The nominations for this year’s British LGBT Awards have now been announced, with RuPaul, Elliot Page, Phillip Schofield, Lil Nas X and Anne-Marie among the stars who’ve been recognised.The Channel 4 drama It’s A Sin has also been nominated for an award, as have Strictly Come Dancing and the hit comedy Schitt’s Creek.In the running in the main Celebrity category are Oscar nominee Elliot Page, who came out as trans last year, as well as Jameela Jamil, Fleabag’s Andrew Scott and singer Demi Lovato.Chart-topping stars Lil Nas X, MNEK and Anne-Marie have received nods in the Music Artist category, alongside Brit nominees Rina Sawayama and Harry Styles as well as YouTube personality Jojo Siwa, who came out earlier this year.Meanwhile, in the Media Moment category are TV shows like It’s A Sin, Schitt’s Creek, Hollywood and Feel Good, as well as Christmas film Happiest Season.Phillip Schofield has been nominated in the Broadcaster, Journalist or Host category for the first time, as have his This Morning co-star Dr Ranj Singh, Vogue editor Edward Enninful and daytime star Steph McGovern.The latest series of RuPaul’s Drag Race has been nominated for its inclusion of its first trans man, Gottmik, as has Strictly Come Dancing, for featuring its first same-sex partnership last year.For this year’s awards show, there are also two categories for celebrities who have shown allyship to the LGBTQ+ community.Charli XCX, Michelle Visage, Schitt’s Creek’s Dan Levy and Jane Fonda are all in the running for Celebrity Ally, while a new category has been created for “Football Ally”.Among these nominees are Gary Lineker, Jamie Vardy and Jordan Henderson.Check out the full list of nominees below, ahead of the British LGBT Awards on 27 August...CELEBRITYAdam LambertAndrew ScottCara DelevingneDemi LovatoElliot PageGillian AndersonJameela JamilRuPaul Tan FranceWillow Smith MTV - MUSIC ARTISTAnne-MarieHarry StylesJojo SiwaKim PetrasLil Nas X Lizzo The 1975MNEKRina SawayamaSam Smith CELEBRITY ALLYCharli XCXDermot O’Leary Eugene LevyGeorge ClooneyJane FondaJennifer LopezJennifer SaundersJodie ComerMelanie CMichelle Visage BROADCASTER, JOURNALIST OR HOSTDr Ranj SinghEdward EnninfulJamie WindustJoe LycettPhillip SchofieldRose & RosieSteph McGovernSuzi RuffellTom AllenTom Read Wilson MEDIA MOMENTBBC America’s Killing EveCBBC’s The Next StepChristmas romance Happiest SeasonMae Martin’s Feel GoodNetflix’s Haunting Of Bly ManorNicola Adams and Katya Jones on Strictly Come DancingRuPaul’s Drag Race for welcoming Gottmik, a trans man, onto the showRussell T Davies’ It’s a SinRyan Murphy’s HollywoodSchitt’s Creek finale SWINTON GROUP - FOOTBALL ALLY Conor CoadyDanny WelbeckGary CahillGary LinekerGraeme SounessHector BellerinJamie VardyJordan HendersonJurgen KloppRicharlison de Andrade INSPIRATIONAL LEADERAlex Kalomparis, GileadJonathan Taylor, BNP ParibasJosh Graff, LinkedInJulia Atwater, AtosLucy Bradbury, AECOMLucy McKillop, Clear ChannelNicci Take, MercerPaul Donovan, UBSRichard Moor, National GridStephen Jacques, Key Assets Group (Europe) HSBC UK - BUSINESS ALLYAlan Haywood, BPBrian McNamara, GSKCait O’Riordan, FTCarol Lukaszewicz, M & GEmma Smith, VodafoneJohn Soutar, HomeServeJonathan Howe, PwCPhilipp Lohan, NielsenSharon Hague, PearsonTia Ferguson, NatWest DIVERSITY HEROAnthony Dunn, Johnson and JohnsonChris Wilkinson, Homes England Clare Coates, BarclaysDeon Pillay, LGIMFilipe Mota da Silva, Tata Consultancy ServicesLisa Pinney MBE, Coal Authority Lynne Nicholls, Clarion HousingScarlet-Marie Morgan, AllianzScott Sallee, Dentsu InternationalStephen Nutt, NSPCC MACQUARIE - FUTURE LEADERAdam Shooman, State StreetAfonso Varatojo Januário, SchrodersElliot Briery, Oliver WymanHarry Levey, Network RailJennifer Spilling, Moody’sJung Wei Toh, HSBC UK Justin Farrance, Allen & Overy Noémie Lefort, Warner Music Group Tyler Lee, UnileverVictoria Jackson, BLM Law EXCEPTIONAL INCLUSIONChris Kenna, Brand AdvanceClaire Brody, DisneyGeorgina Court, Clifford ChanceGreg Turner-Smart, Rolls-RoyceGuilherme Zardo Klein, Philip Morris agencyGurchaten Sandhu, United Nation’s International Labour OrganizationJessica Williams, MaceLouise Bailey, SSENigel Moralee, Sage (Accounting software)Sarah Fennell, Macquarie NETWORK GROUP (ERG)Emerge, ViacomCBS’ LHBT+ Employee Resource Group, ViacomJacobs - Prism Network, JacobsJust Eat Takeaway LGBT+ Network, Just Eat [email protected], SkyLGBTQ+ at Tesco, TescoLondon Stock Exchange Proud Network, [email protected], [email protected], ShellSEGA LGBTQ+ Network, SEGATalkPride, Talk Talk  TESCO - INCLUSIVE EMPLOYER OR COMPANYAvanti West CoastCapcoITVKPMGNestléO2Sainsbury’sTidewayTSBWickes ONLINE INFLUENCERAbigail ThornAdam EliChar EllesseEricka HartFlorence GivenJessica Kellgren-FozardKate MorossMarie Ulven RingheimPhil Lester Yves Mathieu NETWORK RAIL - BRAND OR MARKETING CAMPAIGNArgos Cadbury’s Creme EggCalvin KleinClean&ClearFairy Liquid LGBT+ rebrand GSK Consumer Healthcare (Sensodyne, Voltarol)Marks and Spencer LGBT sandwich Starbucks’ Name AdvertUnilever (Lynx, Vaseline, Simple, Close Up)Wagamamas gender neutral toilets JOHNSON & JOHNSON - CHARITY OR COMMUNITY INITIATIVEBan Conversion TherapyDrag Queen Story Hour UKFringe! Queer Film & Arts FestInclusive MosqueIt Gets BetterJust Like UsMindline TransOpening Doors LondonThe Outside ProjectUK Black Pride OUTSTANDING CONTRIBUTION TO LGBT+ LIFEDJ RituDr S ChelvanHelen JonesHolestarJim MacSweeney Leni MorrisLou EnglefieldMatthew Mahmood OgstonPaul Martin OBEReverend Jide MacaulayREAD MORE:Elliot Page Speaks Out Over ‘Upsetting, Cruel And Exhausting’ US Transgender Bills7 Reasons Why Lil Nas X Is The LGBTQ Icon The World Needs Right NowIt’s A Sin’s Omari Douglas: ‘There Are So Many Stories Out There Waiting To Be Told’
