Neil Chestnut

Neil Chestnut

Followers 111
Following 26
US
Staunchly anti-streaming music lovers and those who don’t want to fully embrace the smartphone universe will be overjoyed to learn that Apple may be developing its first iPod Touch since 2015, according to Japanese supply chain blog Macotakara.The 6th-generation iPod Touch, which launched four years ago, has long been the last iPod model for fans of downloaded content to cling to.Many of those users have switched to subscribing to Apple Music, the company’s on-demand streaming service, as their hardware slowly faded into obscurity.Apple discontinued its iPod Shuffle and iPod Nano models two years ago, and the 2015 iPod Touch model is the only iPod that the company still sells.There are a few reasons why Apple may be considering revamping its now quite old iPod Touch design for the future.First and foremost, the older iPod Touch model is dated in terms of technology.
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Welcome to Hard Fork Basics, a collection of tips, tricks, guides, and advice to keep you up to date in the cryptocurrency and blockchain world.When Satoshi Nakamoto published the Bitcoin whitepaper, the concept of mining was pretty simple.Due to the relatively low level of complexity of Bitcoin‘s proof-of-work algorithm, at the time, mining could be done using a laptop.Like a lottery pool, where players pool their money together to play the lottery and split any winnings based on the initial investment, mining pools don’t pool investment, but pool processing power and computer resources.If you join a mining pool, you might start making a return in much less time, but you will only get a fraction of the reward you’d receive if you were mining solo.What’s going on beneath the surface?
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Supercomputing remains a tough place to do business, with Cray warning investors that it expects to report a siginifican net loss for both 2018 and this financial year.Today's announcement included the prediction that revenue in 2019 will grow “modestly” over a preliminary result of around $450m in 2018 (compared to a full-year 2017 revenue of $392.5m and loss of $133.8m).Telling the world it would bag predicted revenue of just $70m in the coming quarter (Q1 2019) also didn't send the HPC specialist's stock price tumbling: at the time of writing the company's shares were trading up slightly to $22.31, compared to $21.93 at opening.That $70m predicted for the coming quarter compares to $79m for Q1 2018, a quarter in which the company delivered a $25m net loss.Cray must be nostalgic for the heady days of 2015, when revenue was better than $724m.That was followed by a multi-year contraction in the supercomputer market, which CEO Peter Ungaro said in early 2018 had shrunk by 60 per cent, with sales sliding in the government and energy markets, and many customers extending the life of existing iron.
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UK
The Brexit vote loss by 230 votes was the largest in modern British history, with only a defeat in 1924 coming close.The Confederation of British Industry (CBI)’s Director General Carolyn Fairbairn said: “Every business will feel no deal is hurtling closer.All MPs need to reflect on the need for compromise and to act at speed to protect the UK’s economy.”Tesh Durvasula, President, Europe, of Data Centre provider CyrusOne, commented: “Last night’s vote on Brexit was grimly predictable.As a recent import from the US, I find myself looking on with a mixture of fascination and frustration.“Brexit or no Brexit, the explosion of technologies including AI, IoT and machine learning continues to gather pace.
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Chrissy Teigen is known for her honest takes on motherhood, and in a new interview she opened up about why she makes it a point to post about “real mum shit” online.As Good Housekeeping’s February cover star, the model and cookbook author dished on parenting, as she and her husband, singer John Legend, have two kids, Luna, two, and Miles, eight months.In the interview, she spoke about how her body changed after having kids and why it’s important for her to share her experience as a mum online ― including the time she posted a photo that showed her in postpartum mesh underwear.“Every morning when I look at myself in the mirror, I’m like, ‘Oh my gosh, how did it get here?My baby was, like, four pounds and I gained, like, 60 pounds, and that seems off!’ … But, you know, I think everyone’s body is just really different,” she said.“That’s why, my posts of real mum shit, and wearing the diaper, and having that mesh thing, and real postpartum business?
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UK
To better understand Dublin’s journey to become a tech hub, TechRadar Pro spoke with Patricia DuChene, General Manager EMEA at the work management and collaboration company Wrike.Dublin boasts the EMEA headquarters for the likes of Google, Facebook, Slack, LinkedIn, Dropbox, and Zendesk, as well as plenty of budding startups.Companies call Dublin their home for plenty of reasons - and not just the favourable tax environment.There are innovation schemes and a supportive business ecosystem, of course, but one of the greatest advantages to Dublin is the broad mix of talent that has collected from all over the EU and beyond.You have to go back 30 years, when the first technology firms, predominantly hardware, opened up a lot of opportunities for work in the burgeoning tech scene.The Irish government really understands this, and works hard to nurture talent at a grassroots level.
