Report authors call on gov.UK, business to up their spendLeaving the EU could mean UK universities lose a whopping £1bn research funding, according to report released by Digital Science today.Their data showed the UK was the fifth-largest producer of science and technical articles behind USA, China, Japan and Germany, despite receiving just 1.63 per cent from public and private sectors in research.Figures from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development reveal that investment from UK companies contribute only 1.06 per cent of GDP toward research and development.This is below the average of many European countries and is almost 80 per cent lower than the R investment made by German businesses.Should the UK vote to leave next month, the report stresses that significant political efforts will need to be made to plug the funding gap and avoid long-term damage to the research and education sector .Ridley said that some of the biggest scientific organisations including The European Space Agency, The European Molecular Biology Organisation and CERN, were not EU-membership exclusive and was unfair if the EU parliament held the power to decide how money was spent.
And though expanding our knowledge of the subatomic realm remains her main focus, she s acutely aware that she is now a high-visibility role model for women around the world.The range of issues I have to deal with is much broader than before and includes scientific strategy and planning, budget, personnel aspects, relations with a large variety of stakeholders, etc.There is the question of the lack of role models, and there is the question of making workplaces more family friendly.We need to enable parents, men or women, to take breaks to raise families and we need to support parents with infrastructure and facilities.What are your goals for CERN during this period?CERN recently signed a set of agreements with the U.S. outlining U.S. participation in the upgrade of the LHC and CERN participation in neutrino projects at Fermilab in the U.S.
Sydney security tester Jamieson O'Reilly has reported a since-patched vulnerability in popular video platform Vidyo, used by the likes of the US Army, NASA, and CERN, that could see videos leaked and systems compromised.O'Reilly, director of intelligence for consultancy Content Protection, says he picked up the bug during a client test and reported it to the New Jersey video company which has since issued a patch.The company says some 3000 Fortune 100 SMB customers and 39 of the top 100 healthcare networks in the US use the product, together clocking more than 50 million minutes in talk time."I ended up finding an arbitrary file disclosure vulnerability," O'Reilly told The Register."There are a lot of publicly accessible Vidyo endpoints that are probably vulnerable that you can identify using Google."O'Reilly says the patch version 3.0.1.20 has been released to close the hole.
The day they finally came out, and the God particle—lo—appeared to the rest of Earth, Hollingsworth didn t even know it until a friend told him.Most people in the field would consider that the worst outcome possible, says Hollingsworth.He started looking for jobs about six months before finishing his PhD.One day—after the bump, but before the bump was heard round the world—Hollingsworth was having coffee with his CERN colleague Dave Stickland, whose wife was a dressage coach.The two founded a company Global Dressage Analytics, turning those score sheets into predictive models that guided horse training.That often keeps scientists playing it safe, sticking to topics that will reliably produce splashy results.
A new experiment looking at clouds is about to change the way we think about climate change.For decades, scientists have thought that the tiny particles that form clouds — and play a big role in keeping the planet cool — were produced as a counterintuitive side effect of pollution.So, while it was understood that we were putting loads of planet-warming gases into the atmosphere and heating things up, it was also thought that at least some of those particles were getting trapped inside clouds and helping to keep that warming from being even more catastrophic.But a study published on Wednesday in the journal Nature, which looked more closely at these tiny particles, found that they can be produced naturally.This will help us understand just how cloudy the world actually was before we started polluting it, which is key to figuring out the rate at which our planet is heating up.A cloud conundrumThe Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change IPCC recognizes aerosols as the single biggest source of uncertainty in human-driven climate change.Part of the problem is that we have no way of measuring just how cloudy the planet was in the preindustrial era.Thanks to this uncertainty, and despite our precise measurements of the effects of human-induced greenhouse warming on climate, the estimates for projected climate change have entertained a wide range of numbers for projected warming, and these numbers haven't changed for the past 35 years.The models predict that if carbon dioxide doubles over the next century, then the planet will warm anywhere from 2.7 to 8.1 degrees Fahrenheit — a critical difference that should inform the way we prepare for the future.So, what's the deal with aerosols?"We found that nature produces particles without pollution," Jasper Kirkby, a European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN particle physicist and the originator and spokesman of the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets CLOUD experiment, told Business Insider.To build a large chamber and keep contaminants below one in a trillion molecules is right at the limit of technology," Kirkby said.The scientists directed a beam of artificial cosmic rays from a CERN particle accelerator at the chamber to study the effects of cosmic ray ions on the rate of formation of aerosol particles.Although the effect of these cosmic rays is likely very small today because of the effect of pollution, in the preindustrial era they could have played a key role.
