Gardner, defines EQ as the level of your ability to understand other people, what actually motivates them and how to work cooperatively with them.Humans ultimately want to interact — they do not want to listen or follow a machine, literally or figuratively.
7
UK
One of the restrictions you have to put up with if you don't give Spotify a monthly subscription fee is having to sit through a certain number of ads while your music plays.Now the music streaming service is toying with the idea of letting users on the free tier skip these ads if they want.The idea, Spotify tells Adage, is that users only hear the advertising their actually interested in and advertisers get an audience that's more engaged with what they're trying to sell (and wouldn't pay for skipped ads).It's potentially a win-win for all involved."Our hypothesis is if we can use this to fuel our streaming intelligence, and deliver a more personalized experience and a more engaging audience to our advertisers, it will improve the outcomes that we can deliver for brands," says Spotify's Danielle Lee.At the moment the feature is only being tested with a limited number of users, and there's no indication if or when this is going to roll out to the Spotify community at large.
7
US
A 183-year-old law originally designed to regulate horse-drawn carriages is partly responsible for preventing buzzy Silicon Valley scooter startups from expanding to the UK.The 1835 Highways Act prevents cattle, horses, and "carriages" — like scooters — from riding the pavement.Two startups, Bird and Lime, have been in talks with UK regulators about bringing electric scooter hire to London, but can't launch unless the laws change.Anyone wanting to use one can find one nearby via an app, "unlock" it with the app, then hire it for a small fee per minute.And that's partly thanks to a 183-year-old act originally designed to stop nuisance behaviour from horse-drawn carriage drivers, and those driving cattle.Here's the specific passage banning animals and "carriages" from footpaths:
10
UK
And parents might understandably use them to keep youngsters quiet, especially in public places, or when relatives visit the house.It’s supposed to offer conveniences, such as the ability to download new content instantly or connect two Wi-Fi-enabled devices and let them work together.Some of the dangers associated with Internet-connected toys include the possibility of hackers breaking into the toys and listening to what kids say.It’s also worth noting hackers sometimes target smart toy manufacturers.If that happens, the resultant data breaches leak private information.When that occurred at VTech Electronics, the toy maker got fined $650,000 following charges of violating the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) and not appropriately securing collected data.
10
UK
Great shoes can be ruined by bad odors, but Panasonic says it has the solution.The company has introduced a new shoe deodorizing gadget that it says can remove smells from shoes in a few hours, restoring them to their non-smelly state.The model, MS-DS100, utilizes “nanoe X” and other technology to strip away the odors.Panasonic isn’t the first company to tackle shoe odors, but most solutions involve simple deodorizers that are inserted into the shoes, where they work passively to absorb the issue.These aren’t always effective, though, particularly for strong odors that can be present in gym and sports shoes.The MS-DS100 is an electronic device that produces ion particles via Panasonic’s nanoe X technology to eliminate these odors.
6
UK
Cryptocurrencies may be the money of the future, but in comparison to traditional fiat currencies, they lack a mature and diverse ecosystem of financial services.Addressing this is Compound, which launches in September, and wants to bring a functional, liquid money market to several significant cryptocurrencies.From launch, the platform will support Ether and ETH-based tokens, as well as TrueUSD (TUSD), Basic Attention Token (BAT), 0X (ZRX), and Augur (REP).Users (including hedge funds, individuals, and other decentralized applications) can lend their coins and tokens for interest, or borrow with some collateral down.Interest rates are adjusted algorithmically, based upon the fundamental guiding force of economics — supply and demand.From the outset, Compound has attracted some big names in finance.
3
US
So you can imagine how challenging it becomes when there's apps with security vulnerabilities that come pre-installed on multiple Android phones.Security researchers from Kryptowire, a security firm, found 38 different vulnerabilities that can allow for spying and factory resets loaded onto 25 Android phones -- 11 of them sold by major US carriers.That includes devices from Asus, ZTE, LG and the Essential Phone, which are distributed by carriers like Verizon or ATThe vulnerabilities are just the latest blow to Android, which suffers from the perception that it's a less secure mobile platform than Apple's iOS.Google has worked to repair its image, forcing security updates for vendors and pushing out malicious apps, but these kinds of revelations don't help.It's also a reminder that consumers need to be more vigilant when it comes to protecting the info on their mobile devices.Angelos Stavrou, Kryptowire's CEO, and Ryan Johnson, the firm's director of research, disclosed their findings at the DEFCON hacker conference on Friday.
7
US
A decent part of Fortnite's meteoric success has been the capability for players on non-Sony platforms to play the game with friends regardless of what console, mobile phone, or PC everyone is using.One side effect of that system, though, is that it pits players using handheld controllers or imprecise touchscreen controls against those using the more precise aiming of a keyboard and mouse.Developer Epic now says it will be taking steps to account for this potential imbalance soon.Community Manager JustMooney1 writes on Reddit that the company is "working on some matchmaking tech... that'll pair you against folks based on your choice of peripherals," meaning users playing with a keyboard and mouse will go against others using the same control scheme.Currently, the PS4 is the only console that officially supports mouse-and-keyboard controls for Fortnite—that support was recently restored after being inadvertently disabled in a recent update.Xbox One players can currently use third-party adapters such as the XIM4 to get those controls working on the console, as Microsoft continues to work on long-promised official mouse-and-keyboard support.
4
UK
One of the year’s most active meteor showers, the Perseids, will peak overnight Saturday into Sunday and Sunday into Monday, with 60 to 70 meteors per hour.But lots of Gizmodo readers live in cities.So, inspired by a friend’s tweet, I wondered – will city dwellers see the meteor shower?The short answer is, if you find a dark spot away from the streetlights and get your eyes adjusted, weather permitting, you might be able to see some.First off, the Perseids are an annual meteor shower caused by dust, left over from the 109P/Swift-Tuttle comet, streaking through the atmosphere.The shower is known for its large quantity of meteors, including the possibility of bright fireballs.
1
US
When designers select a method for simulating water and waves, they have to choose either fast computation or realistic effects; state-of-the-art methods are only able to optimize one or the other.Now, a method developed by researchers at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) and NVIDIA bridges this gap.The authors will present their work at the annual top conference for computer graphics: SIGGRAPH 2018, where IST Austria researchers are presenting a total of five different projects.Current water wave simulations are based on one of two available methods."Numerical" methods, on the other hand, can simulate a wide range of such effects, but are much more expensive computationally."Our method makes that breadth of scale and range possible, in real time."
6
UK
It’s long been thought that snug underwear can be bad for men’s semen quality, thanks to the warmer temperatures they can cause down below.And a new study out of Harvard University seems to confirm that suspicion.It found that men attending a fertility centre who regularly wore boxers had higher sperm counts and healthier sperm than everyone else.In addition to the samples, collected between 2000 to 2017, the men also disclosed various lifestyle habits, including what type of underwear they usually wore.Fifty-three percent of the men typically wore boxers.And these men, the authors found, had a sperm concentration that was on average 25 percent higher than men who said they stuck to jockeys, briefs, or bikinis.
5
More

Top