Come January 20th, the White House will have a new occupant.As Senator and then as Vice President during the Obama years, President-elect Joe Biden championed closer ties with India.He was one of the early proponents of the 2008 nuclear deal, which fundamentally altered relations between the two democracies.In 2006, he said, “My dream is that in 2020, the two closest nations in the world will be India and the United States.”As the world’s largest democracy, the third-largest Asian economy, and a potential bulwark against China, India is widely seen as enjoying bipartisan consensus in Washington.But that’s not to say that the dynamic between the two countries will remain entirely unchanged under the incoming Biden administration.There are places where Biden’s approach is expected to differ from Trump’s - and not all the changes might work in India’s interests.Head to this link for a deep-dive into what lies ahead for India-US ties: https://transfin.in/how-will-the-joe-biden-presidency-impact-india-us-relations
This dispersal works to your company’s advantage because talent and intelligence are equally distributed throughout the world – but opportunity isn’t.In Silicon Valley, you have the big tech companies fish from essentially the same pond or bay.By making the company distributed, you can fish from the entire ocean.Instead of hiring someone who grew up in Hong Kong but now lives in San Francisco, you can gain someone who lives, works, wakes up, and goes to sleep wherever they are in the world.They bring a different understanding of that culture, and a different lived experience day to day.‘Distributed’ changes the workplaceWith the decision to go distributed, there’s a desire to give people autonomy over how they work.This allows people to:Make their own schedule (unless it’s a role where specific hours are important),Have their own corner office.Choose the food they want to eat.Decide when there’s music and when there’s silence.Change the room’s temperature.Choose to save the time they’d spend commuting every day and put it into other things that are more important to them.How to be more distributedA distributed workforce is ideal for a technology business, but would it work for everyone else?If you already have an office, there are a few things you can do to build distributed capability:Document everythingIn an office, it’s easy to decide in the moment (e.g.It allows people in different time zones to interact.It’s also great to think about as an organisation evolves, as people leave and come aboard.Move communications onlineAlong those same lines, try to have as much communication as possible online.
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Facebook, Google and Amazon all reported significant revenue growth during, and partly because of, the pandemic. Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.
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Apple and Google have a complicated relationship.On one hand, the Silicon Valley giants are fiercely competitive.Steve Jobs once vowed “thermonuclear war” against Google’s attempts to build an iPhone rival.And Tim Cook has repeatedly accused Google of engaging in “surveillance” of consumers.But on the other hand, the two companies are joined at the hip over one of the fundamental areas of the internet - search.The Apple-Google deal that dictates this unique relationship is one that is central to the way the tech world functions today.It’s a deal that has sparked one of the largest antitrust lawsuits in recent memory.And it's a deal that may be ending soon.Because Apple may be finally building a search engine of its own to compete with Google.Click link to read more: https://transfin.in/apple-might-roll-out-its-own-search-engine-in-direct-challenge-to-google-search
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Marketers learned a long time ago they can’t have their cake and it too when it comes to openly fighting these platforms while directly funding them. The post ‘There’s a plausible deniability aspect’: Why marketers are sitting on the sidelines in the regulatory fights against big tech appeared first on Digiday.
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Photo by Vjeran Pavic / The Verge This week on The Verge’s flagship podcast, The Vergecast: Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) yells at Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, gadget makers are going to QVC, and it is weird phone season once again. Hosts Nilay Patel and Dieter Bohn talk to Verge senior reporter Adi Robertson about the latest congressional hearing with the big tech CEOs — this time about Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Google CEO Sundar Pichai, and Dorsey attended the hearing over video in front of the Senate Commerce Committee, and Adi explains what everyone had to say. In the second half of the show, Ashley Carman stops by to talk about the newest episode of her video series In the Making, which is about how live shopping channels like... Continue reading…
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Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge Facebook supports rewriting Section 230, and it’s starting to lay out the changes it wants. That’s the big takeaway from a nearly four-hour grilling of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai, and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey. The point was quickly lost in a pre-election political scuffle — but in the coming months, it’ll be one of the most important things to watch. Yesterday, the Senate Commerce Committee held a hearing about Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, a foundational internet law. The event was supposed to examine whether Section 230 protections — which protect web services and sites of all sizes — “enable Big Tech Bad behavior.” Witnesses came prepared with arguments against that premise. Dorsey cited... Continue reading…
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Here are the top media and advertising stories from Business Insider for October 29.
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Platforms like Facebook and Google are sharing their plans to pause political ads around Election Day. That’s won’t stop all paid campaigning.
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The CEOs will appear before the Senate Wednesday as tensions rise between Big Tech and Republicans, who claim tech is biased against the right.
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"People assume Congress is so incompetent and so inept and Big Tech companies are so smart they'll figure out how to stop them," said Tusk.
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Photo by Mandel Ngan-Pool/Getty Images Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey will testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on November 17th. “The hearing will focus on the platforms’ censorship and suppression of New York Post articles and provide a valuable opportunity to review the companies’ handling of the 2020 election,” according to a press release. Last week, the New York Post published a story claiming that Hunter Biden introduced his father, Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden, to an executive at the Ukrainian energy company Burisma. Reporters at other publications disputed the allegations in the story, and Facebook and Twitter both took action to restrict the story from spreading. Facebook reduced the story’s reach and said it was... Continue reading…
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"I do not think there are hundreds of Googles, Microsofts, and Amazons in those companies, so I think that is where the froth is."
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The year isn’t over, not for more than two months. But it sure feels like 2020 should end soon, seeing as how one pandemic-stressed, politics-inflamed day bleeds into the next.Nevertheless, it might be healthy to start putting 2020 behind us. It’s been a disruptive year in high tech, as in every other industry, but it’s also been a highly public proving ground for cloud, streaming, artificial intelligence, and other pillars of 21st century civilization. [ Also on InfoWorld: How data analysis, AI, and IoT will shape the post-pandemic ‘new normal’ ] Tech has been the economy’s mainstay during the pandemic As we squint past the upcoming US presidential election into the new year, the following trends will shape the technology landscape for the rest of this decade, regardless of who occupies the White House on January 20.To read this article in full, please click here
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Piling on big tech companies is the fashion of the day, but don't expect the US government to break up Google.
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Scott and Iain show their selfless devotion to podcasting by donning their face masks and trekking into the studio once more. They start by looking at a couple of stories illustrating the increasing conflict between giant US tech companies and the state. Sticking with big tech, they move on to compare notes on the latest Apple iPhone launch and conclude by discussing Nokia’s decision to move its tech infrastructure into the Google public cloud.
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Big Tech is in for a wild ride as Southeast Asia governments look to tighten regulations as well as an electric motorbike startup gets money to expand to Indonesia.
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Southeast Asia is a haven for Big Tech in these troubled geopolitical times, but players should brace themselves for greater regulatory scrutiny.
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Or as they put it: ‘Embed the safety of the public in system designs … facilitating the investigation and prosecution of offences’ The nations of the Five Eyes security alliance – Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the USA and the UK – plus Japan and India, have called on technology companies to design their products so they offer access to encrypted messages and content.…
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Brussels broadens search for extra powers to curb power of digital platforms
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