He said so in May, when he told the Associated Press, Obama got the votes much more so than his data processing machine, and I think the same is true with me.During the primaries, cable news, print media, and social media pundits made sure everyone heard Trump s message.The National Review first broke the news, citing an unnamed Trump campaign official, and WIRED has confirmed the development.In something so big, we want to bring in multiple data sources, a Trump aide says, to make sure we have the best opportunities to find the most persuadable voters and get people out to vote.Although Cambridge Analytica worked with Senator Ted Cruz and Ben Carson during the primaries, several Republican operatives tell WIRED they question the firm s methodology, willingness to collaborate, and claims of involvement in major projects like Brexit.And the fact that Robert Mercer, a major GOP donor, is an owner of the company leaves some wondering if nepotism plays a role in any contracts the company lands.
If you re in the U.S., this marketing data company has a psychology profile on youOct 17, 2016 by Barry LevineCambridge Analytica is transitioning from defense and political clients into the commercial market, with named profiles on every U.S. consumer.Just launched: Marketing Land s new MarTech Today website!Oct 17, 2016 by Matt McGeeOur new editorial website is laser-focused on the fast-growing world of marketing technology, an area of increasing importance to all marketers.
Trump campaign is targeting voters across America.Donald Trump and his campaign for the Presidency of the United States has turned to a UK based big data analytics firm to try and win over voters.Cambridge Analytica has been paid large sums of money, $5m in September alone, to try and help influence voters and how they will vote.With data on 230 million adults in the U.S. and around 4,000 data points on each of them, the hope is that all of this information can help the Trump campaign understand how individuals will lean politically, and how to potentially influence a change of mind.The data includes things like transaction information from loyalty card, charity donations, gym memberships and more that the Trump campaign is using.CEO Alexander Nix, told NBC News: The more you know about someone, the better you can engage with them and the more relevant you can make the communications that you send to them, so our job is to use data to understand audiences.
I still don t know if it s hit me yet, he said in an interview Wednesday, after about four hours of sleep.The election upset is seen as a coup for Cambridge Analytica, the U.S. arm of a British behavioral research and strategic communications company called SCL Group Ltd.The company also assisted the Leave.EU group in the U.K. ahead of the surprising Brexit vote to exit from the European Union and did work for the failed presidential campaign of Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas.Cambridge Analytica is funded in part by Robert Mercer, a computer scientist and co-chief executive of secretive quantitative hedge fund Renaissance Technologies.Mr. Mercer was a pivotal supporter of Mr. Trump, donating millions to the campaign.It is too early to assess the full impact Cambridge Analytica had on the Trump campaign.
Campaigns of one are a common refrain today among digital marketers, replacing mass market campaigns with highly pinpointed orchestrations of content, offers, ads, and more directed at individuals.But that pinpoint keeps getting sharper and sharper, driven by a massive influx of new types of data and by increasingly intelligent platforms.At some point, do we reach over-personalization, when the messaging has crossed the line into creepy?And, if so, is there a way to deal with it at scale?There are signs everywhere that over-personalization is approaching.For instance, Cambridge Analytica — the data firm for Donald Trump s campaign — claims it has created psychological profiles for every adult consumer in the U.S.
Every time the Trump name is uttered, viewers tune in, ratings go up, and ads are sold.But the point I made at The Brand Safety Summit was and still is this: Everyone has some ownership over the outcome of the election, regardless of how they voted.With the help of the team at Cambridge Analytica, the data analytics company behind Trump s win, the now president-elect leveraged digital advertising for everything it was ever designed to be.I was invited to the Cambridge Analytica office post-election, and their team graciously pulled back the covers on the strategy they used to help Trump turn his audience into voters who won him the election.This campaign used digital advertising to its fullest, but what does that mean?Cambridge researchers collected survey data — specifically in battleground states that included hard IDs, live dials and IVRs Interactive Voice Responses .
Marketers spend billions on TV ads during the big game, but for those who can't, social can be an effective alternative.At this point, the Super Bowl is as much a marketing extravaganza as it is the biggest sporting event of the year.It's a night that advertisers have poured more than $4 billion dollars into over the last 50 years, but much of that money — and the majority of the marketing hype around the game — is in TV.The cost of Super Bowl TV ad placements preclude the vast majority of brands from participating, and social media has become the democratizing agent many brands rely on to tie themselves and their audiences to the game.It's a sound strategy for the most part, but begs the question of whether marketing around the Super Bowl is truly worth it outside of TV.Afterall, UFC 205 generated three times the social media impressions of the last Super Bowl 14 billion , so the Big Game hardly boasts the same stature on social as on TV.
