Over the last few years, millions of Chinese workers managed to earn extra money by being ride-hailing drivers.

Most drivers on Didi Chuxing — the startup that captured 90 percent of China’s e-hailing trips in 2017 per consulting firm Bain & Company — were part-time.

That’s according to a report Didi put out in October 2017, which said half of its drivers worked less than two hours a day.

The all-encompassing term, which includes shared platforms from mobility to elderly care services, raked in $764 billion in 2017, shows a report by China’s Sharing Economy Research Center of the State Information Center.

Municipal governments across the country have nuanced stipulations for what these certificates entail, but in general, the fresh rules aim to more closely vet drivers transporting passengers around.

To obtain the ride-hailing driver’s permit in certain cities, drivers must own a local hukou, the residency permit that controls where people can legally work.

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