Neither flash nor html5 is supported!There s only one way for Black Lives Matter activist DeRay Mckesson to stop the unending stream of death threats, racial slurs and other vitriol trolls bombard him with on social media.One at a time, Mckesson said Wednesday at tech blog Recode s annual conference.Mckesson was speaking with Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey and Recode s Peter Kafka as he described receiving the insulting and threatening messages.That s not fun to experience, said Mckesson, who gained prominence during 2014 protests in Ferguson, Missouri and launched an unsuccessful campaign for mayor of Baltimore this year.Still, Mckesson maintains a prolific output on Twitter, where has 367,000 followers.
That figure soundly beats Bloomberg's estimate of Twitter's 136 million daily users derived from the service's publicly announced 310 monthly active users and Twitter's announced estimates of how many of those use the service on a daily basis .In recent years, Snapchat's basic functionality—of auto-deleting messages and posts while connecting friends to photo and video feeds—has expanded.Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey appeared at this week's Code Conference on Wednesday, wearing a T-shirt emblazoned in the phrase " keepwoke."He was asked about burgeoning services like Snapchat—particularly in the context of viral social movements such as Black Lives Matter."It's recognizing that we're going to press buttons less and gesture more."The executive said this setup paled compared to Snapchat's interface.
First, let me make clear we have zero tolerance for any amount of racism or discrimination on our platform, and we take swift action whenever we hear about anything, co-founder and CEO Brian Chesky said during Airbnb s annual OpenAir conference in San Francisco.Airbnb also used the stage time to announce three new product features intended to make it easier for groups of travelers and people traveling for business to book rooms on the platform.A study by Harvard Business School earlier this year found travelers with African-American-sounding names were 16 percent less likely to be given a room than travelers with white-sounding names.King said Airbnb is conducting a review of its platform to assess what needs to change, which will conclude in September.Conference attendees also heard a panel discussion on building an inclusive company, which featured King, gender discrimination activist Ellen Pao and Slack Director of Engineering Leslie Miley.Miley said the CEO has to be the one to set the tone, and take a hard-line stance that makes it clear discrimination will be dealt with swiftly and with certainty.For example, he suggested how Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg should have responded to an employee famously crossing out a black lives matter slogan on a wall where employees traditionally scrawl various messages, and replacing it with all lives matter.Airbnb Vice President of Engineering Mike Curtis also announced new product features Wednesday.We think it s going to have a huge impact, Curis said of the new business booking feature, in terms of the experience and the number of companies that will choose Airbnb as the best way to travel for business.Photo: Airbnb co-founder and CEO Brian Chesky addresses the crowd during Airbnb s annual OpenAir conference in San Francisco on Wednesday.Marisa Kendall/Mercury News Tags: Airbnb, discrimination, home-sharing, racism
When Facebook launched a new system in January to help news outlets and other groups target posts to particular audiences, a representative of the New York Times said it had the potential to kindle vibrant discussions within niche Facebook communities that might otherwise get lost amid the social network s 1.6 billion users.
Two-factor authentication doesn't help if someone has already stolen your phone number.Those tweets have since been deleted and Twitter has restored account access to Mckesson.Even though Mckesson said in a tweet that he has two-factor authentication 2FA enabled on all his accounts, Twitter included, once someone has your password and can receive texts sent to your phone number, they ve obtained two factors: someone you know your password and something you have your phone .By calling @verizon and successfully changing my phone's SIM, the hacker bypassed two-factor verification which I have on all accounts.T-Mobile requires that you call customer service or visit one of its retail stores.That works as long as it s assumed that the phone itself, a physical item, has to be stolen, not the phone number, which is effectively an end point handled by the public switched telephone network s call routing system.
Two-factor authentication doesn't help if someone has already stolen your phone number.Those tweets have since been deleted and Twitter has restored account access to Mckesson.Even though Mckesson said in a tweet that he has two-factor authentication 2FA enabled on all his accounts, Twitter included, once someone has your password and can receive texts sent to your phone number, they ve obtained two factors: someone you know your password and something you have your phone .By calling @verizon and successfully changing my phone's SIM, the hacker bypassed two-factor verification which I have on all accounts.T-Mobile requires that you call customer service or visit one of its retail stores.That works as long as it s assumed that the phone itself, a physical item, has to be stolen, not the phone number, which is effectively an end point handled by the public switched telephone network s call routing system.