Photograph: docubyte/INK Dials and buttons, knobs and switches; they re very charming, says James Ball, the digital art director behind a new photography series called Guide to Computing, which celebrates early computers.Ball feels that computers that pre-date the Apple era aren t widely considered to be design pieces, and his nostalgia for this earlier, more naive aesthetic led him to seek out and photograph a range of machines that date from the latter half of the 20th century, representing them as if they were new and desirable products.Photograph: docubyte/INKAfter shooting the machines, which he largely found in the Science Museum in London, the Dresden Technical Collections and the National Museum of Computing at Bletchley Park, Ball painstakingly enhanced the images with the help of his colleagues at INK studio to make the computers look new.The retouching is quite important to the piece , he says, taking as an example the Pilot ACE, an early 1950s computer designed by Alan Turing, now in a state of semi-disrepair.CDC 6600: Designed by the father of supercomputing Seymour Cray and first used in the Cern laboratory in 1965.It was the fastest computer for many years, humiliating its IBM rivals.
The particle accelerator at CERN is round, why? Is not it easier to guide the protons in a linear accelerator? Give notice in Ny Teknik readers question. Reader Question: Large Hadron Collider at CERN is built as a circle with a diameter of 27 kilometers. But there are also linear accelerators. Why build not only linear accelerators?
:: Scientific CollaborationTwo of the biggest scientific projects on the continent - the European Space Agency and CERN which operates the Large Hadron Collider - have nothing to do with the EU and so would be unaffected by Article 50.Video: Corbyn On Sky News: The Best Bits:: Technology TalentOne of the loudest complaints you hear from technology start-ups in the UK is how hard it is to find technical talent - the engineers and data scientists to build platforms.:: Economic Myth Vs Reality Ahead Of EU VoteThe UK would also likely miss out on the next round of European tech giants setting up base here.The founders of Spotify and Transferwise, for example, set up their first bases in London, bringing jobs and tech kudos to the capital.UK technology companies may also lose access to the mooted European Single Digital Market, but this is unlikely to have much effect because US technology companies have shown it is extremely possible to make money outside it.:: Pound And FTSE 100 Soar On Referendum PollingIn the case of Brexit, this would lead - fairly immediately - to the following situation, according to Mahmoud Handy, the director of Detracker, an online privacy advisory firm: "UK companies, charities and universities will put more effort into the protection of privacy rights for Irish, German, Polish and other European citizens than for English users and students."
Particles, antiparticles and putting meat on bones of theoryPhoto credit: Institut für Experimentalphysik, University of InnsbruckPhysicists have built a quantum simulator to study the Standard Model of particle physics – a theory concerning the electromagnetic, weak, and strong nuclear interactions, as well as classifying all the subatomic particles known.The simulator includes lasers and four calcium ions, according to new research published in Nature paywalled .The light also depends on the interactions between the chain of calcium ions that are entangled.Since the experiment is a simulation, it does not directly probe the nature of particles like CERN European Organization for Nuclear Research does, explained Martinez.The quantum simulation allows more physicists to be more flexible with their models, whereas the experiments at CERN are more rigid and only detect the outcomes of the particle interactions.In the future, Martinez hopes that his team can use the quantum simulator to study confinement – the mysterious process that doesn't allow quarks to be separated.
In the referendum last week, the Leave campaign secured a narrow victory that has caused concern among many industries, not least technology.Read More: What Brexit means for technologyTech education5GIC university of Surrey 1 BCS, the chartered institute for IT, warns that UK universities received €8.8 billion in research grants over a six year period leading up to 2013 and that any shortfall could damage the high ranking of British universities.The organisation says any Brexit negotiations must ensure UK universities and academics are able to participate in pan-European initiatives like CERN and the European Space Agency and can contribute to standards bodies like those seeking to formalise 5G networks.Brexit has led many to fear that British based technology companies will not have access to the same talent pool if EU immigration is limited.BCS says it is of vital importance that university and industry labs are able to recruit the best minds from around the world and that levels of computer science education in the UK are improved to help cope with an ongoing digital skills gap.The world is now watching what happens here in the UK and is rushing to catch up, continued Mitchell.
Large Hadron Collider, LHC, at CERN is built as a circle with a diameter of 27 kilometers. But there are also linear accelerators. Is not it easier to guide the protons to be crashed together in one? A: The protons actually blykärnorna preheated in other accelerators before being fed into the LHC, where they are accelerated in 20 minutes. The advantage of a circle is that the acceleration can be continued for a long time, the protons circulating in up to ten hours. A ray going clockwise and the other counterclockwise.
Scientists working at CERN have found four new tetraquark particles comprised of the same four subatomic building blocks.These exotic particles don t last very long, and they probably don t play an important cosmological role, but the discovery reveals the surprising diversity of the tetraquark family.Researchers working at the Large Hadron Collider beauty LHCb collaboration have confirmed the existence of an entirely new four-quark particle, known as tetraquarks, and three new tetraquarks that had never been seen before.Illustration of a tetraquark Image: Fermilab First proposed in 1964 by physicists Murray Gell-Mann and George Zweig, quarks are a series of charged subatomic particles that form larger particles like protons and neutrons.For a time, scientists figured that quarks only came in varieties of two or three, but recent discoveries have revealed exotic configurations of four and even five quarks called a pentaquark .
