A new investigation by The New York Times found that the internet's largest tech platforms are failing to effectively shut down the giant portions of online child sexual abuse material.

Massive inconsistencies across tech companies and platforms in addressing the material leave gaping holes that pedophiles and criminals easily exploit.

The online population of abusive content is growing and can remain online undetected, and children are often blocked from getting photos and videos of their abuse taken down, even long after their abusers are caught.

However, massive inconsistencies across tech companies and platforms in addressing the material leave gaping holes that pedophiles and criminals, like traffickers, easily exploit.

With pedophiles meeting on various chat apps and sharing images on cloud storage, tech companies are struggling to effectively shut down the sharing of material across the board, meaning that the online population of abusive content is growing and can remain online undetected, and children are blocked from getting photos and videos of their abuse taken down.

Two sisters told the Times that 10 years after their father recorded abusing them and posted it online, they live in fear long after he went to jail as photos and videos of them were found in over 130 previous child sexual abuse investigations.

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