From Marketing Land:VR is coming to the Google Play store this fall with DaydreamMay 18, 2016 by Ginny MarvinGoogle s new Daydream platform is set to deliver virtual reality to Photos, YouTube, Street View, apps and movies.Amazon reaches $100B in annual salesMay 18, 2016 by Amy GesenhuesCEO Jeff Bezos says Amazon is the fastest company ever to reach the $100 billion sales milestone.Google I/O Live Blog: Home voice-activated assistant, Allo messaging app announcedMay 18, 2016 by Danny SullivanGoogle announces its rival to the Amazon Echo, unveils yet another messaging app.How to understand the value of content and measure digital emotionMay 18, 2016 by Erika TrautmanColumnist Erika Trautman explains why marketers need to go beyond surface metrics and instead focus on delivering personalized content.Recent Headlines From Search Engine Land, Our Sister Site Dedicated To Search News & Information:Online Marketing News From Around The Web:AnalyticsContent MarketingConversion OptimizationCopywriting, Design & UsabilityDomaining.Top Blows Past .Biz To Become The 6th Most Registered Top Level Domain, www.thedomains.com.VIP breaks new TLD launch records, domainnamewire.comE-CommerceCould Guided Selling Help Your Ecommerce Store?, www.practicalecommerce.comEBay eyes huge opportunities to personalize shopping through artificial intelligence, www.retaildive.comGap CEO says the company would be delusional not to consider selling on Amazon, qz.comIs omni-channel retail a delusion?, econsultancy.comTop Ecommerce Merchandising Tactics, smallbiztrends.comEmail MarketingIndependence Day Email Campaigns: Don t throw away your shot!, blog.movableink.comThe Time-Saving Secret to Grow Your Email List, blogs.constantcontact.comGeneral Internet MarketingBrand Personification: The Ultimate Way to Get to Know Your Brand, www.marketingprofs.comHow to Grow Marketing Innovation In-House, adage.comHow to Personalize Ads & Stop Annoying Users, blog.marketo.comInternet Users Want a More Personalized Ad Experience Report , www.adweek.comSteal This Sales Tool to Beef Up Your Marketing Strategy, www.convinceandconvert.comWhy You Must Get Scrappy with Your Marketing, www.ducttapemarketing.comInternet Marketing IndustryAberdeen Group Partners With Bombora to Offer B2B Intent Data, www.marketwired.comCrossInstall Expands Team with Former Chartboost Executive Anuj Kucheria On Board as New Vice, www.ireachcontent.comHookLogic Expands Network in Effort to Extend Brand Clout, adage.comOpenprise Announces Free Diagnostic Tool to Assess the Readiness of Companies Lead & Contact Data for Marketing Automation, Account Based Marketing, & Predictive Analytics, openprisetech.comYuMe Doubles Up on Protection for Advertisers and Brands with Native SDK-Driven Brand Safety and Integral Ad Science s Bid Expert, www.yume.comMarTechMarketers Struggle to Balance Marketing Technology Tools and Talent, www.emarketer.comMarTech Advisor Investscape Q1 2016 – Analyzing the $2240.51 Million Martech Investments that Kicked Off the Year, www.martechadvisor.comWhy chief digital officers are all the rage, www.internetretailer.comMobile/Local Marketing5 Things You Need to Know About Mobile Ad Blocking, www.tune.comA better approach to app monetization, venturebeat.comBig Updates for Yahoo Mail Apps, yahoomail.tumblr.comThis one factor keeps people coming back to their favorite apps, www.businessinsider.comWhy marketers should be A/B testing mobile apps, www.retaildive.comReputation ManagementTo rebrand, or not to rebrand?That is the question, econsultancy.comSocial Media Here and Now – Facebook s First 3D-360 Film, media.fb.com11 Little-Known Facebook Features You can Try Today, www.searchenginejournal.com2012 LinkedIn Security Breach Strikes Again, www.adweek.com4 Secrets to Building Social Momentum, contentmarketinginstitute.com5 Steps to Improve Your Customer Service Using Twitter, www.socialmediaexaminer.com6 Proven Strategies for Successfully Promoting Content Across Social Media, blog.bufferapp.comFacebook blocked in Vietnam over the weekend due to citizen protests, techcrunch.comGoogle and Facebook still dominate tracking on the web, www.theverge.comHow Snapchat Discover Competes with Facebook Instant Articles and Twitter Moments, simplymeasured.comHow Sports Fans are Using Facebook Reactions, www.newswhip.comHow To Create Perfect Posts, unbounce.comHow to Find Facebook Post Ideas for Higher Organic Reach, www.razorsocial.comHow To Use Facebook Chat Bots to Market Your Business, smallbiztrends.comHow To Use Snapchat Effectively For Marketing, www.searchenginepeople.comPublishers and brands, get ready for the Snapchat algorithm, digiday.comSnapchat s newest power users: Entrepreneurs with advice for startups, digiday.comSnapchat s shoppable ads can unlock data, sales if relevant, www.mobilecommercedaily.comSocial Contests in 2016 – Why You Can t Ignore Them, www.jeffbullas.comWhat if Facebook Gave Us an Opposing-Viewpoints Button?, www.wsj.comWhy Employees Don t Share Company News on Social Media, www.marketingprofs.comVideoAbout The AuthorAmy Gesenhues is Third Door Media's General Assignment Reporter, covering the latest news and updates for Marketing Land and Search Engine Land.
