It has been a tradition since 1991 for China s state television broadcaster, CCTV, to co-hold an annual gala with government agencies on March 15, World Consumer Rights Day, for the sake of protecting consumers rights.

The program this year featured mostly tech companies, including the biggest e-commerce site, Taobao, and the food delivery unicorn Ele.me, exposing their acts of infringement and fraud.Let s have a look at what Chinese consumers are complaining about and how companies responded to the charges.Photo from Baidu ImagesEle.meSafe and healthy foods are almost like a luxury product for Chinese people.

Reports allege that this platform has provided food from unsanitary, and even unlicensed, restaurants due to the loose process Ele.me employs to authorize a restaurant to operate and the slack regulations they use.Ele.me responded through its official WeChat account saying, Dear consumers, we pay close attention to the problems reported and have formed a new task force to investigate the license validity of all restaurants, and will delist all illegal restaurants.

On Thursday, Ele.me announced it had delisted 25,761 illegal restaurants.

This still didn t save Ele.me from being singled out by CCTV for criticism.Last December, Alibaba invested USD 1.25 billion in Ele.me, pushing its valuation to USD 4.5 billion.Photo from www.jiqiren365.comDJIThe red-hot drone maker is also on the blacklist .

Experts expressed concerns that once a security hole emerged on smart terminals or equipment, criminals could take advantage of the loophole to remotely control the equipment, threatening the physical and property security of consumers.

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