Apple Inc. is said to be considering a return to Australian bonds following its record offering last year, taking advantage of a market that on Wednesday welcomed a A$1 billion $726 million debut transaction from drinks producer Coca-Cola Co.The iPhone maker has hired Australia & New Zealand Banking Group Ltd., Deutsche Bank AG and Goldman Sachs Group Inc. for a potential deal in the Australian currency, according to two people familiar with the matter who asked not to be identified because they re not authorized to speak publicly.It would be launched in the near future, subject to market conditions, they said.The computing giant last year issued A$2.25 billion of notes in the largest-ever transaction Down Under by a company outside the financial-services industry, selling a combination of four-year and seven-year securities.The Coke offering is the biggest non-financial corporate deal since then and was snapped up by Australian bond investors who have been largely starved of such deals in 2016.The world s largest soft drink manufacturer sold A$450 million of four-year notes at a yield of 0.67 percentage point more than the swap rate and A$550 million of eight-year debentures at a 1.05 percentage point spread.That deal was managed by ANZ, Deutsche Bank and Royal Bank of Canada.While total issuance in the Australian bond market has increased 4 percent compared with the same point last year, sales have been dominated by banks, other financial firms and government-related entities, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.Hyundai Motor Co., Korea National Oil Corp. and Port of Brisbane are among the few non-bank companies to have raised funds in the market this year.Apple s foray into Australia is part of a strategy that s seen the Cupertino, California-based firm expand its borrowings in currencies from euros and yen to pounds and Swiss francs.Its first offering in the east Asian country has a planned volume of $800 million to $1.2 billion and is being marketed at a yield of about 4.2 percent, the people said.Carolyn Wu, a Beijing-based spokeswoman for Apple, declined to comment on potential bond issues by the company.
Apple Inc. is looking to build on its record Australian dollar bond sale from last year with a new two-part note offering that s expected to price this week.The iPhone maker is offering senior unsecured fixed-rate notes due in June 2020 at a yield premium of about 0.85 percentage point more than the swap rate, according to people familiar with the matter who asked not to be identified because they re not authorized to speak publicly.A sale would be the latest in a series of non-U.S. transactions by the Cupertino, California-based company over the past two years as it expanded into a range of currencies including the euro, yen and Swiss franc.The proceeds from the new Aussie dollar deal may be used for a variety of general corporate purposes, including stock buybacks and dividend payments, the people familiar with the transaction said.Apple last year issued A$2.25 billion $1.6 billion of notes in the largest-ever transaction Down Under by a company outside the financial-services industry, selling a combination of four-year and seven-year securities.Its offering this week follows a A$1 billion debut placement from beverage giant Coca-Cola Co., the largest such deal so far this year.The offerings follow a dearth of new corporate bonds in Australia outside the financial services sector this year.Hyundai Motor Co., Korea National Oil Corp. and Port of Brisbane are among the few non-bank companies to have raised funds in the market in 2016 before this week.The Australian transaction is expected to price on Friday morning Sydney time and is being managed by Australia & New Zealand Banking Group Ltd., Deutsche Bank AG and Goldman Sachs Group Inc., the people familiar said.Apple is also planning to sell 30-year U.S. currency-denominated bonds in Taiwan, according to people familiar with the matter.Its first offering in the East Asian country has a planned volume of $800 million to $1.2 billion and is being marketed at a yield of about 4.2 percent, the people said.
The Amazon Web Services AWS "power event" AP-SOUTHEAST-2 Region was almost certainly caused by a massive storm system that ran from Brisbane to the NSW South Coast, leading to a weekend of widespread flooding, blocked road and coastal erosion.Wild weather in Sydney causing power issues https://t.co/ep0Z9bHFPp apologies for any disruption.— gkachel @gkachel June 5, 2016AWS EC2 in Sydney was in such bad shape you couldn't even post a support ticket...— geirmagnusson @geirmagnusson June 5, 2016Now my AWS instance which are still having issues won t respond to stop/start— Rachael @halfwrittentale June 5, 2016About now we hope AWS finally starts thinking about running an AZ in Australia outside of Sydney— Dawnstar Australis @dawnstarau June 5, 2016There was a bit of what's going on?discussion on the Australian Network Operators Group's mailing list AusNOG , which drew this thundering warning for media not to report list chatter that is posted in plain sight The Register presumes is in response to a previous Vulture South story that drew from Ausnog posts .AWS still hadn't completely recovered at 7:00PM, Sydney time, on Sunday night, if Twitter posts were anything to go by.Amazon Sydney EC2 still down, sorry folks AWS— FlexiTime @FlexiTimeTeam June 5, 2016The water will drain away, eventually.