The real reason people are turning on ad blockers is less about annoying ads and more about the invisible tracking that goes on behind them, according to a new report by Secret Media.Ads take up just 9% of the space on a web page, but are accountable for 54% of the load time, the study found.This results from the data tracking and cookies that come with ads.The theory is that frustration at this slow load time is causing people to turn on ad blockers."We believe that the misuse and lack of control over advertising technologies is a major, if not the major, contributing factor to the increasing use and adoption of Ad blocking solutions," the report said."It is our hypothesis that advertising technologies are negatively impacting publisher websites," it added.Here are the key findings of the study for US publishers:Secret Media looked at the webpages of 25 top US media companies.The load time, bandwidth, and URL requests of pages with ad blockers switched on were compared with the results of the same pages with ad blockers switched off.The data is anonymized, but for all publishers, ads significantly increased load times.The top 25 media companies included CBS, Vice, The Huffington Post, NBC, and Business Insider.The effect of ads on load time is clear:The study found similar results in Germany and France, where the adoption of ad blockers is also very high.NOW WATCH: This smart earpiece translates languages as they are spokenLoading video...
Google market share in the US currently stands at 63.8 percent, with Bing including Yahoo s search volume coming in at 33.5 percent, according to January 2016 comScore data.Most of us think of Google as a search engine, and we tend to think of that as a website where you go to a search box and enter a search query.This suggests that the search engines themselves hold a somewhat broader view of what they do — one that isn t tied to a search box, or even the use of search commands in one given application.Now let s broaden that to think about it from a user perspective.Hence, content creators may focus more and more of their energy in these areas and start relying less and less on the traditional web for their income.To illustrate, of those that have the Facebook app installed, a full 48 percent consider it their number one app.
Facebook "in feed" ads will still be displayed.It has also cut a deal with Three Italy and Digicel in the Caribbean.The move marks another significant milestone in the growth of mobile ad blocking.Digital publishers and app developers will be watching closely — they stand to lose out on revenue should the trend really kick off.Speaking to Business Insider, Three chief marketing officer Tom Malleschitz explained the mobile carrier wants to improve the mobile experience by ensuring:Customers don't pay data charges to receive adsTheir privacy is protectedTheir experience isn't "degraded" by excessive, intrusive, or unwanted ads." That implies that Three would look to enact some kind of "acceptable ads" procedure, whereby ads that are not likely to aggravate the consumer pass through the blocker.Adblock Plus has its own "Acceptable Ads Policy" which has critics, internet advertising trade body the IAB is trying to work with the industry to create "LEAN" advertising standards that it hopes everyone will adhere to, and Google is also looking to steer its own acceptable ad standard for the industry.Three is planning on working with a different industry body and publishers on a new set of ad standards.Malleschitz said he couldn't comment on the partner while the negotiations are still ongoing.Three says it isn't breaching net neutrality lawsWe also asked whether regulators might take notice of a mobile carrier deciding which ads are and aren't fit for the web.Then it will decide where to go next.NOW WATCH: An in-wall vacuum makes sweeping so much easierLoading video...