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LG OLED TVs already offer the pinnacle of home entertainment, but the 2021 range is set to improve on that legacy even further. A new series of OLED televisions – the G1 Series, C1 Series, B1 Series, and A1 Series – has launched, and its set to astound your eyes and ears alike.Its easy to see the advantages that LGs impressive OLED televisions offer. The self-lighting pixels in OLED panels allow for astonishing brightness control and precision when it comes to which pixels are lit, which are off, and the infinite contrast ratio between them – something you simply dont get with traditional LCD TVs.The deep blacks and bright highlights found with OLED make for a truly dynamic picture, with 100% colour fidelity to ensure hues look true-to-life and natural. The latest Dolby Vision IQ technology means that LG OLEDs are even able to sense the level of ambient light around them, and reactively calibrate HDR images for that perfect home cinema experience. Dolby Atmos support means that the entire range also packs in surround sound-quality audio, giving a sense of a movie theatre, a sports stadium, or a packed concert hall from the comfort of your own home. (Image credit: LG) Style, substance and streaming OLED TVs dont need a backlight, making them some of the slimmest and sleekest televisions around. Whether youre mounting one flush against a wall, perching it on a countertop, or making use of the new Gallery Stand accessory to show your TV off in style, LGs OLED range can impress as a living room centerpiece or blend into the decor of your home.LG OLEDs flicker-free technology and certified low blue light levels make them a great choice for long films, TV show binges, or all-night gaming sessions, allowing you to experience the best in home entertainment in true comfort.And when it comes to gaming, a breathtaking 1ms response time and super-low input lag will make sure games feel seamless and responsive, with imperceptible delays to the action. The HDMI 2.1 ports on the B Series, C Series and G Series mean you can make the most of next-gen consoles capable of outputting 4K resolution games at 120 frames per second – while support for ALLM (auto low latency mode), as well as screen-tearing reduction technologies like Nvidia G-Sync and VRR (variable refresh rate), will ensure your play sessions look smooth at all times too.LGs world-beating webOS smart platform features all the streaming apps you could possibly need too, with the likes of Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, Disney Plus and Now TV – alongside full support for Freeview Play, the UK broadcaster catchup service for BBC and ITV channels, as well as Channel 4 and Channel 5. You can even access the streaming platform Twitch! (Image credit: LG) The C1 Series The C1 Series – which is now available to order – will be the go-to LG OLED for many this year, with the crisp detail of 4K resolution and a new α9 Gen 4 AI processor to elevate any source to sharp and colourful heights. This new chip automatically detects and optimises for the kind of content displayed onscreen, meaning you can sit back and enjoy the show without endlessly fiddling in your televisions picture settings. The C1 Series, like the rest of the range, also features LGs famed Magic Remote, for a host of intuitive ways to interact with your television, whether scrolling, point-and-clicking, or verbally summoning content thanks to LG ThinQ or controlling your smart home via the built-in Alexa and Google Assistant support. Buy the LG C1 from Currys today The G1 Series (Image credit: LG) The G1 Series is LGs premium alternative, packing in the same format support, streaming apps, and 4K HDR capability, but with a new OLED evo panel enhancement that ekes even more brightness out of the OLED screen for a clearer and more impactful picture. The G1 is especially slim at just 23.1mm thickness (55" model), with a built-in flush wall mount to make it fit seamlessly against any wall in your home. A separate table stand or floor-standing Gallery Stand is also available to purchase separately. The G1 Series is on sale now. Buy the LG G1 from Currys today The B1 Series (Image credit: LG) LGs B1 Series (release date TBA) uses the same impressive OLED panel as the C1 Series, with a less powerful α7 Gen 4 AI processor to get this television into your home at a lower overall cost. The same lineup of streaming apps, Dolby Atmos audio, Dolby Vision IQ, and gaming functionality like VRR and ALLM mean you’re still getting a broad set of features in a slim and stylish display. Buy the LG B1 from Currys today The A1 Series (Image credit: LG) The A1 Series (launching April 10) is a new debut for 2021, offering a more entry-level OLED TV with 60Hz display, though still with the vast majority of perks and technologies of the other televisions above. Its α7 Gen 4 AI chip offers capable processing in line with the B1 Series, while the inherent picture quality of OLED plus Dolby technology make it a great choice for movie lovers. If youre after an affordable OLED TV that doesnt compromise on performance, this is the set for you. Buy the LG A1 from Currys today
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Prince Philip died Friday at the age of 99, prompting the BBC to scrap its usual programming to run tributes and royal news bulletins.