These conferences, or "cons", are booming and showcase security skills that rival the best the global security industry can offer.After an arguable decade of hiatus, the cheap grassroots cons have spread out to cover almost all Australian states.The popular pair have a focus on encouraging new blood into the security sector at large, and more specifically into the conference circuit to consume and present new research.They even printed and successfully demonstrated the barcodes printed on teeshirts.The Perth confab was fired up to bridge the 4000 kilometre void between Perth and Australia's big east coast cities.Co-founder Wade Alcorn says the concept was found at the bottom of a beer glass in a Brisbane pub.
The decision comes after the pathetic failure of the televised leaders' debate which, at the end of the broadcast, was being watched by around 0.01 Australians per square kilometre.Malcolm Turnbull says he expects first online debate to be held next week after discussion with Facebook & https://t.co/8dn6VZi3kK ausvotes— Political Alert @political alert June 7, 2016PM Malcolm Turnbull says aim of an online forum is to have a leadership debate "in the media of our time" ausvotes— Political Alert @political alert June 7, 2016The decision to turn to an online debate hosted by Facebook – instead, we should add, of the live debate on offer for tomorrow in Brisbane – might spare the PM from the ignominy of turning up for a TV show nobody watches.At least Facebook is unlikely to score many more users or carriers for its Datr cookie**, as Australia is already pretty much saturated with users.Brace, also, for ugly outbreaks of hate speech: so vile was one recent comment made on Facebook to an aboriginal senator that the author was charged.Since this article first appeared, opposition leader Bill Shorten has said he's sticking with the Sky TV forum on offer tomorrow, and will front the cameras in Brisbane with or without Turnbull.Bootnotes * The worm – Practically the only feature of interest in any televised leader debate in Australia's history, as it showed live aggregated live audience sentiment during pat leaders' debates.
There is an emotional connection to different colors: blue is soothing and red is powerful, for example.It had as its aim the antithesis of what is our usual objective, said researcher Victoria Parr, in an interview with Australia s Brisbane Times.The effect tends to be particularly noticeable in Michael Bay action films, although he is hardly the only offender.Or will it become the new vogue, embraced first by hipster smokers, but later celebrated by all those who would see the dreary color flown high as a banner of their resistance to healthy choices?If art history is any indicator, it may have already been a much more popular color — and far less ugly — than we consider it now.Hyperallergic has an interesting read on how some of the greatest works of art, including Leonardo da Vinci s Mona Lisa, were created with close relatives of Pantone 448 C.So beauty, it would seem, is still in the eye of the beholder.
If your wallet is too heavy by AU$10,000 or so, relax: Australian doctors can relieve your pain with a robot surgeon.This paper in the Medical Journal of Australia enumerates the various ways in which patients can get overcharged for cancer treatment.But the standout, from Vulture South's point of view, was in this discussion of the research in The Brisbane Times.Robotic surgery for prostate cancer, the Cancer Council of Australia says, can rack up as much as AU$30,000 in out-of-pocket expenses: in other words, surgeons are talking people into a treatment that's not covered by Medicare and inadequately covered by private health insurance, so they can roll out the flashy robot.The Cancer Council notes that there's no evidence the robot procedures have better patient outcomes.Private surgeons are pulling out other tricks to get into patients' wallets, in particular telling them they'll suffer long waiting times for cancer surgery in public hospitals.
Your browser does not support HTML5 videoPlayPausePlayPauseMute0%00:00 / 00:00FullscreenSmallscreen Close Embed Feed Teenagers armed with sword and machete rob off licence in south London IBTimes UKA teenage girl has been charged with computer hacking, misuse, three counts of assault, assault occasioning actual bodily harm and falsely stating a bomb was present, over an alleged bomb hoax in northern Queensland, Australia.The adolescent attacker is now in police custody and will be legally dealt with under the Youth Justice Act, the Brisbane Times reported."Police would like to remind the public that making a bomb threat is a very serious offence and those convicted could face up to five years imprisonment," said a spokesperson for the local police, the Daily Mail reported.It is still uncertain as to why the girl made such drastic threats and how she managed to get her hands on the schools' systems.It is also unclear whether the hacking charges brought against the girl indicate any substantial loss or security breach sustained by the school.IBTimes UK has reached out to the Cairns State High School for comment and is yet to hear back.
Uber s Brisbane taxi app.The ride-sharing business has launched UberXL which offers vehicles seating up to six people Photograph: Dan Peled/AAPUber has thumbed its nose at the Queensland government s crackdown on illegal ride-sharing businesses by launching a service in direct opposition to maxi-cabs.In Victoria, Uber could be legalised by the end of the year after the government agreed to work on new laws with the Sex party.The ride-sharing service has been operating there since January 2013, but has been in legal limbo.The Sex party MP Fiona Patten proposed new laws to regulate Uber but has agreed to put her bill on hold while the government figures out how to make them work.Ride-sharing drivers will be required to undergo police and working-with-children checks and their vehicles will be inspected for roadworthiness every six months.