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Elon Musk’s SpaceX has gained accolades for its multiple successful launches of reusable rockets.Now, Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), wants to take this idea a step further and create the first rocket that has two reusable stages.According to a report from Times of India, ISRO is going to conduct advanced tests of this technology in June and July.For the recovery of the first stage, ISRO is going to follow SpaceX‘s method and land it on a pad situated in the sea.To recover the second stage, the Indian space agency will test an advanced version of it Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) – that was first tested successfully in 2016 – later this year.ISRO engineers will use computer controls to maneuver the RLV to land it on an airstrip and use it again later in another launch.
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TARIK KIZILKAYA via Getty ImagesYouTube has an issued a ban on all “dangerous” pranks in the wake of a various “challenges” which have resulted in death or injury.The video sharing platform rolled out updated community guidelines for creators, with new guidelines about so-called practical jokes.In a detailed FAQ, the platform said that it is prohibiting the uploading of videos that present a risk of serious danger or death.Also banned are pranks which make victims believe they’re in serious danger, even if they aren’t, or clips that cause children to experience “emotional distress”.YouTube has begun work to remove existing footage of these pranks and challenges from the platform.
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China
Tencent plugs holes, and boosts profits, with 163 new investments – SCMPWhat happened: Chinese tech giant Tencent made 163 investments in 2018—more than the 143 in 2017, according to recent IT Juzi report.While Tencent’s diversified portfolio ranges from live-streaming and online education to e-commerce, a quarter of its investments were in entertainment and culture.Tencent now has more than 600 companies in its portfolio.Why it’s important: Tencent’s core businesses, namely social media and gaming, have been facing increased government scrutiny and intense market competition.The company’s gaming revenue was in steady decline last year due to the government’s freeze on issuing game licenses.
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China
Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei denies firm poses spying risk–BBCWhat happened: In his first interview with foreign media in over three years, Huawei founder and CEO Ren Zhengfei said that his company has never been asked to spy for his country.There is no Chinese law that requires enterprises to “install mandatory backdoors” to gather intelligence, he said.In any case, the ex-army engineer said, Huawei wouldn’t comply with such requests.His statements in part address the recent arrest of a Huawei executive in Poland on spying charges; the employee has since been fired.Ren also spoke on the arrest and detainment of his daughter and CFO Meng Wanzhou.
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The word “timeline” itself suggests something chronological in nature.Back when social networks were simpler and less assuming, that was definitely the case.These days, however, they have redefined timelines to be anything but chronological, forcing you to see something that may have happened days ago just because it’s trending.Twitter is, fortunately, giving users back the ability to decide what they want to see first, but its wording makes it clear what its preference really is.Last month, Twitter announced the ability to switch between seeing top Tweets first or seeing the latest Tweets first.All you needed to do was to tap on that oddly named “Sparkle” icon to switch between the two options.
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None of the vendors Trend Micro investigated used encoding or special transmission protocols to send E-Stop packetsRadio frequency (RF) tools in widespread use to control cranes and other industrial equipment are easier to hack than an average garage door – putting industry at risk of production sabotage, system control, and unauthorised accessThat’s according to new research by cybersecurity enterprise Trend Micro which shows that industrial heavy machinery can be disrupted and even taken over by manipulating the poor security features in RF transmitters and receivers.RF Controllers: Command Spoofing is EasyWith typical industrial controllers that use RF highly susceptible to command spoofing, attackers can capture radio traffic, selectively modify the packets, and automatically craft arbitrary commands, the Japanese company’s researchers said.“An attacker can just be within the range of a construction site, pretend to be a bystander, hide a battery-powered, coin-sized device (with an inexpensive radio transceiver at that), and use it remotely to craft arbitrary packets to control an industrial machine or persistently simulate a malfunction.”
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You win some, you lose some, as they say.Though in the court of law, even a single loss can be devastating.But Apple can breathe a bit easier now that at least the regional court in Mannheim, Germany has verbally declared that it doesn’t infringe on the patents that Qualcomm insists it does.While that doesn’t immediately affect an earlier ban imposed in Munich, it could at least give Apple some legal leverage to have that decision reversed soon.Apple and Qualcomm have been throwing lawsuits at each other left and right and in different countries for different reasons.Apple’s complaints have leaned more on Qualcomm’s unfair and illegal business practices while Qualcomm has sued Apple for patent infringement.