Billionaire property mogul and reality TV star Donald Trump was considered to be the least likely person to become US president – and yet, despite the controversial comments, the threat of lawsuits and lukewarm support from the Republican party, somehow he did it.It's not an easy profession – incredibly smart data scientists are required to combine computer science, statistics and applied mathematics to visualise data in such a way to produce crucial information that might be missed if you had to rely on only humans to detect patterns, and the results, known as 'analytics', are meant to help businesses make smarter decisions.Understanding what a 'Trump voter' would wantEnter Cambridge Analytica, the US affiliate of a private British behavioural research and strategy communication company called SCL Group SCL stands for Strategic Communication Laboratories ."We were hired to understand how a Trump voter is different from a generic Republican voter.He brings a very unique style, and stance on issues, a different bravado and name ID, so we built all our modelling on who we should talk to and how we should talk to them specifically for his campaign," Cambridge Analytica's head of product Matthew Oczkowski, who ran the Trump data campaign, tells IBTimes UK.
Sales at Facebook -- in which I have no financial interest -- soared 51% to $8.8 billion in the fourth quarter of 2016 -- beating expectations by $300 million.Three reasons say it's worth the risk of over-paying.Before getting into those reasons, let's take a look at the role that Facebook played in tilting the election results., greeableness how considerate and cooperative you are?In 2012, Kosinski proved that "on the basis of an average of 68 Facebook "likes" by a user, it was possible to predict their skin color with 95% accuracy , their sexual orientation 88% accuracy , and their affiliation to the Democratic or Republican party 85% ," reportedAnd that database somehow came into the hands of Cambridge Analytica -- a company owned by US software billionaire Robert Mercer and his daughter of which Stephen Bannon is a board member -- that took in a total of $15 million from the Trump campaign, according to Das Magazin.
The intervention by the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) follows revelations in last week’s Observer that a technology company part-owned by a US billionaire played a key role in the campaign to persuade Britons to vote to leave the European Union.“We intend to publicise our findings later this year.”The ICO spokeswoman confirmed it had approached Cambridge Analytica over its apparent use of data following the story in the Observer.Reportedly part-owned by US billionaire Robert Mercer, it claims to have played an influential role in the US election, using its data-crunching ability to identify key swing voters.Last week, Andy Wigmore, the communications director of the pro-Brexit campaign group, Leave.EU, told the Observer they had been introduced to the company by the Mercer family.“Because Nigel is a good friend of the Mercers.
An official inquiry has been launched into how personal data has been collected and exploited in political campaigns such as Brexit and Donald Trump's presidential race.It comes after it was revealed how data science firms such as Cambridge Analytica – which is backed by the US billionaire Robert Mercer – influenced millions of voters with targeted messages based on online activity.The company openly talked about how it used Facebook and other social media sites to build detailed profiles of voters, but has denied any wrongdoing since details of an investigation were confirmed.A spokeswoman for the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) confirmed to the Guardian that an inquiry has been launched."We are conducting a wide assessment of the data-protection risks arising from the use of data analytics, including for political purposes, and will be contacting a range of organisations," the ICO spokeswoman said.She added: "We have concerns about Cambridge Analytica's reported use of personal data and we are in contact with the organisation."
The information watchdog is scrutinising the use of the public's private data for political purposes following concerns over an analytics firm linked to the Leave.EU campaign.The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) said it is assessing how data analytics impacts on data protection.It has raised concerns about reports linking Cambridge Analytica (CA) to Leave.EU, backed by Nigel Farage.A CA spokesman said it is compliant with UK and EU data law.The company uses artificial intelligence to identify key voters.On Friday, Labour MP Stephen Kinnock, who supported the Remain camp, called on the Electoral Commission to investigate allegations that Leave.EU had not declared the role of CA in its campaign.
In 2013, when working at the University of Cambridge's Psychometrics Centre, Kosinski co-authored a scientific paper showing that Facebook likes successfully predicted whether someone voted Democrat or Republican 85 per cent of the time, sexual orientation in 88 per cent of men and whether someone was African American or Caucasian American in 95 per cent of cases.Even though Facebook likes are no longer public, there are plenty of social media alternatives.Instead of assuming that somehow we can get our privacy back, we should focus on shaping culture, societies and law to accommodate for the post-privacy future."Jon Morris, professor of advertising at the University of Florida, says that the concept of "early adopters" was first described by Everett Rogers in 1962, and electrocardiogram tests have been used since the 1950s."Psychological profiling, using any kind of a device or any kind of questioning, may have become a little more sophisticated, but it's certainly been around forever in the life of advertising," he says.Kosinski acknowledges that advertising has used psychological grouping for decades, but believes the technique he demonstrated allows greater accuracy.