Former Miss Bikini World contestant Renee Eaves won previously a case against a police officer for unlawful arrest in which allegations of near stalking and persistent traffic stops surfaced.Police would ordinarily access such a file less than 50 times over that period, Eaves alleges.A traffic stop in 2004 triggered harassment from one Constable who stopped her up to 20 times in the ensuing two years, she says.A second incident involves a 47 year-old serving police sergeant who was charged with three counts of hacking, three counts of misconduct in public office, and unlawfully accessing the QPrime database.The unnamed officer will appear in the Brisbane Magistrates Court 18 July.Three police in the state have been charged with misconduct offences, for unlawfully accessing QPrime in March and May, including one who tapped the database to research people he met in online dating.
A battle over government, religion, and Star Wars is brewing in Australia.The country will hold their national census on August 9th and a group of people is begging their fellow citizens to not put Jedi down as their religion.Here s the problem: On the 2011 census it takes places every five years 64,390 Australians put Jedi down as their religion, an increase of from 58,053 on the 2006 census, according to The Brisbane Times.Numbers like that put Jedi right behind Sikh on the list of religions in the country.It seems unlikely that all these people truly believe themselves to be actual Jedi, and most of them make the claim as a harmless way to declare their Star Wars fandom and give the government the middle finger at the same time.However, a group called the Atheist Foundation of Australia is leading a campaign to get people to stop making this joke.
A battle over government, religion, and Star Wars is brewing in Australia.The country will hold their national census on August 9 and a group of people is begging their fellow citizens to not put Jedi down as their religion.Here s the problem: On the 2011 census it takes places every five years 64,390 Australians put Jedi down as their religion, an increase of from 58,053 on the 2006 census, according to The Brisbane Times.Numbers like that put Jedi right behind Sikh on the list of religions in the country.It seems unlikely that all these people truly believe themselves to be actual Jedi, and most of them make the claim as a harmless way to declare their Star Wars fandom and give the government the middle finger at the same time.However, a group called the Atheist Foundation of Australia is leading a campaign to get people to stop making this joke.
These two pieces of statistics really put things in perspective and encourage us to use our time even more wisely, which quite often means to adapt our driving habits so that we can pursue other activities or even outsource operating a vehicle to someone we trust.At any given moment that you are reading this article 660,000 people in the U.S are using electronic devices while driving.Throughout our practice we even had the case being brought to the High Court but luckily our young client, the boy with the injury, won and received the maximum compensation.In many urban areas in Sydney or Brisbane the speed limit is 50 kms/h so the commuters should keep their attention span focused on the road despite long hours at work.If you want to pull a longer highway journey, the rest areas are located every 80-100 kms but still the same rules apply, avoid using technology while driving and your alcohol level must be below 0.05 percent.Tesla, Mercedes, BMW and Google are on the brink of releasing self-driving cars which will be either semi- or fully-autonomous.
General Assembly, the education startup that offers courses online and on campus, has announced that it s doubling down on its global brick-and-mortar presence — expanding its physical campuses from 15 to 25 by the end of the year.Founded out of New York in 2011, General Assembly offers myriad courses across the technology spectrum, including web development, Android / iOS development, data science, and more.It also offers related courses that cover the likes of product management, business, design, and digital marketing.The company has raised $120 million to date, including a whopping $70 million round it closed last September.Flush with cash, General Assembly is now expanding into 10 new cities, its biggest expansion since the company s inception five years ago.Eight of the new hubs will be spread across the U.S. and Australia, including Brisbane, Brooklyn, Dallas, and San Jose, with an additional large market in the U.S. to be announced by the end of the year.Today s news also sees General Assembly expanding into Canada for the first time, with the acquisition of Toronto-based technology school Bitmaker.Interestingly, General Assembly won t be ditching the Bitmaker brand — the acquisition will continue operating as it currently does in Toronto, with the same team on board, but with General Assembly pulling the strings.Since launching, we ve worked with some of the most innovative companies and diverse individuals in the world, said Jake Schwartz, cofounder and CEO of General Assembly.
Motorcycle makers Alta Motors have opened the doors to their brand new factory in Brisbane, California.Inside, it s surprisingly quiet, thanks in part to the fact that the motorcycles Alta makes are all-electrics, and final assembly of these bikes is ultimately done by hand.The startup s flagship product, the Redshift MX, is a motocross bike newly shipping to dealers and retailing at $14,995.Why build their own factory rather than outsource to markets known for motorcycle manufacturing, especially Japan, home of Yamaha and others?Alta Motors CEO and cofounder Marc Fenigstein said, Everything we ve done in-house we ve been able to do faster, cheaper and at higher output than outsourced.The hardest part is bringing up a supply chain that delivers all 460 parts that we need on time on quality and on cost.