The Three network will block website adverts from appearing on mobile devicesThree will begin testing website advert blocking on its mobile network next month.Three argues that many mobile adverts are irrelevant and intrusive, and rob users of mobile data they have paid for."And our customers are becoming increasingly frustrated by irrelevant and intrusive adverts which use up their data allowance and can invade their privacy by tracking their behaviour without their knowledge of consent."This, Three claims, will result in "more relevant, less intrusive adverts that increase consumer satisfaction."A 24-hour trial will take place during the week beginning 13 June and will help Three tune its algorithms to filter out unwanted adverts, so they do not appear on the customer's screen.Three UK chief executive Tom Malleschitz said: "This is the next step in our journey to make mobile ads better for our customers... adverts frustrate customers, eat up their data allowance and can jeopardise their privacy.
We believe the current mobile advertising model is broken and our customers are becoming increasingly frustrated by irrelevant and intrusive adverts which use up their data allowance and can invade their privacy by tracking their behaviour without their knowledge or consent, the company said in a statement.In research from April 2016, KPMG found that 44 percent of U.K. adults are planning to use an ad-blocker in the next six months.There is also a more immediate, financial interest in blocking ads: Large, media-heavy ads are a drain on your bandwidth and can count toward your bandwidth allowance, eating up your data plans, which is an acute problem for most mobile phone users especially.In the U.S., ad blocking was used by 45 million users in the same period.The carrier is owned by Hutchison Holdings, which also has mobile services in Australia, Austria, Denmark, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Macau, Sri Lanka, Sweden and Vietnam.However, it will also put Three and other carriers that might follow its lead squarely against not just large brands, but the ad tech companies that help brands put their message in front of you.
Three opens trial programme for network-level ad blockingNext month, Three will begin trials of a new feature to block all online ads before they reach the user Ars Technica UK .Foxconn increases robot workforceA Chinese government official has told the South China Morning Post that hardware and component maker Foxconn has at one factory in the Kushan region "reduced employee strength from 110,000 to 50,000 thanks to the introduction of robots" BBC .However, a representative of the company, which is perhaps best known as the contract manufacturer of the iPhone, has denied that long-term job losses have resulted from the move, telling the BBC that "we are applying robotics engineering and other innovative manufacturing technologies to replace repetitive tasks previously done by employees, and through training, also enable our employees to focus on higher value-added elements in the manufacturing process, such as research and development, process control and quality control."This has important implications for models of climate change and global warming, as it was previously thought that modern high levels of sulphuric acid, which forms as a result of environmental reactions with sulphur dioxide emissions, were the key means by which clouds form, meaning that our skies were once less cloudy.After inflation, Nasa astronauts will enter the module for the first time on June 2.Book now for WIRED MoneyWIRED Money showcases the innovative thinkers who are re-imagining the financial sector.
Three has announced that it will hold a 24-hour ad-blocking trial in mid-June, and will soon begin contacting customers to get them to sign up for it.Though plenty of us use ad-blockers on desktop computers, they re far less popular on mobiles, and this move represents the first instance of network-level ad-blocking in the UK.The mobile operator says it will reduce data costs, improve customer privacy and deliver a better mobile experience with its ad-blocker, but insists that it doesn t want to kill off adverts altogether.The current ad model is broken, said Three UK chief marketing officer Tom Malleschitz.Read More: Which UK Network Offers the Cheapest Roaming Charges?It'll be interesting to see how or indeed if Three manages to roll it out properly, as the company faces a long list of legal battles relating to competition rules.
Network operator Three has confirmed it will begin blocking adverts on mobile websites and in apps from next month.For a 24-hour period, at some point during the week of June 13 to 20, the firm said it will restrict ads at a network level.This means anyone who is part of the trial will not see advertisements as they browse the web or use apps on their devices.For the approach to work technically, Three – which has around nine million users in the UK – has partnered with Israeli company Shine.There is no indication yet on the number of customers that will be allowed to take part.At the time, Three said it had decided to use "network-based ad blocking" as it is "more powerful and effective solution" than its customers individually downloading ad blockers.
Three has announced that it will hold a 24-hour ad-blocking trial in mid-June, and will soon begin contacting customers to get them to sign up for it.Though plenty of us use ad-blockers on desktop computers, they re far less popular on mobiles, and this move represents the first instance of network-level ad-blocking in the UK.The mobile operator says it will reduce data costs, improve customer privacy and deliver a better mobile experience with its ad-blocker, but insists that it doesn t want to kill off adverts altogether.The current ad model is broken, said Three UK chief marketing officer Tom Malleschitz.Read More: Which UK Network Offers the Cheapest Roaming Charges?It'll be interesting to see how or indeed if Three manages to roll it out properly, as the company faces a long list of legal battles relating to competition rules.