Jason Howie/Flickr Black Lives Matter activist and Baltimore mayoral candidate Deray McKesson had his Twitter account hacked on Friday using a method that takes just minutes to carry out.The hacker got the account verification texts," McKesson tweeted.Before McKesson regained access to his Twitter account, the hacker tweeted an endorsement of Donald Trump for president, and a tweet announcing that "I'm not actually black."For example, Verizon Wireless' website asks for a customer's 10-digit phone number and billing zip code.Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.More from Tech Insider:Amazon is preparing a music streaming service to take on Spotify and AppleThe 12 worst video game movies of all timeThe actor behind Jon Snow is the villain in one of the year's biggest video gamesA hacker explains why you shouldn't believe North Korea was behind the massive Sony hackEverything we expect PlayStation to announce at E3NOW WATCH: Hackers showed us how easy it is to secretly clone a security badgeLoading video...
In fact, he seemed to take every precaution with his Twitter account, setting up two-factor authentication—as we have advocated many times—so that anyone attempting to get into his Twitter account would have to have not only his password but a second code texted to his cell phone.It s surprisingly simple for hackers to gain access to your entire mobile account.Just this week, the Federal Trade Commission s top technologist Lorrie Cranor recounted to WIRED how hackers were able to hijack her account to buy new phones under her name, deactiving her family s phones and sending her scrambling to lock down her account.As McKesson explained on Twitter today after he regained control of his account, that s exactly what seemed to have happened to him, too.Once the hackers had the keys to McKesson s cellular account, they were able to reroute his text messages to a different SIM card, get his two-factor code, and voila, they were in his Twitter, and even his email accounts.That way, even if the hackers have an easy-to-find bit of personal info that could enable them to access your accounts—the last four digits of your social security number, for example—there s another level of protection between them and the whole world that your mobile account opens up.
This week, the company announced that it s switching out the annoying and hackable six digit code with a simple yes or no button.This is a great move.Furthermore, Google s update makes two-step verification less of a pain in the ass.In scenarios where you receive a text with a verification code on your phone which is often the default setting , a hellbent hacker could socially engineer your carrier to forward text messages to their phone by calling the customer service and pretending to be you.So after the hacker has tricked some poor customer service rep, they can log in with your username and password, probably stolen from some leaked database, and then get you two-step verification code sent to their phone and boom, they re in.For example, Black Lives Matter activist DeRay McKesson had his Twitter account stolen this month because a hacker used a similar method to gain access to his account.
This week, the company announced that it s switching out the annoying and hackable six-digit code with a simple yes or no button.This is a great move.Furthermore, Google s update makes two-step verification less of a pain.In scenarios where you receive a text with a verification code on your phone which is often the default setting , a hellbent hacker could socially engineer your carrier to forward text messages to their phone by calling the customer service and pretending to be you.So after the hacker has tricked some poor customer service rep, they can log in with your username and password, probably stolen from some leaked database, and then get you two-step verification code sent to their phone and boom, they re in.For example, Black Lives Matter activist DeRay McKesson had his Twitter account stolen this month because a hacker used a similar method to gain access to his account.
From BlackLivesMatter to rainbow-colored lights on the White House to Jean Julien's "Peace for Paris" sketch, 2015 showed us the power of marketing beyond consumerism.The key is to build personal relationships with customers.Instead of focusing on the goals they set and then seeing how willing customers are to buy into them, successful brands will focus on discovering an individual customer's goals and helping her achieve them.That discovery will be aided by the exploding supply of personal data.One in four own a fitness tracker, and among those who don t, 38 percent plan to buy one in the next six months.Tailored data helps create the most appealing marketing campaigns.
But a two-factor setup—which for most users requires a temporary code generated on, or sent to, your phone in addition to a password—isn t an invincibility spell.The last few months have demonstrated that SMS text messages are often the weakest link in two-step logins: Attacks on political activists in Iran, Russia, and even here in the US have shown that determined hackers can sometimes hijack the SMS messages meant to keep you safe.Earlier this month, Black Lives Matter activist DeRay McKesson found that his Twitter account was hacked to tweet pro-Donald Trump messages, despite having two-factor authentication in place.Adding a layer of SMS-based verification to your login process is certainly better than relying on a password alone.Then that string of characters is hashed again, and results are hashed again, repeating every few seconds.And only a few digits of those characters are displayed as the login code, so that no one who glances at a user s phone can start their own hash chain.
A new Pew Research study released Monday shows that black and white America have profoundly different views on race and inequality.The study, which involved 3,769 adults 1,799 whites, 1,004 blacks and 654 Hispanics and was conducted between Feb. 29 through May 8, says that the results show how black and white America are worlds apart, and when it comes to achieving equality, black respondents see it as an elusive goal.Most black people believe the country should do more to achieve racial equality, while less than half of white people say enough has already been done.When compared to whites, 40 percent are hopeful that the country will continue to work towards giving black people equal rights as whites, while 38 percent believe that the country has already made the necessary changes.Black and white America s assessment of President Barack Obama s impact on race relations widely differ.But the most glaring difference is revealed in results that show 32 percent of white people, mostly Republican, who say Obama has made race relations worse, which stands in stark contrast to the nine percent of black people who feel the same.
