ARM-based chips dominate smartphone and tablets, but the new chips from Cavium and Marvell show the processors are maturing quickly for use in servers.

But ARM server chips are becoming more competitive with support for DDR4 memory and the latest I/O and networking technologies.

Despite struggling for years, ARM server chip makers are holding on to create alternatives for Intel's Xeon chips, while hoping the market for their products becomes viable.

In a research note issued Tuesday, IDC said ARM server chip makers will start gaining traction next year.

Marvell's new Armada 7000 and 8000 family of ARM-based chips don't provide the high levels of performance delivered by Cavium's ThunderX2, but they are aimed at smaller home office deployments.

Marvell did not respond to comment on shipment dates.

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