Mobile operator Three is pushing ahead with plans to block ads on its network in the UK during a one-day trial next month.Sam Barker, an analyst at Juniper Research, said other operators are likely to follow suit.The telco announced the trial earlier this year, having inked a deal with Israeli startup Shine, which produces the network-level blocking tech Three will be using.Three claims the move will "revolutionise" mobile advertising.Earlier this month, the EU vetoed the proposed £10.25bn merger between mobile operators Three and O2.Juniper Research predicts that digital publishers stand to lose more than $27bn £18bn by 2020 due to ad-blocking.
Day-long trial will delight customers but could be bad news for online businessesThree has announced a potentially game-changing stunt that will see it block all mobile advertising across its network for 24 hours.The network says that the trial move will help to revolutionise the mobile advertising experience and remove the amount of annoying adverts that its users encounter every day.The trial will take place during the week commencing June 13, although Three has yet to confirm exactly when.Broken Three Store 1 We believe the current mobile advertising model is broken and our customers are becoming increasingly frustrated by irrelevant and intrusive adverts which use up their data allowance and can invade their privacy by tracking their behaviour without their knowledge or consent, Three, which has 8.8m customers across the UK, said in a statement.Ad blocking has become a controversial area for both businesses and advertisers as more companies rely on these lucrative revenue streams.Three is not the first network to consider such a move, as last November, EE CEO Olaf Swantee revealed that his company was investigating blocking online adverts at a network level.
The company had partnered up with a startup named Shine to remove ads from mobile webpages.Three is planning to have an entire day where they will block approximately 95% of all ads that would be seen on their network.They have announced that their reasoning for pursuing this is threefold of course it is .advertisements count towards customers' mobile data charges, rather than advertisers shouldering the costsome advertisers "extract and exploit" customer informationcustomers do not always receive relevant adverts and have their browsing experience "degraded by excessive, intrusive, unwanted or irrelevant adverts"So what advertisements will be blocked?Nearly everything that they can, it appears.Virtually all advertisements on non-social media sites will be blocked.
Three said it was exploring ad-blocking on its network because:advertisements count towards customers' mobile data charges, rather than advertisers shouldering the costsome advertisers "extract and exploit" customer informationcustomers do not always receive relevant adverts and have their browsing experience "degraded by excessive, intrusive, unwanted or irrelevant adverts"In February, it announced a partnership with ad-blocking start-up Shine, in which Li Ka-shing, the owner of Three's parent company CK Hutchison, is an investor.The mobile network said the technology would block 95% of pop-ups and adverts on websites, but the pre-roll video adverts, sponsored articles and in-feed promotions on social networks such as Twitter and Facebook would not be blocked.'Disagree with Three'Steve Chester from the IAB said encouraging advertisers to produce a "lighter, less invasive ad experience" was preferable to ad-blocking."In the long-term consumers will also lose out, as they'll most likely have to pay for services that are currently free because they're supported by advertising."Many people already choose to block adverts online by downloading browser plug-ins or mobile apps that can strip promotional content off websites.Ad-blocking at a network level could reduce mobile data use by customers, but could also let a mobile service provider decide who can advertise to its customers, or charge fees to "white list" advertisers.
Three has announced that for 24 hours next month it will be blocking adverts at the network level.ThreeThe experiment will be opt-in only and Three customers will be contacted beforehand asking whether or not they would like to take part.The current ad model is broken, it frustrates customers, eats up their data allowance and can jeopardise their privacy.We can only achieve change by working with all stakeholders in the advertising industry – customers, advertising networks and publishers – to create a new form of advertising that is better for all parties.Kagenmi via Getty ImagesAd-blockers have become a controversial approach to dealing with online advertising and some websites have even gone as far as to block users from seeing their content if ad-blockers are enabled.Three on the other hand believes the advert model is broken, citing the fact that 44 per cent of UK adults will at some point install an ad-blocker in the next six months.
Today the company outlined their strategy by announcing that they would offer 500,000 of their customers the opportunity to opt-in to a test of this service, which will happen sometime next month.The first and foremost reason was that "advertisements count towards customers' mobile data charges, rather than advertisers shouldering the cost."The advertisers do, in fact, pay for the data.Every one of Three's customers that opts-in to this program will be costing website owners money, every time they browse the web.You want the content, and with the content come the advertisements.You either have to pay a subscription just to see it, or a large number of people need to donate money directly to the site.
