If you’re like most of us at Digital Trends, the prospect of surfing the web on a cell phone never seemed tangible until iPhone entered the market in 2007.

Sure, we all knew the LG Prada, Windows Mobile phones, and old Blackberries were capable of browsing the web, but none one of them popularized mobile browsers to the degree the iPhone would several years later.

Older mobile browsers loaded pages and images at a glacial pace by today’s standards, drastically lagging behind Safari and other popular offerings from key developers like Google, Mobotap, and Opera.

What could have been a convenient way to peruse the web on the go was, more often than not, simply more trouble than it was worth.

Safari, Apple’s proprietary web browser, sported a streamlined interface, remarkable speed, and a toolset worthy of competing with even the most industrious desktop browsers on the market, but it’s no longer the only available option.

It’s exceptionally quick, offering an address bar that conveniently doubles as a search box while touting the ability to swap between an infinite number of tabs or privately browse the web using the software’s built-in Incognito tab.

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