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The trial of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine in children has been paused while regulators investigate reports of a rare form of blood clot among adults.The University of Oxford said that no safety concerns have arisen from the trial itself.But it is waiting for more information from the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) before giving any more vaccinations.Regulatory bodies from the UK, Europe and the World Health Organisation (WHO) are assessing data on the jab and a potential association with a rare form of blood clot.The WHO and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) have confirmed they will publish findings later this week.The University of Oxford said in a statement: “Whilst there are no safety concerns in the paediatric clinical trial, we await additional information from the MHRA on its review of rare cases of thrombosis/thrombocytopaenia that have been reported in adults, before giving any further vaccinations in the trial.“Parents and children should continue to attend all scheduled visits and can contact the trial sites if they have any questions.”Sage adviser Professor Calum Semple said that the decision was made out of “exceptional caution” and urged people to continue accepting Oxford/AstraZeneca jabs.He told Channel 4 News: “This has been done out of exceptional caution and the big story still is that for a middle-aged, slightly overweight man, such as myself, my risk of death is one in 13,000 – the risk of this rare clot, which might not even be associated with the vaccine, is probably one in a million.“So I’m still going to say it’s better to get the vaccine than not get the vaccine and we can pause and take time to carefully consider the value for children because they’re not at risk of death from Covid.”He added: “If you’ve been called for the vaccine then you’re in an age group that is very likely to benefit from the vaccine. So the bottom line is if you’ve been called for the vaccine I would urge you to take the vaccine.”The prime minister urged the public to trust the regulator on vaccine safety.Boris Johnson said getting the population vaccinated was “the key thing”, while he visited the AstraZeneca manufacturing plant in Macclesfield.“On the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine, the best thing people should do is look at what the MHRA (Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency) say, our independent regulator – that’s why we have them, that’s why they are independent,” he said.“Their advice to people is to keep going out there, get your jab, get your second jab.”He added: “The best thing of all is to vaccinate our population, get everybody out getting the jab, that’s the key thing and that’s what I would advocate, number one”.The MHRA is also investigating reports of a very rare and specific type of blood clot in the brain, known as cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST), occurring together with low levels of platelets (thrombocytopenia) following vaccination.It has not confirmed when it will report its findings.The EMA’s said that its safety committee has “not yet reached a conclusion and the review is currently ongoing” but it is expected to announce findings on Wednesday or Thursday.Meanwhile, experts from the WHO confirmed they were also convening a panel of experts to assess the data and will publish findings on Wednesday or Thursday.Dr Rogerio Pinto de Sa Gaspar, director of regulation and prequalification at the WHO, said: “There is no link for the moment between the vaccine and thrombolytic events with thrombocytopenia.“There are a number of committees and regulatory authorities looking at data and new data is coming every day and [they are] assessing those data.“Of course it’s under evaluation and we wait for some feedback from those committees in coming days and hours.“The appraisal that we have for the moment, and this is under consideration by the experts, is that the benefit-risk assessment for the vaccine is still largely positive.”He announced that the WHO will convene its Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety to examine the data.“So we expect that probably by the end of Wednesday or Thursday we might have a fresh conclusive assessment from our experts,” he added.“But at the present moment we are confident that the benefits risk assessment for the vaccine is largely still positive.”The MHRA has said it identified 30 cases of rare blood clot events out of 18.1 million doses of the jab administered up to and including March 24.There have been seven deaths among the 30 cases.But the regulator said the benefits of the vaccine in preventing coronavirus outweigh any risks and it urged the public to continue coming forward for the jab.MHRA chief executive Dr June Raine said: “People should continue to get their vaccine when invited to do so.“Our thorough and detailed review is ongoing into reports of very rare and specific types of blood clots with low platelets following the Covid-19 vaccine AstraZeneca.“No decision has yet been made on any regulatory action.”The 30 cases in the UK include 22 reports of CVST and eight of other thrombosis events with low platelets.CVST clots stop blood draining from the brain properly.Related...UK's Vaccine Rollout 'On Track' Despite Sharp Slowdown In JabsI'm Fully Vaccinated. 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Two months after It’s A Sin debuted in the UK, Omari Douglas is still fascinated by the triumphant reception to the Russell T Davies show that carved a new path for LGBTQ representation and became All4’s most-streamed series ever.He’s still processing the digital fanfare and deluge of fan art he’s received, created by audiences responding to his character Roscoe, a young queer Black man who leaves his socially conservative family for the bright lights of London.Of the fan responses, he says: “I was fascinated that we were seeing so much fan art. You really do have to be moved by something to go away and make your own art.”Sharing the story of a recent remarkable interaction with one fan, Omari says: “Someone tagged me in a Twitter thread of a guy who had lost touch with his uncle. He’d seen lots of pictures of him when he was young and he posted these pictures in this thread.“His uncle was this very flamboyant Black man with dreads, very punky, similar to Roscoe. Basically this guy watched the show and it encouraged him to reconnect with his uncle, who he’s not spoken to for years.”This has been the pull of It’s A Sin – not only has it been lauded by critics for bringing to life both the humanity and the joy of the era in which it’s set, it also acts as a fitting tribute to those that lost their lives in the early years of the AIDS epidemic.“It’ll be something I reflect on for a very long time,” Omari tells HuffPost UK ahead of a talk he’s doing on intersectional communities as part of The Great United festival online on 3 April.