While 3-D movies continue to be popular in theaters, they haven't made the leap to our homes just yet -- and the reason rests largely on the ridge of your nose.

Theaters generally either use special polarized light or project a pair of images that create a simulated sense of depth.

But researchers from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) aim to change that with "Home3D," a new system that allows users to watch 3-D movies at home without having to wear special glasses.

According to postdoc Petr Kellnhofer, these displays are rapidly improving in resolution and show great potential for home theater systems.

"Automultiscopic displays aren't as popular as they could be because they can't actually play the stereo formats that traditional 3-D movies use in theaters," says Kellnhofer, who was the lead author on a paper about Home3D that he will present at this month's SIGGRAPH computer graphics conference in Los Angeles.

In a user study involving clips from movies including "The Avengers" and "Big Buck Bunny," participants rated Home3D videos as higher quality 60 percent of the time, compared to 3-D videos converted with other approaches.

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