Scientists working at CERN have found four new tetraquark particles comprised of the same four subatomic building blocks.These exotic particles don t last very long, and they probably don t play an important cosmological role, but the discovery reveals the surprising diversity of the tetraquark family.Researchers working at the Large Hadron Collider beauty LHCb collaboration have confirmed the existence of an entirely new four-quark particle, known as tetraquarks, and three new tetraquarks that had never been seen before.Illustration of a tetraquark Image: Fermilab First proposed in 1964 by physicists Murray Gell-Mann and George Zweig, quarks are a series of charged subatomic particles that form larger particles like protons and neutrons.For a time, scientists figured that quarks only came in varieties of two or three, but recent discoveries have revealed exotic configurations of four and even five quarks called a pentaquark .
The last thirty years of particle physics have been a little disappointing.A scientist s job is to prove themselves wrong, but despite their best efforts, despite recreating the conditions of the Big Bang, particle physicists just keep being correct.Scientists quickly submitted over 500 papers, each inventing a new way to explain the observations, which seemed to blast holes in the hull of the unsinkable Standard Model.But in a new paper uploaded last night, CERN makes it clear that the search will have to continue: The exciting measurements were nothing more than statistical blips.Scientists will discuss these results in more detail later today.The LHC, CERN s flagship project, searches for new physics by smashing together protons travelling vanishingly close to the speed of light.
Toward the end of last year, the people behind the Large Hadron Collider announced that they might have found signs of a new particle.Their evidence came from an analysis of the first high-energy data obtained after the LHC's two general-purpose detectors underwent an extensive upgrade.While the possible new particle didn't produce a signal that reached statistical significance, it did show up in both detectors, raising the hope that the LHC was finally on to some new physics.According to their data, the area of the apparent signal is filled by nothing but statistical noise.The Standard Model, which describes particles and forces, can be used to make predictions of the frequency at which specific particles will pop out of collisions, as well as what those particles will decay into.Looking for new particles involves looking for deviations from those predictions.
On his physics-insider blog, Résonaances, theorist Adam Falkowski titled his latest post After the Hangover.On July 29, Falkowski declared what CERN, the European organization that runs the Large Hadron Collider, hasn t yet: The Standard-Model-busting maybe-particle that has left physicists breathless since September actually isn t busting anything.Particle physicists usually wait to declare a discovery until their results reach five-sigma confidence: If they did the same experiment 3.5 million times, they would see this result by chance just once.And gossiping about it—on Facebook, Twitter, blogs.Within this physics rumor mill, the situation soon became clear: The LHC s data was a fluke.These break apart, spreading subatomic debris and energy.
File photo - FILE -In this March 22, 2007 file photo, the magnet core of the world's largest superconducting solenoid magnet CMS, Compact Muon Solenoid at the European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN 's Large Hadron Collider LHC particle accelerator, in Geneva, Switzerland.AP Photo/Keystone, Martial Trezzini, File Disappointed physicists from the Large Hadron Collider report that what initially could have been an intriguing new particle has turned out just to a statistical burp.Last December, researchers at the European Center for Nuclear Research saw two readings of what could have been a new particle that might have upended the existing main physics theory.The same center in 2012 discovered the Higgs boson or "God particle."The early unconfirmed new particle readings in December set the physics world abuzz.
On this day 25 years ago, August 6, 1991, the world's first website went live to the public from a lab in the Swiss Alps.So Happy 25th Birthday, WWW!The world's first website, which ran on a NeXT computer at the European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN , can still be visited today, more than two decades after its creation.The first website address is http://info.cern.ch/hypertext/WWW/TheProject.html."The project started with the philosophy that much academic information should be freely available to anyone."Berners-Lee wrote about the HyperText Transfer Protocol HTTP that outlined how information or data would travel between computer systems, as well as, HyperText Markup Language HTML that was used to create the first web page.Berners-Lee vision was to create a place where people could share information across the world through a "universal linked information system" – in which a network of documents web pages linked to one another could help users navigate to find what exactly they need.And so is the concept of the World Wide Web.
Today marks the 25 anniversary of Sir Tim Berners-Lee launching the first websiteOn this day 25 years ago the world's first website went live to the public.The site, created by Sir Tim Berners-Lee, was a basic text page with hyperlinked words that connected to other pages."The WWW project merges the techniques of information retrieval and hypertext to make an easy but powerful global information system," said Berners-Lee on the world's first public website.The NeXT computer Sir Tim Berners-Lee used to create the World Wide Web is still housed at CERNThe first step to making that a reality occurred on August 6, 1991, and was hailed with little fanfare when Berners Lee launched the first web page from his NeXT computer at CERN's headquarters in Geneva.
More than 25 years ago, in a research establishment in the Swiss Alps, a British-born computer scientist dreamt up a new way for academics to share information around the globe.Little did he realize that his invention would break out from the confines of academia and give birth to the global internet, the World Wide Web.However innovative, who knows whether the concept of globally hyperlinked documents would have taken the world by storm if it wasn't for a couple of political and commercial decisions that took place in those early years.Then, just a month later, CERN made its web technology free for anyone to use.The Mosaic web browser really epitomized the web of the mid-'90s, and it's also the product that is widely acknowledged to have first popularized the web.In the next five momentous years, no less than five versions of Internet Explorer and four of Netscape Navigator were released.
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