“Taking on something of that size as my first television experience, the imposter syndrome is huge. To step into an environment like that and join this cast of really stellar people, and have all of these cameras around you, having this huge learning experience from the get-go.”The immense popularity the show has enjoyed has given Omari a platform which he hopes to exploit to create more work representing minority communities, such as the queer Black community he is a part of. His intersectional identities, and the communities they form, are the subject of his upcoming talk.He hopes to write, as well as star in, more work representing the lives of queer Black Britons, and admires the likes of I May Destroy You’s Michaela Coel for driving forward the culture of actors from minority communities telling stories which are different from what has been seen before.However, he insists there’s still a long way to go.“I can only imagine that there are so many stories out there that are waiting to be told,” he says. What is the block in having more diverse stories told, following the huge success of shows like I May Destroy You and It’s A Sin?“I think a lot of it has to do with the gatekeepers who allow those stories to be put on screen because a lot of the time these things are seen as risks,” he says. “Everything is considered a risk, and yet time and time again – go back to Michaela Coel, you only have to look at how her ownership of storytelling created something so unique and pivotal in television history.“Yet it’s funny how things are still considered risky and people are constantly having to prove things work. You look again at Russell pitching It’s A Sin. It was meant to be given eight episodes, it was given four and then he pushed for a fifth.” Now that there’s a track record of shows representing minority communities succeeding in ratings terms, as well as culturally, what’s still got to change to get more diverse shows commissioned? “A lot of that has to do with people thinking, ‘How does the world as a whole relate to this fundamentally queer story?’” he says. “And yet you only have to look at the results and go, well,I think we’re very much past things being niche.” Omari describes “such broadness and universality in these stories” – and hopes for change. “I just hope that the people who hold the power to let those people in and put those stories on screen and on stage, they just give way and allow for more of that.”Another recent blockbuster show that sparked a lot of conversation on the topic of representative storytelling is Bridgerton. It enlisted a racially diverse cast and employed “colour-conscious” casting, where actors from diverse backgrounds are consciously chosen for certain roles.However, Omari thinks the fanfare around Bridgerton and its diversity misses the point. “It was interesting seeing the media reaction to it,” he says. “People were sort of reacting to it as if it was a stylistic, creative choice, when actually, again, it proves how we’ve been spoon-fed such a contrived and concentrated viewpoint of history.”“The fact people were so shocked to see Black people moving in aristocratic circles when that happened,” he adds, laughing in disbelief. “Do you know what I mean? I think it just proves we’ve got so much work to do in terms of making those parts of history visible, because otherwise you’re always going to get that reaction. ‘Oooh that’s an interesting stylistic choice’.” He says of Bridgerton in particular: “It felt like some of the reaction to it was quite patronising and a little bit condescending. ‘How brilliant to look at it from that angle,’ and it’s like, no.“People were so shocked to look at people like Queen Charlotte. ‘Oh my god I didn’t know that.’ So yeah, I think we’ve just got lots of work to do.”The issue goes deeper. “When I think about the UK and the things we consume, we’re really quite obsessed with white British period dramas, and I think about where non-white characters come into play,there’s never any sort of like real spotlight on those stories and again, it’s about how high up the chain we’re looking,” he says of how to enact change.“I think obviously people like Julian Fellowes have had such great success with Downton Abbey, but when people latch onto images like that they take it away as being the one set image of what British history is.”He continues: “We have a responsibility as people who make television, we forget how formative television is. It’s education to people, it’s the stuff you see when you’re outside of the classroom and if we’re not showing a broad enough perspective then we’re just white-washing history.” I was just completely blown away by just seeing so much art - that’s been really touching"Omari DouglasOmari hopes his own work in this field will particularly focus on more historical revisions, to tell Black stories that have previously been excluded. He found some inspiration for his own writing while rifling through the BFI archives when researching for his role as Roscoe in It’s A Sin. “So many fascinating bits of archive footage,” he says. “Amazing artists like Isaac Julian. It’s a matter of going out there and hunting for it, which is what it feels like, because some of it doesn’t feel that readily available. We need to press on and make more of this stuff, otherwise it’s like hunting for a mine. It’s like, you’re scraping to look for these things when really they should be readily available to us.”While his next acting role is yet to be announced, the 27-year-old – who’s based in Wolverhampton – doesn’t correct me when I say offers must be flying in.In the future, he says he’d love to write and star in historical queer Black stories that “open up narratives that we haven’t seen at all,” he says, adding: “There’s a lot of queer Black historical figures that have been given no limelight.”But for now, there’s more It’s A Sin fan art to get back to. “I was just completely blown away by just seeing so much art right from the get-go,” he says. “That’s just been really touching.”Omari’s event is a part of The Great United festival, which takes place online at 3pm on April 3. Tickets are available here, and free for those who cannot afford the full price. 10% of proceeds will go to Cultural Survival, a global charity which advocates for Indigenous Peoples’ rights.READ MORE:15 Things You Probably Didn't Know About It's A SinHow You Can Champion LGBTQ+ Causes All Year LongThe Queer Clan Curiously Missing From Channel 4's It's A Sin
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It pains us to say it, but the four-day Easter weekend has lost some its appeal in 2021.True, we’re looking forward to an extended time of not having to worry about work, but with pub gardens not opening in the UK for a few more weeks, and visits to friends’ homes still out of the question, plans are very much weather-dependent.Still, if we do find ourselves indoors over the loooong Easter weekend, at least we can say that there are plenty of good films on TV – as well as some great new arrivals on streaming services – to keep us entertained while we tuck into our chocolate eggs.Here are our 20 of our top film recommendations for the next few days...Charlie And The Chocolate FactoryWhen’s it on? Friday at 9.55am on ITV2Tell me more: What better way to kick off Easter weekend than a film that centres almost entirely around chocolate?Tim Burton’s adaptation hones in some of the more sinister elements of Roald Dahl’s Charlie And The Chocolate Factory story – it is a bit weird that Willy Wonka is inviting all of these children into his workplace only to seriously injure and terrorise them, right? – but it is, thankfully for those with families to keep amused, still totally kid-friendly. Recommended for: When you need something to tide you over until 48 hours’ time when you can finally tear into your Easter chocolate.  