The company has repeatedly claimed it helped Donald Trump win the US presidency and got the Brexiters' "Leave" cause over the line has arrived in Australia.According to Reuters, Cambridge Analytica has registered an office in Maroubra, Sydney, and Liberal Party director Tony Nutt says the party plans to meet company representatives this week.(Reuters mis-identifies Nutt as a “government official”, which he's not.)Cambridge Analytica's Matthew Oczkowski was listed to speak at the Australian Direct Marketing Association's https://www.adma.com.au/people/alexander-nix “Data Day” presentations (at the Four Seasons Hotel in Sydney today; Sofitel Melbourne on Collins on Wednesday), but if Reuters is correct, he'll be either joined or replaced by CEO Alexander Nix, ahead of their meeting with the Liberal Party.The company claims to have swung votes using a technique called “behavioural microtargeting”: profiling people using public information like Facebook “likes”.As The Register noted in March, there's some expert scepticism to deal with.
The company has repeatedly claimed it helped Donald Trump win the US presidency and got the Brexiters' "Leave" cause over the line has arrived in Australia.According to Reuters, Cambridge Analytica has registered an office in Maroubra, Sydney, and Liberal Party director Tony Nutt says the party plans to meet company representatives this week.(Reuters mis-identifies Nutt as a “government official”, which he's not.)Cambridge Analytica's Matthew Oczkowski was listed to speak at the Australian Direct Marketing Association's “Data Day” presentations (at the Four Seasons Hotel in Sydney today; Sofitel Melbourne on Collins on Wednesday), but if Reuters is correct, he'll be either joined or replaced by CEO Alexander Nix, ahead of their meeting with the Liberal Party.The company claims to have swung votes using a technique called “behavioural microtargeting”: profiling people using public information such as Facebook “likes”.As The Register noted in March, there's some expert scepticism to deal with.
This week, Travis and Stewart interview Spencer Liu, CEO of KTplay, about the importance of community, how to build one in a smartphone-driven world, and how mobile games can benefit from bringing fans together.In the news, we discover machine learning techniques that can identify who you are from just your social media status updates.We also find out why a shopping bot won a major award at SXSW and get an update on where we are with 360-degree livestreaming video.Cambridge Analytica has been around for a while, influencing election results.IBM Watson and how it uses emotions and personality traits in marketing, as discussed with Stephen Gold in episode VB043.Lily is a new chatbot that helps women buy clothes, with the aspiration of helping empower women to make them be the “best version of themselves.” [08:00]
PACAC’s report Lessons learned from the EU referendum gained considerable attention for highlighting the possibility that foreign Governments interfered with the referendum.The voter registration website crashed last June threatening disenfranchisement of thousands, forcing the Government to extend the registration deadline.The committee reported that the crash had indications of a botnet attack on the voter registration website.Crashing a website is a technical instance where cause, effect and hopefully blame can be established.An elite group is shaping world politics to suit their private beliefs, their behaviour having untold and unquantifiable affects.Billionaire Robert Mercer is Donald Trump’s biggest donor.
As your mind wearily contemplates being exposed to yet another political campaign, are your dreams haunted by battle buses, billboards and TV debates?On the evidence of last year’s EU referendum, much of the campaigning, and much of the money spent on political advertising, will be online.Two other campaign groups – both of which received large donations from the Leave campaign - gave Aggregate IQ a further £765,000, taking the total pumped through the company to almost £3.5m.Vote Leave director Dominic Cummings is quoted on the company’s website saying “We couldn’t have done it without them.”Yet the invoices for the money they paid to Aggregate IQ, which were handed to the Electoral Commission, list vague jargon-filled specifications with little indication of how the ads were delivered.It may tell us Aggregate IQ were running a “targeted video app installed and display media campaign” but gives no clue about where those ads appeared or who saw them.
p While in the first round of the French Presidential election, opinion polls got the results to within 1% correct, the industry as a whole has taken quite the beating of late.While much has been written about the flaws in polling companies’ models, or wrong assumptions that they have made which led to mistakes, there is a missing element from this debate.Traditionally polling and research companies will semi-randomly select people to create a representative sample based on certain assumptions about future behaviour and historical data.However, this flawed approach is not necessary any more to find out people’s voting or spending preferences.With the advent of social media now more than ever information about our beliefs, our values, our ideas and us is publicly available.Combine this with the ability for artificial intelligence platforms to analyse large amounts of data in record time, it is entirely possible to predict behaviour from the information we, and the people we know happily share with the world.
According to the Electoral Commission, political parties spent almost £1.5m on targeted Facebook advertising during the 2015 general election.The Conservative party reported digital ad spend during the 2015 campaign of £1.21m; the Labour Party, £160,000; the Liberal Democrats £22,245; UKIP £91,000; the Green Party £20,000; and SNP £5,466.The permutation of hundreds of targeting variables, and the dynamic nature of ads, means that a campaign tailored to individual voters is hidden from everyone but advertiser and recipient.This project shines a much-needed light on the hidden side of electioneering," said Dr Seth Thevoz, a political historian at Nuffield College, Oxford University.is a citizen-led non-partisan project founded by Sam Jeffers and Louis Knight-Webb.“For the good of our democracy, it’s time to throw some light on this dark and unregulated area of campaign spending.
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