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So it's 2019, and everything is backwards.Britain's breaking up with Europe.A plain ordinary egg is now the most-liked photo ever posted to Instagram, and that egg just emailed me.The account, titled world_record_egg, has 6.3 million followers.When asked about the account's merchandise offerings -- currently, two shirts that say, "I LIKED THE EGG" -- the response was, "We're dropping a new design every day, and giving 10 percent of that to a chosen charity."TMZ quoted a reported friend of Supreme Patty saying he was responsible, but the egg account later posted to TMZ via Instagram Stories that "we're still anonymous.
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Chinese tech giant Bytedance on Tuesday launched a video-based messaging app focused on sharing content with friends and family, as it moves to take on WeChat’s newly launched short-video features.The app, dubbed Duoshan, allows users to share disappearing videos with their contacts.The company has also removed the public “like” and “comment” buttons on videos, in what appears to be a move to ease the stress that comes with chasing affirmation online, instead only including them in private messages.“As Douyin’s user base has grown, we noticed that users not only share their videos on the platform but share them with close friends and families,” Zhang Nan, CEO of Bytedance-owned short video platform Douyin, known as Tiktok internationally, said at the launch event in Beijing.Several Chinese tech companies have attempted to create WeChat-like platforms.After Bullet Messenger’s downfall, Smartisan-backed Kuairu Technology has been beta testing its new messaging app, Liaotianbao.
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A film documenting the experiences of Chinese tech founders including Ofo’s Dai Wei and Smartisan’s Luo Yonghao has turned out to be a box office flop.Titled “Startups” in English and “Ignition Point” in Chinese (our translation), the movie premiered on Jan. 11, making just RMB 530,000 (around RMB 80,000) on its first day.The film recorded RMB 2.8 million in ticket sales as of Tuesday afternoon.Male moviegoers made up more than 60% of the audience, while around 30% of all views were between the ages of 20 and 24 years old.“White Snake,” an animated film also released on Jan. 11, made in excess of RMB 57 million by 1 p.m. on Tuesday.The disappointing results coincide with the recent fall from grace of two leads in the film.
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With Samsung basically putting a date on its Galaxy S10 and foldable phone, all attention might be on the company’s next flagships.But almost as if to remind the market that those aren’t its only offerings, Samsung has also launched teasers for its upcoming budget-friendly line, the Galaxy M. But whether it intended to or not, the Galaxy M20, one of the first of that new breed, has now all but known thanks to a few well-timed leaks.Samsung itself lead the way by practically revealing what the Galaxy M20 would look like.It will be the company’s first Infinity-V (or Infinity-U) screen, which is to say its first screen with a notch.Samsung also teases the phone’s large battery and, for the first time on a budget Samsung device, a USB-C port for fast charging.Naturally, the company isn’t saying anything about the details, but that’s what leaks are for.
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Japanese salarymen (or white-collar workers) love a drink or three at the nearest izakaya after work.However, getting home by train afterward – if trains are still running at all – can be a pain.To help them get a good night’s sleep, the world’s first capsule hotel was created in Osaka.Called the Capsule Inn Hotel, it came with sleeping pods, complete with televisions and alarm clocks.This allowed weary salarymen to crash for the night and recharge – on the cheap.Since then, various iterations of the concept have cropped up throughout the world, from the Philippines and India to Belgium and Iceland.
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A new report suggests Apple “might” make the switch to USB-C in 2019 on both the iPhone and iPad.The report, from supply chain blog Macotakara, claims Apple engineers are working on the USB-C transition but haven’t yet reached the reference design stage — meaning, it could miss the 2019 cut-off, pushing it to 2020.Macotakara, for those unfamiliar with the blog, has a sound track record, although not a perfect one.Take any rumors coming from a supply chain blog with a grain of salt.In other news from the same source, Apple is almost certainly making a charge into technology it abandoned just a few years back: the portable MP3 player.The last iPod Touch launched in 2015, and was available for $199 for 32GB of storage.
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Imagine walking into a theme park with a 6-year-old, and leaving just in time to drop them off at college, 12 years later.For fans of the game Roller Coaster Tycoon, these are obviously minor details.Some key in on coasters designed to snuff out their riders, and others create mile-a-minute thrill rides we’d never see at an actual theme park — mostly for liability reasons — Marcel Vos chose endurance over thrills in his coaster, “Wild Mouse.”Vos tapped every square pixel of digital real estate in his Roller Coaster Tycoon 2 theme park.Distance, though, is secondary to the sort of languid pace that makes your average waterpark’s lazy river seem like an interstellar dogfight in Star Wars.All told, Wild Mouse, if it were a real coaster, would meander through some 600 laps, each more boring than the last.
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