Concrete CowboyWhen’s it on? Streaming on Netflix from Friday.Tell me more: This Netflix original is a modern-day Western about a teenager who’s sent to live with his estranged dad in Philadelphia, where he gets to know the local community of urban cowboys.Stranger Things star Caleb McLaughlin takes centre stage, while Idris Elba plays his father.Recommended for: Anyone for whom the thought of Idris Elba riding a horse sounds in any way appealing.King Of KingsWhen’s it on? Friday at 2pm on BBC TwoTell me more: Well it wouldn’t be the Easter weekend with some biblical epic airing on the BBC in the middle of the day. This year they’re showing King Of Kings, with Jeffrey Hunter in the lead role of Jesus and Rip Torn playing Judas.Clocking in at two hours and 48 minutes, it’s a bit of a bum-number, but it’s no The Greatest Story Ever Told, which goes on a total of four hours and 20 minutes.Recommended for: If there’s a 168 minute-sized hole in your Good Friday afternoon.The Sound Of MusicWhen’s it on? Friday at 5.45pm on BBC OneTell me more: Come for the dreamy blue skies and shots of the Austrian mountains, the comforting sight of Julie Andrews in her habit and family-friendly tunes like Do-Re-Mi, My Favourite Things and Sixteen Going Going On Seventeen.Stay for the surprisingly action-packed true story of a group of badass nuns helping the Von Trapp family escape the Nazis. And The Lonely Goatherd, obv.Recommended for: Literally everyone, there’s a reason this film has stood the test of time and still gets shown pretty much every time there’s a bank holiday.The Help When’s it on? Streaming on Disney+ from Friday.Tell me more: This star-studded film tells the story of two Black maids in 1960s Mississippi, who share their experiences of racism and workplace mistreatment with an aspiring white journalist.The Help has proved controversial, with many accusing the film of perpetuating a white saviour narrative, and Viola Davis later expressing regret over appearing in the film.While the subject matter and tone may be problematic, there are some fantastic performances from cast members like Viola, Emma Stone, Allison Janney, Cicely Tyson and Jessica Chastain, not to mention a scene-stealing role for Octavia Spencer, who won an Academy Award for her portrayal of Minny Jackson.Recommended for: Anyone who wants to see some incredible acting from a seriously A-list female-led ensemble cast.Death Becomes HerWhen’s it on? Streaming on Netflix from Thursday.Tell me more: Initially dismissed by critics upon its release almost 30 years ago, Death Becomes Her has since become a cult classic thanks to its oft-quoted one-liners and fabulously over-the-top performances from leading stars Meryl Streep and Goldie Hawn.The dark comedy sees the stars playing a pair of best friends obsessed with youth and one-upping one another, who stumble on the secret to eternal youth, with ridiculous consequences.Recommended for: Anyone who needs a bit of camp in their lives.ShrekWhen’s it on? Streaming on Netflix from Thursday.Tell me more: Long before the 500 sequels, various spin-offs and whatever that Shrek’s Adventure place on the South Bank is, there was Shrek.The CGI film turned every fairytale trope on its head, and did it in hilarious and – by animated family films’ standards – quite edgy fashion, and it definitely still stands up almost 20 years later. And when you’re done with it, the arguably-even-better follow-up Shrek 2 is also streaming now.Recommended for: People with children who need to be educated about the amazing pre-Frozen animated films of the early 2000s. BridesmaidsWhen’s it on? Friday at 9pm on ITV2.Tell me more: Bridesmaids is, quite simply, one of the funniest comedies of the past 10 years, if not the funniest.The recipient of two Oscar nominations (although it deserved way more, let’s be honest), the film follows the highs and lows of one woman in the lead-up to her best friend’s wedding, as she deals with her own break-up, a rival for her BFF’s attention and an especially nasty case of food poisoning. If you still haven’t watched Bridesmaids, now is absolutely the time to tune in.Recommended for: Anyone who’s spent their entire Good Friday watching family-friendly films and is in need of a good laugh at something less suitable for young viewers.Nanny McPheeWhen’s it on? Saturday at 1.10pm on ITV2Tell me more: Essentially the anti-Mary Poppins, Nanny McPhee sees the titular nanny arriving at a household in Victorian England to care for a family of seven children, who prove to be a handful for their widowed father.There’s no “spoonful of sugar” with Emma Thompson’s decidedly unglamorous character, though, who gets the children in line with some unusual disciplinary tactics. Oh, and magic, obv.Recommended for: People who need something to keep any children in your household entertained for a couple of hours.Mrs DoubtfireWhen’s it on? Saturday at 6.40pm on Film 4Tell me more: Undeniably a god-tier family comedy, Robin Williams’ performance in Mrs Doubtfire is a high-point in a career of high-points.The Oscar-winning star plays Daniel Hillard, who goes to extraordinary lengths to get close to his children after splitting up with their mother. Mrs Doubtfire packs in the laughs, as you’d expect from a Robin Williams film, but there’s also some real emotional scenes in this classic.Recommended for: When you fancy a bit of cosy nostalgia.Wonder WomanWhen’s it on? Saturday at 9pm on ITV2Tell me more: After being introduced was Wonder Woman in 2016′s Batman vs. Superman, this film saw Gal Gadot take the lead for the first time, exploring the iconic superhero’s origins.Suitably action-packed and full of nods to the original comic book character, Wonder Woman broke records upon its release and won mostly positive reviews from critics.Recommended for: Superhero fans who were disappointed not to get their usual cinema fix in 2020. BlacKkKlansmanWhen’s it on? Saturday at 9pm on Channel 4Tell me more: BlacKkKlansman is based on the memoir of the same name, which centres around Colorado Springs’ first African American police detective in the 1970s, as he plans to infiltrate a local chapter of the Ku Klux Klan, the white supremacist hate group.The film won praise for performances from actors John David Washington, Adam Driver and Laura Harrier, and finally won filmmaker Spike Lee his first Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay.Recommended for: Prestige film fans, for sure. Easter ParadeWhen’s it on? Sunday at 1pm on BBC TwoTell me more: This classic musical centres around an Easter-time romance (naturally), featuring signature songs Steppin’ Out With My Baby and, of course, Easter Parade.Easter Parade saw Fred Astaire coming out of retirement to appear opposite Judy Garland, and won an Academy Award the year after its 1948 release.Recommended for: With Judy Garland and Fred Astaire sharing the screen, this film is a must-watch for anyone with an interesting the so-called “golden era” of Hollywood.HopWhen’s it on? Sunday at 1.20pm on ITV2Tell me more: Very fitting for this time of year, Hop introduces us to E.B., an adorable young rabbit (voiced by Russell