Thomas claims Twitter's "right to cut off speech" may be First Amendment problem.
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Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas flaunted a dangerous ignorance regarding matters digital in an opinion published today. In attempting to explain the legal difficulties of social media platforms, particularly those arising from Twitter’s ban of Trump, he makes an ill-informed, bordering on bizarre, argument as to why such companies may need their First Amendment rights […]
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The highest court in the US finds that Google's use of Java SE code constituted "fair use of that material."
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Two men named Jared Kushner reveal the highs and lows of being confused for the former senior presidential advisor.
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In a 9-0 decision authored by Justice Sonia Sotomayor, the Supreme Court barred a proposed lawsuit against Facebook over automated text messages.
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And the latest on the deadly shootings in Atlanta.
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Whitehouse called for "congressional oversight to understand how, why, and at whose behest and with whose knowledge or connivance, this was done."
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Charlotte Bennett's lawyer Debra Katz said she provided "detailed information about the sexually hostile work environment" Cuomo fostered.
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Former Cuomo aide Charlotte Bennett, 25, says the governor asked her inappropriate questions about her sex life and dating preferences.
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Facebook's employees wanted the ban to extend to posts supporting or praising Alex Jones, but Zuckerberg vetoed that part of it.
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New Justice Amy Coney Barrett took a more middle-ground position and did not allow churches to have all restrictions lifted.
With Biden and Harris in the White House and Democrats having control of both chambers of Congress, pro-choice advocates are hopeful about the future.
"At this hour, my friends, democracy has prevailed," President Joe Biden says in his inaugural address after being sworn-in.
On a Daily Beast podcast, Hogue discussed Roe v. Wade, which legalized abortion in the US and afforded women a constitutional right to the procedure.
Trump called Biden a "Fake President" and said the US election "was the election of a third world country," alleging millions of "corrupt" votes.
Amy Coney Barrett's elevation to the Supreme Court means that the more conservative justices can out-vote its occasional swing justice.
Ballots have a higher on-time delivery rate than regular first-class mail, with an inbound on-time delivery rate of just over 95%.
The results of elections are never finalized on election night and what Trump desires would actually potentially disenfranchise his own supporters.
While it's unlikely for this election to be decided in the Supreme Court, the Justices' opinions signaled how they may rule on future consequential cases.
Senate Republicans voted Monday night to confirm Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court, tilting the balance of the court to a 6-3 conservative majority for years to come and handing US President Donald Trump a victory barely a week before the election.Every Republican but one, senator Susan Collins of Maine, voted to confirm Barrett. Every Democrat voted no. The final tally was 52 to 48.The White House planned to hold a large outdoor event later Monday night to celebrate Barrett’s confirmation, despite a previous White House event for Barrett triggering a coronavirus outbreak among attendees. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas reportedly will administer the constitutional oath to Barrett at the event.Barrett’s confirmation ends a weekslong dash by Republicans to put her on the court before the November 3 election, in the event Trump loses reelection and leaves a potential President Joe Biden better positioned to fill the seat in 2021. Barrett, 48, will fill the seat left vacant by Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died in September.Democrats protested the rushed process, calling it a “sham” and boycotting Barrett’s vote out of the Judiciary Committee. They criticised Republicans for the hypocrisy of filling a Supreme Court seat in a presidential election year after they denied President Barack Obama the ability to do so. They warned that Barrett is a threat to the Affordable Care Act and highlighted her record of hostility to the health care law, women’s reproductive rights and LGBTQ rights. But they never had the votes to stop her confirmation.Ahead of the vote, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Democrats’ complaints about the process were unfounded.“You can’t win ’em all,” McConnell said on the Senate floor. “Elections have consequences.”“What this administration and this Republican Senate has done is exercise a power that was given to us by the American people in a manner that is entirely within the rules of the Senate and the Constitution of the United States,” he said.But Minority Leader Chuck Schumer called Monday’s vote “one of the darkest days” in the history of the 231 years of the Senate, and said Republicans will regret their power grab in the long haul.“I want to be very clear with my Republican colleagues: You may win this vote, and Amy Coney Barrett may become the next associate justice of the Supreme Court, but you will never, never get your credibility back,” Schumer said. “The next time the American people give Democrats a majority in this chamber, you will have forfeited the right to tell us how to run that majority.”Barrett, a conservative US appeals court judge, dodged even the most basic questions in her confirmation hearing. She refused to say if climate change is real (it is), and wouldn’t say if it is illegal to vote twice in a presidential election (it is).Barrett is Trump’s third Supreme Court justice, after Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh. All three are members of the Federalist Society, a conservative legal organisation through which Trump has outsourced his selection of Supreme Court justices and nearly all of his 53 appeals court judges. The Federalist Society is part of a vast and secretive $250 million network of groups promoting conservative judges and causes. During Barrett’s confirmation hearing this month, senator Sheldon Whitehouse connected the dots between the conservative dark money groups and Barrett’s nomination, saying her confirmation is the grand prize for big donors hoping for favourable court rulings on the issues they care about: among them, weakening or doing away with the Affordable Care Act, abortion rights and marriage equality.“Two hundred and fifty million dollars is a lot of money to spend if you’re not getting anything for it,” he said as Barrett sat feet away. “So that raises the question, ‘What are they getting for it?’”Related... A Guide To US Election Night. Listen To Running Mate, Our American Politics Podcast For Brits What Will The US Election Mean For The UK? Listen To Running Mate, Our American Politics Podcast For Brits The Sexism At The Heart Of American Politics. Listen To Running Mate, Our US Election Podcast For Brits
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