Diamond Reynolds was begging her boyfriend, Philando Castile, after a police officer fatally shot him following a traffic stop in Falcon Heights, Minnesota, last night.But the desperate request also applied to the nearly 3 million people who eventually tuned in to Reynolds Facebook Live stream of the moments after ordeal.Victims of police shootings have no authorities to call, no higher-ups to summon.In recent years, social media has changed that dynamic, giving bystanders a way to document these all-too-frequent acts of violence.It s what happened in the cases of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri and Walter Scott in Charleston, South Carolina.Just this week, it s what happened in the case of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.
Practicing good habits online will help keep your mental and emotional health up to par when dealing with race-related trauma.We especially feel it when an unarmed black man is killed by a cop, a black woman dies in police custody or an officer walks free of charges after killing a black child in the park.In America, our skin color is a daily reminder that we, and our loved ones, may not make it to tomorrow.One of the most recent reminders of this seemingly unescapable fate is Alton Sterling, who was shot several times in the chest and back by Baton Rouge police Tuesday outside of a convenience store where he frequently sold CDs.Before the black community could even fully process Sterling s death, Philando Castile was gunned down Wednesday after he was pulled over for a busted tail light.Sterling and Castile s killings weren t isolated incidents.
When a police robot killed suspect Micah Johnson in Dallas early Friday morning, it was likely an unprecedented event.But according to Steve Ijames, recently retired assistant chief of police in Springfield, Missouri, and a recognized expert in SWAT tactics, it was not a watershed moment portending a weaponized robotic future.The standoff after the police massacre at a Black Lives Matter protest was unique for a number of reasons, he says.The police department hasn t elaborated on the device the bomb-defusing robot used or how exactly it killed the suspect, nor on the circumstances that led to the decision.Although details about the incident are still scarce, Dallas Police Chief David Brown said this morning that his department had brought in the robot only after negotiations broke down with the suspect.Since the Dallas police chief mentioned an explosive device killed the suspect, Ijames says that his years of SWAT experience leads him to believe that the suspect was barricaded behind or in something the police needed to breach.
Jay Z says spiritual is a work in progress that he never quite had the time to finish, but the track was released anyway late on Thursday night for good reason.The song, which marks the first new single the famed rapper has released in years, discusses what it s like to be a black person in America right now.It s particularly poignant in light of the recent killings of Alton Sterling, Philando Castile and, sadly, many more.The release also comes on the same evening as the horrific shooting of 11 police officers who took sniper fire while guarding a Black Lives Matter protest in Dallas, TX.DON T MISS: As iPhone sales stall, Galaxy S7 is even hotter than Samsung expectedJay Z released the following text alongside the new single:
Your browser does not support HTML5 videoPlayPausePlayPauseMute0%00:00 / 00:00FullscreenSmallscreen Close Embed Feed Black Lives Matter: African-Americans killed by police in 2016 IBTimes UKA Facebook video showing the aftermath of the shooting of 32-year-old Philando Castile during a routine traffic stop in Minnesota on 6 June may have been removed by the city police department and not due to a 'technical glitch', multiple sources have told The Register.The footage was recorded on Facebook Live by Castile's fiancée, Diamond Reynolds, who used her smartphone to document her boyfriend's final moments after he was shot by police while reportedly reaching for his ID in his wallet.After the video mysteriously disappeared from the platform for over an hour after going viral, a spokesperson blamed it on a bug, but did not elaborate further."It was down to a technical glitch and restored as soon as we were able to investigate."However, The Register reports that multiple sources have now claimed it was the Minnesota police department took control of the phone and changed the settings to remove it from public view.
The nation is reeling after gunmen shot and killed five police officers and injured seven more in Dallas on Thursday during a Black Lives Matter protest.The protest arose from this week s police killings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile.People across the country have rallied in support of the officers and their families.Here s how you can help.Support Family Members Of Police Officers Who Were KilledCrowdfunding site Razoo has started a fundraiser to support the Dallas police victims and their families in the aftermath of Thursday s shootings.
Early into the investigations behind the shooting of Philando Castile, a black man who was killed by a Minnesota cop during a traffic stop, many speculated that the responsible policeman was Asian American.In the viral video shot by Castile s girlfriend Diamond Reynolds, she described the cop as Asian male.Minnesota Department of Public Safety later identified him as Jeronimo Yanez, though did not specify his ethnicity.Fearing the parallels to how the Chinese American community rallied behind New York cop Peter Liang who shot and killed an innocent black man last year, writer and ethnographer Christina Xu decided to crowdsource an open letter to help explain to her older generations why Black Lives Matter matters.Asian-Americans who support BLM, we need to get ahead of our community organizing another pro-Liang rally.— Christina Xu @xuhulk July 7, 2016
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