Brand, bizarrely enough), who doesn’t want to pursue the family business and become the Easter Bunny, instead dreaming of becoming a drummer.Mixing animation and live-action, look out for appearances from James Marsen, Kaley Cuoco, Chelsea Handler and some extremely cute chicks.Recommended for: Come on, who doesn’t fancy seeing a CGI bunny and some cute chicks bounding around on Easter Sunday?The Simpsons MovieWhen’s it on? Sunday at 3.40pm on Channel 4Tell me more: You’re familiar with The Simpsons, right? Well, after almost 20 years on our screens, the famous yellow family took over the big screen in 2007 with their first film.Many speculated how well a 20-minute animated comedy would transfer to a film, but The Simpsons Movie actually stands up pretty well. And while many remember this film mostly for Spider-Pig, “President Schwarzenegger” and that weird bit where Bart skateboards naked, it’s Julie Kavner’s at-times heartbreaking performance as Marge that stands out for us.Recommended for: Anyone who doesn’t mind having Homer Simpson’s “Spider-Pig” song stuck in their head for at least 24 hours after watching.Chitty Chitty Bang BangWhen’s it on? Sunday at 4.10pm on Channel 5Tell me more: A British bank holiday staple (Channel 5 literally showed it in pretty much the same timeslot last year), Chitty Chitty Bang Bang is, indeed, a “truly scrumptious” family musical guaranteed to put a smile on the face of anyone who loved it as a kid.Apart from when the Child Catcher is on screen, of course, who we still find legit terrifying long into adulthood.Recommended for: People who love a good old-fashioned family sing-a-long on a bank holiday.GreaseWhen’s it on? Sunday at 5.55pm on Channel 4Tell me more: Like, does he have a car?Realistically, we probably don’t need to tell you about Grease, so we’re just going to say that There Are Worse Things I Could Do is forever an underrated song, and we’re not looking forward to the inevitable discourse about whether or not the ending is problematic that crops up every single time this film is shown on TV.21 Jump StreetWhen’s it on? Sunday at 10.20pm on ITVTell me more: We’re not entirely sure how this “buddy cop action comedy” ended up on the bank holiday listings, but it’s an enjoyable enough watch, so we’re not mad at it.Based on the 80s TV show, 21 Jump Street sees Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum playing a pair of police officers who are forced to relive their high school years when they go undercover.Recommended for: When you’ve eaten too much Easter chocolate and you’re still on a sugar high, even at 10.20 at night.Sense And Sensibility When’s it on? Monday at 2.15pm on Channel 5Tell me more: Written by and starring Dame Emma Thompson, Sense And Sensibility was released during the Jane Austen renaissance of the mid-90s, around the time of the BBC’s much-loved Pride And Prejudice TV series and the big-screen version of Emma.Sense And Sensibility earned an impressive seven Oscar nominations, including a win for Best Adapted Screenplay.And can we please just talk about the cast for a second? Not only is Emma Thompson in the leading role, the film also boasts Kate Winslet, Alan Rickman the two Hughs (yes, Grant and Laurie) and Gemma Jones among its players.Recommended for: Those who love a good old-fashioned period drama to keep them entertained on a bank holiday Monday.Despicable MeWhen’s it on? Monday at 5.05pm on ITV2Tell me more: The film that introduced the world to the Minions... but please don’t hold that against it.Despicable Me proved to be a surprise hit upon its release in 2010, and has gone on to spawn a massive saga, including two sequels and an additional two prequels. Recommended for: Those in need of a distraction from the fact the long weekend is nearly over, and it’s back to work tomorrow. HuffPost may receive a share from purchases made via links on this page. Prices and availability subject to change. READ MORE:All The New Original Films Coming To Netflix In April 2021Change Over The Channel: Why Is Everyone Watching French TV Right Now?9 Of The Best Shows To Stream If You're Already Missing Drag Race UK
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Up to 1.8m people could lose access, warns select committee.
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Boris Johnson shows his drawing of a bunch of bananas during a visit to the Monkey Puzzle Nursery in Greenford, west London." src="https://img.huffingtonpost.com/asset/605d1bef250000011e1d96a2.jpg?cache=IGshTUa2jD&ops=scalefit_630_noupscale" />You’re reading The Waugh Zone, our daily politics briefing. Sign up now to get it by email in the evening.Thanks to Keir Starmer’s “constructive opposition”, there was no way Boris Johnson was going to lose the latest Commons vote on extending coronavirus restrictions for another six months.Yet the 76 MPs from different parties who did oppose the renewal of draconian powers were a reminder that our national consensus is fraying, and not just at the edges.As surreal as it sounded, Sir Charles Walker did us all a service with his extraordinary pint-of-milk speech (backed up by his Channel 4 News interview) on the basic liberties that are being sacrificed, however willingly, during this pandemic. Bringing a whole new meaning to the phrase lactose intolerance, the Tory backbencher’s protest was admirably random in its symbolism. Yes it was bizarre, but no more bizarre than the idea that it is illegal to leave the UK without permission or to kiss your grandma. Anything that jolts us into remembering just how abnormal our “new normal” has become has got to be worthwhile.And although the Tory rebellion (35 MPs defied the whip) was slightly smaller than previous ones on lockdown votes, other parties are starting to share their unease. It’s worth noting that the Lib Dems have rediscovered the “liberal” in their job description. Perhaps with one eye on the local elections, they not just voted against the Covid extension in the Commons but also tabled a “regret” motion in the Lords and triggered a vote there too. Labour’s own 21 rebels were pretty variegated. As well as the leftwing Zero Covid grouping, there were centrist MPs like John Spellar, Derek Twigg, Andrew Gwynne and Ben Bradshaw (who is particularly worried about the tourist and aviation trade being hammered) who voted against the renewal of powers. The PM had better hope this really is the last national lockdown because getting backing for a fourth one will be much more difficult politically.And as much as we like to think we’re all largely united on the pandemic, there are signs we are in fact pretty divided in key ways. I was particularly struck by the latest King’s College London/ipsosMORI study on public attitudes this week. It showed that we are even divided on how divided we think we are: some 38% think the pandemic has deepened divisions, while 35% believe it has brought people closer together.Nearly a third of the public (32%) say the past year has been similar to or *better* than average for them personally, while a majority (54%) say they’ll miss at least some aspects of the Covid-19 restrictions (like more family time and quieter roads). One in five (21%) say their finances are actually better than they would have been if the pandemic hadn’t happened.And yet today we also saw the latest poverty