The new app will be available later this summer.On stage at the Google I/O developer conference, Erik Kay explained how assistive technology can make messaging more productive and expressive.

Messaging isn t just about text; smart replies have stickers and emojis too, Kay said.Another interesting aspect of Allo is when you send people photos through the app.

During a demo on stage, a picture of a Burmese dog was shown and Allo displayed three options.

You could either say awww, or perhaps cute dog, or get more specific.You can also use Google Assistant to play games such as guessing movies based on emojis, finding out sports scores, and more.

Think about it as being Google s counter to Facebook s M assistant, which is available to a limited few through Facebook Messenger.And Google isn t done consolidating all the features from other messaging services, including end-to-end encryption, private notifications, and more, likely alleviating security and privacy concerns people have in light of Edward Snowden and the FBI/Apple case.Reports first surfaced at the end of last year with sources telling The Wall Street Journal that Google was building a mobile-messaging service that taps its artificial intelligence know-how and so-called chatbot technology.

The move probably should not be surprising, especially as applications like Line, WeChat, Skype, Slack, and Facebook Messenger have gotten into the bot market.Signs of development were furthered during this year s Mobile World Congress, where the company formed a partnership with multiple mobile operators such as Orange, Sprint, Deutsche Telekom, America Movil, Vodafone, and the wireless standards body GSMA to roll out the Rich Communication Services for Android.

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