A recent study from PageFair, which provides ad technology that can circumvent blockers, has reinforced just how pervasive the mobile ad blocking universe.More than 20% of the 1.9 billion global mobile phone users have installed some form of ad blocker on their mobile devices.Ad blocking is very popular in emerging APAC markets and less so, currently, in Europe and North America.The report details the various ways users can block ads from ISP-level blocking to in-app providers like AdBlock and AdShaker to browser blocking, like offered as either default or opt-in through Apple's Safari, Opera and Firefox.PageFair found 45 different ad blocking browsers, which is currently the most popular form of ad blocking.And, underscoring the dominant role of APAC in ad blocking, four of the top five ad-blocking browsers are made by Alibaba for the APAC audience.
In August last year, Adobe and PageFair reported that the global number of ad blocking users had grown from 21 million in 2009 to just under 200 million in mid-2015.In other words, the numbers have doubled in about a year.It s less developed in North America and Europe according to the report s findings.PageFair said that it identified 45 different adblocking browsers available for download on iOS and Android.Google s AMP and several other initiatives are attempts to improve ad quality and address mobile user complaints.The report predicts that mobile browser-based blocking is now so mainstream in certain countries that the next billion users, which Facebook is keenly interested in, may be invisible to digital marketers.
A new report claims there are now nearly twice as many people blocking ads on smartphones as there are on desktop.Research from PageFair — a technology company that makes its money by providing ad blocking solutions to publishers — and mobile data company Priori Data estimates there are at least 419 million people blocking ads on smartphones worldwide.PageFair estimated last year that there are 198 million desktop ad blocker users.The most common way of blocking ads on smartphones is through browsers which block ads by default, according to PageFair, which estimates 408 million people used an ad blocking browser in March 2016.That staggeringly-high number equates to 21% of the world's smartphone population having an ad blocking browser installed.Popular ad blocking browsers include Adblock Plus, Brave, and UC Browser — the latter of which appears to have exploded in popularity in Asia.UC Browser is owned by Chinese web giant Alibaba.There are also browsers like Opera and Firefox, which offer users the option of configuring their settings to block ads, but the researchers only included the number of people using browsers that block ads by default to come to its 408 million figure.Mobile ad blocking is driven by users in emerging markets.PageFair claims 36% of smartphone users in Asia-Pacific are blocking ads on the mobile web.Meanwhile, there were only 14 million monthly active users of ad blocking browsers in Europe and North America, according to PageFair.There were fears last year when Apple allowed content blocking apps in its App Store for the first time that the move would lead to a huge spike in mobile web ad blocking.However, those fears appear to be unfounded for now , according to the report.Ad blocking apps on Apple's iOS have only attracted 4.5 million downloads, PageFair says.The company predicts that ad blocking browser usage will continue to grow wherever data costs are high.In the Caribbean, for example, mobile carrier Digicel recently rolled out network-level ad blocking for its 13.6 million customers across 31 markets.In the UK, mobile carrier Three, which has 9 million subscribers, is carrying out a test next month that will see it deploy network-level ad blocking for a group of its customers for one day.PageFair and Priori Data came to their global monthly ad blocking browser number by combining these sources: The estimate of worldwide smartphone users, according to eMarketer; the percentage of mobile browser traffic coming from UC Browser, according to StatCounter; and "the observed relationship between the monthly cumulative average downloads of UC Browser in all of its forms and the monthly cumulative average downloads of all ad blocking browsers across Priori Data's markets."You can read the full report and methodology here.NOW WATCH: This 14-year-old makes up to $1,500 a night eating dinner in front of a webcam in South KoreaLoading video...
That figure is equivalent to 22 percent of the world s 1.9 billion smartphone owners, according to Ireland-based company PageFair, which provides counter ad block solutions to web publishers.PageFair joined forces with mobile app tracking service Priori Data to produce the report, which reveals that just over 400 million people use mobile browsers that block ads by default.These are especially popular in emerging markets across the Asia-Pacific region, where 36 percent of smartphone owners block ads.The figure is much lower in the US and Europe, where there were 14 million monthly active users of ad-blocking browsers."We found the results surprising because in the West we don t often consider what s going on in developing countries," PageFair CEO Sean Blanchfield tells The New York Times.Priori Data chief executive Patrick Kane said that smartphone owners trying to minimize spending on mobile data was the reason behind the popularity of mobile ad blocking in developing markets.
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