statistics released, and they revealed that child poverty hit a 12-year high even before the pandemic hit. New figures published alongside the poverty stats also showed for the first time the estimated level of “household food security”, with 1.1 million children “food insecure” in 2019/20, along with 1.7 million working-age adults and 100,000 pensioners. And that’s before the sticking plasters on free school meals and Universal Credit uplift are due to be ripped off the arms of the poorest later this year.Just as it’s important not to forget how abnormal current Covid curbs are on our liberties, it’s also vital that we don’t lose our sense of shock at these poverty figures. Child poverty is not inevitable, as the Blair government proved when it slashed the rates. Adults relying on foodbanks and children facing holiday hunger ought to be abnormal, not a commonplace greeted by a stoic shrug of the shoulders.Similarly, the health and economic inequalities laid bare by the pandemic should be seen as a catalyst for action to reduce them. Health minister Lord Bethell said on Thursday that “one of the reasons why we have been hit hard by the pandemic” is that “large parts of our population, simply aren’t in great shape at the moment, they have either poor health, poor living conditions, or poor circumstances”.Yet this was a minister of a party that has been in power not since 2019 but since 2010. The calculated amnesia of somehow projecting the Johnson administration as a brand new start, rather than the third in a line of Tory premierships, is the defining characteristic of his government. And for all the talk of “levelling up” there is as yet no strategy, no masterplan of policies drafted to reduce those health and other inequalities. As I mentioned earlier this week, it was striking how it was Chris Whitty, not Boris Johnson, making the link between the pandemic and deprivation in the latest No.10 press conference. Even before the virus hit our shores, “excess deaths” rose every year from 2012 to 2019 (see below).Only today, the Andrea Leadsom review of early years came up with recommendations for more “family hubs” where parents could better access services. Funnily enough there was a pretty good system of family hubs in place until 2010, they were called SureStart centres. And at least 500 have been closed over the past decade. For any government with a sense of shame, that ought to sting.With lighter nights and warmer temperatures beckoning, the challenge to remember how we got here is a constant one. Personal freedoms have been suspended during a year of Covid. But freedom from poverty and ill-health have been steadily lost over the past decade too. It’s a lot easier restoring the former than doing something serious about the latter.The PM has a clear route out of lockdown, but where’s his “roadmap” out of inequality? That’s the question he should constantly be reminded to answer.Related...An MP Will Protest Covid Restrictions By Carrying A Pint Of Milk Around LondonPub Owners Slam Boris Johnson's Vaccine Passports SuggestionBoris Johnson's Covid Press Conferences To Switch To £2.6m Media Room From Monday
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Chris Kamara tried out some “cow-cuddling” during Thursday’s edition of Steph’s Packed Lunch and… well… you can probably work out for yourself why that ended up being newsworthy.The football pundit made a trip to the UK’s first slaughter-free dairy in Rutland on Thursday afternoon, to try out what he described as “the latest craze”.As the name suggests, “cow-cuddling” sees people getting up close and personal with some new bovine pals, in what’s supposed to be a relaxing experience for both parties.That wasn’t quite how it went down for Kammy, though, with one of the cows in question displaying some behaviour that no one wants to see at lunchtime live on air.Speaking to Ian, one of the farmers, Kammy asked him to “tell me all about these beautiful beasts”, only for one of the cows to try and steal the limelight, blocking the camera completely.“Oh Rosie, right on cue!” Ian said, still completely hidden from view by Rosie. “This is Rosie, she loves a cuddle, we’ve been having a cuddle for the last 15 minutes.”Ian then tried to explain that cow-cuddling is “very much about relaxation”, but his point was quickly disproved, as he urged Kammy to “look out”.At that moment, Rosie then began having a big old poo, while presenter Steph McGovern could be heard laughing back in the studio. "Live TV, Steph!"Kammy got slightly more than he bargained for when he wanted to cuddle a cow! @chris_kammypic.twitter.com/avVaCX7ess— Steph's Packed Lunch (@PackedLunchC4) March 25, 2021Thinking on his feet, Kammy declared: “Pat on the back for me, I think. Excuse me! Oh dear, that’s live TV, Steph.”Undeterred by Rosie, he then asked if he could “have a go at cuddling” one of the resident animals… but perhaps wisely, tried it out with a somewhat more subdued cow.ITV’s daytime show This Morning suffered a rather similar blunder just a week ago, when a seal was seen urinating in the background of one live segment on the show.Steph’s Packed Lunch airs every day from 12.30pm on Channel 4.MORE DAYTIME:Miriam Margolyes Talking About Her Sex Tapes Is Even More Outrageous Than You ThinkITV Viewers Suspect Ant And Dec Are Behind Some Very Odd Moments On Lorraine And This MorningBen Shephard Leaves Susanna Reid Speechless With Mortifying 'Nipples' Blunder
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News that the Chinese government had locked down an entire city on January 23 last year was met around the world with shock, disbelief and unease.Wuhan lockdown!! The Chinese city of Wuhan where the #coronavirus outbreak started is having its public transport shut down! Underground trains, busses ferries etc will stop in an hour and a half. Also all flights, trains and long distance buses out of the city cancelled. #China— Stephen McDonell (@StephenMcDonell) January 23, 2020Seventeen people were dead and 571 were infected, prompting the communist government to cut the city of Wuhan off entirely in a move the World Health Organisation described as “unprecedented in public health history”. What had been unprecedented soon became the precedent. Just 60 days later Boris Johnson sat in front of the nation and told the UK to stay at home – where, aside from some brief moments of freedom, we have largely remained.In hindsight, it’s difficult to remember – but months of lockdown, the demise of socialising and the temporary end of foreign holidays didn’t initially seem to be a given even as the virus crept ever closer to UK shores.Those intervening days were marked only by fear and uncertainty that manifested in a number of ways.‘Stay calm’On February 1, Independent columnist James Moore felt compelled to write a piece on the worrying rise of racist attacks, particularly towards those from British Chinese communities.“A piece saying ‘let’s calm down and see how this thing goes’ was warranted given what people were saying and doing,” he tells HuffPost UK.