Hot, sunny weather could degrade future fifth-generation or "5G" cellular transmissions by more than 15% -- which could mean more dropped calls in places like Florida and the Middle East -- but an Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University engineer says research will guide solutions.

Forthcoming 5G cellular systems could support applications requiring ultra-fast processing speeds by tapping into super-high frequency radio waves, which would offer 10 to 100 times more computing space than today's 4G cellular systems.

But, how would bright sunshine affect such high-speed transmissions?

To answer this question, Ahmed Sulyman, an associate professor in Embry-Riddle's Prescott, Ariz.-based Department of Computer, Electrical, & Software Engineering, teamed up with colleagues in Saudi Arabia to publish the first comprehensive analysis of solar radio emissions on land-based wireless communications systems at 60 Gigahertz (GHz) bands.

Future 5G cellular systems using 60 GHz bands might work better at night because solar radio emissions seem to degrade such transmissions.

"Once we understand the exact nature of solar radio interference on 5G networks, we can plan for it by optimizing links for day-time and night-time operations."

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