The local council of the Australian city of Brisbane has been fleeced of A$450,000 £248,000, US$334,000 from email-whaling scammers who tricked staff into wiring money into their bank accounts.The scammers phoned and emailed the council posing as one of its suppliers.Lord mayor Graham Quirk has commissioned Deloitte to conduct a review into how the scam took place.Quirk told reporters the scammers gained the cash in nine payments made since 13 July."It was then checked and it was found that the place where the cheques were going to was different to what the ridgy-didge* account was," Cr Quirk said.It was the largest scam against the council, Cr Quirk says.
This week we got news about the disposition of the current cinematic Superman he s not dark, just relatable, it turns out and about the moods of the Suicide Squad cast they re sort of sad about their lost scenes .But given the DC-centric focus of recent installments, let s put both of them to one side for a second and give Marvel, Sony, and Fox some air time.Here, dear patient readers, are the highlights of the last seven days worth of superhero movie news.SUPER IDEA: Tiny Teases from ThorAll manner of photos are coming from the Brisbane set of Thor: Raganrok, teasing plot details for the third Asgardian-centric movie from Marvel Studios.Why this is super: The fascinating thing about all these rumors is how disconnected they are from what we thought we knew about the movie.
The next time you hop on your iPhone for a little online shopping, why not add Elon Musk to your shopping cart?Or perhaps purchasing Kim Kardashian is more your speed?For a passive-aggressive gesture after a bad day at the office, feel free to go ahead and buy your boss.A lawsuit filed Wednesday in federal court in San Francisco accuses Twitter and local startup Hey of illegally allowing players of an online game to buy the Twitter profiles of real-life people, accumulating them like trophies or baseball cards.Hey never notifies or seeks consent from the tens of thousands of people featured in the app, the lawyers wrote.Indeed, Hey knows that the vast majority of the public disapproves of its app and wouldn t voluntarily allow it to use their names and photographs in a game that allows players to collect other human beings.Hey didn t respond to an email requesting comment.This isn t the first time Brisbane-based Hey has sparked controversy over its people-buying games.The game sold to Zynga in 2009, according to the suit.Then Hey founder Siqi Chen turned his attentions to a game he called Stolen, which allowed users to buy people s Twitter profiles using virtual currency — collecting friends, colleagues and celebrities alike.
But unless your friends are also on iOS 10, you won t be able to use these additions in your group chats.Based in Brisbane, Australia, Amity s bootstrapped team of eight has been working to create this more interactive messaging app over the course of the past two years.As with many messaging clients, Amity offers the ability to send rich media in your chats – that is, things like photos with filters, naturally , videos, links, voice messages, emojis, stickers, your location and more.Plus, Amity offers its own collections of custom, original stickers to choose from, eliminating the need for add-on keyboards.When chatting with the founder by phone this morning, I probably spent half the interview just tapping buttons in the chat app to try out all the different options, I have to admit.For instance, you can high five a friend, which makes an animated version of this gesture appear in your chat, or you can nudge them, which actually makes the whole screen appear to shake while your phone buzzes.
As Hyperloop One and competing firm Hyperloop Transportation Technologies HTT work separately toward the same goal of creating an ultra-high-speed transportation system for inter-city travel, a slew of countries from around the world have signaled an interest in the system for use in their own territories.Russia, India, the UAE, and Slovakia, for example, are all keen to see how the plan develops, with some already talking seriously about how Hyperloop, which would use passenger pods and magnetic accelerators to carry people through sealed metal tubes at speeds of up to 760 mph, could one day transform their existing transportation systems.While Australia looks at the viability of a 1100-mile Melbourne-to-Brisbane high-speed rail route – using the kind of slow technology that prompted SpaceX and Tesla CEO Elon Musk to dream up the Hyperloop idea back in 2013 – some in the country are suggesting the government should ditch the train plan and throw its weight behind the Hyperloop project instead.Matt O Callaghan, whose Melbourne-based VicHyper team has made it to the final group of competitors vying for the chance to design the passenger pods for the Hyperloop system, believes the Australian government should leapfrog High Speed Rail and go straight to developing Hyperloop, according to the Courier Mail.It s not just a pipe dream or a concept any more – it is quickly becoming reality, O Callaghan, who leads a team of 25 engineers based at Melbourne s RMIT University, told the Mail.The team will be presenting its ideas about Hyperloop at the Queensland Infrastructure Summit in Brisbane on Thursday, and hopes the government will consider its suggestions.
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