However, despite its promises, nanotechnology still seems to be stuck in the status of an emerging science," contend Assistant Professor Raphael Zingg of Waseda University and Dr. Marius Fischer of the Max Planck Institute for Innovation and Competition.

With their work published in Nano Today on February 22, 2019, they aim at shedding light on the issue of technology transfer; how can the knowledge developed by universities be transferred to private entities that will develop commercial products.

Their findings showed that patents filed jointly by private and public organizations are on the rise, albeit on a small level.

"While research institutions still develop the majority of their patents independently, our data fleshes out promising signs that private-public knowledge transfer is coming to fruition.

The two researchers found that though the number of nanotechnology patents filed jointly by private firms and research institutions may still be low in absolute terms, a sharp increase has occurred since the year 2000, and that in the most recent years, 8% of all patents have been filed jointly by private-public partners.

Additionally, they pointed out that private-public patent applications were filed with more patent offices than independently-developed public ones, and Prof. Zingg suggests that such willingness to obtain a wider geographical protection and to invest in patenting strategies imply high internal valuation.

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