“I defend what I wrote because while this obviously has turned into the big one, what inspired me to write that was the stuff I was seeing on social media and it was quite nasty.”He added: “The world has fundamentally changed – it’s been quite astonishing. We haven’t seen anything like this since 1919. “Anyone writing at the time – the world was a completely different place just a short year ago, completely different.”Moore was very wrong about one thing – the pandemic was a bit like Contagion, because that’s what Matt Hancock based the UK’s vaccine programme on. Speaking to ITV’s Good Morning Britain, he said: “I think the safest thing to say is Contagion wasn’t my only source of advice on this issue but I did watch the film – it is actually based on the advice of very serious epidemiologists.”Probably best to forget that in Contagion, nearly everyone died.‘How bad is coronavirus?’This was the question asked on February 11 by a certain news journalist on a certain news website. With hindsight, the answer was clearly “extremely bad”.Back then, however, we didn’t know that – and the responsible thing seemed to be to put the virus in context by comparing it with things like Ebola, Sars and seasonal flu.One line from the article reads: “Four more patients in England tested positive for coronavirus on Monday, bringing the total number of cases in the UK to eight, and two GP surgery branches in Brighton have been shut following an outbreak in the city.”Just weeks later, huge emergency Nightingale hospitals were being built to deal with the expected surge in patient numbers, and the collapse of the entire NHS was a real possibility.But at the time, the global Covid death toll was less than a tenth of the number who had died in the Ebola outbreak, and we felt it was important that people understood it in context. The figures today, tragically, are extremely different.‘It’s a strange relic of the past’Professor Karin Wahl-Jorgen isn’t talking about the under-fire royal family or Nigel Farage’s latest venture. She’s referring to an article she wrote on February 14 of last year.“The piece absolutely looks like something that was written in an entirely different universe,” the professor at Cardiff University’s school of journalism, media and culture tells HuffPost UK.In it, Professor Wahl-Jorgen laments the use in the media of phrases such as “killer virus”, “killer flu” and “deadly disease” to describe what was then a mysterious outbreak that had reached the UK but was yet to claim its first British victim.DAILY MIRROR: Killer Flu: 150’Brits in quarantine #TomorrowsPapersTodaypic.twitter.com/fv8WZpnGzY— Neil Henderson (@hendopolis) January 30, 2020It concludes: “The prominence of fear as a theme in reports of the coronavirus suggests that much of the coverage of the outbreak is more a reflection of public fear than informative of what is actually happening in terms of the spread of the virus.”Coronavirus made its front page debut in the UK on January 20 in the Financial Times, with a small piece on rising fears over the “Chinese virus”. “The number of cases has reached more than 200, with three deaths, since it was first suspected at the start of the year,” the piece read.Tuesday’s Financial Times: Downbeat IMF outlook diverts Davos focus from climate goals #TomorrowsPapersTodaypic.twitter.com/s7QeasawTX— Helena Wilkinson (@BBCHelena) January 20, 2020Eleven days later, the first cases were confirmed in the UK.Nearly a month later was the first reported death of a Brit, a man aboard the Diamond Princess cruise ship in Japan on February 28.Five days later, the first of over 125,000 deaths and counting on British soil – though it has since been established that UK citizens had been dying of the virus, initially unreported, since at least January 30.GUARDIAN: First coronavirus death in the UK #TomorrowsPapersTodaypic.twitter.com/kpWzygndCK— Neil Henderson (@hendopolis) March 5, 2020“I’ve spent a lot of time talking about that piece and how I changed my mind as time went on,” says Professor Karin Wahl-Jorgen. “It’s interesting to look back on how different everything appeared at the time.“It came from a perspective of being concerned about how media organisations are often irresponsible when they’re speculating about what might happen in the future.“They tend to project these kinds of worst-case scenarios often in a bid to take a more sensational angle or simply to get more clicks on stories.”MAIL: Is the killer virus here? Plus: Why do these lesser rent a royals always want more? #TomorrowsPapersTodaypic.twitter.com/DqPkfqjnHB— Neil Henderson (@hendopolis) January 23, 2020Unlike Sars and Mers, the hyperbolic reporting around Covid-19 turned out to be relatively accurate – but no one could have known that at the time.“I won’t say that I regret writing it because, on the basis of what we knew at that point, all the things I argued in that piece were certainly valid,” Prof Wahl-Jorgen says.“However, things changed so rapidly and the pandemic became this all-encompassing crisis defining everything we do in such a way that those kinds of concerns, they transformed into something else.”With this transformation came a curious change in language – the very thing Prof Wahl-Jorgen was worried about largely disappeared as phrases like “killer virus” vanished from front pages, even though that’s what it actually is.“My hunch is that as we have more specific information we can be more precise about it,” she says.“And the reality is extremely scary, but it’s not sensationalistic to point out that 100,000 people have died in the UK. That’s just a fact.”The eerily accurate prediction“Coronavirus looks like it won’t be contained.“It’s not horror movie, and it’s not Spanish Flu, but it is serious.”In hindsight, these words were the kind of calm and measured analysis we Brits should have expected from the government in February of last year as the increasingly serious coronavirus pandemic crept towards and then landed on our shores.Instead, a week after they were uttered, Boris Johnson stood in front of the nation and told us all that he “shook hands with everybody” while visiting a hospital treating patients infected with Covid-19.A year ago today, @vsmacdonald asked Boris Johnson for clarification on advice about shaking hands.The Prime Minister told her he had visited a hospital treating coronavirus patients the night before, where he "shook hands with everybody." pic.twitter.com/RLAIBxTE4R— Channel 4 News (@Channel4News) March 3, 2021So who did say it? That would be journalist James Ball in a tweet on February 25, not that he got any thanks for it, describing the feedback he received as “overwhelmingly negative”.“I think it was a mix of people not wanting it to be true and a suspicion of journalists being doom mongers or cheering on crises,” Ball tells HuffPost UK.“Which I don’t think we do but I can see why people think we do.”Coronavirus looks like it won’t be contained. If that’s the case, there’s a decent chance it means a majority (40-70%?) of us will get it, and at current rates 1-2% of those will die, if health systems hold up. It’s not horror movie, and it’s not Spanish Flu, but it is serious.— James Ball (@jamesrbuk) February 25, 2020Johnson’s now infamous remark was made just two days before the first announced death on British soil, and three weeks before he announced a national lockdown.“The government seemed behind on it,” says Ball. “That completely mad ‘I shook hands with everyone’ – I assume he meant to mean it in an ‘I was meeting the patients, not hiding in the sidelines’ kind of way.“But it just looks like he’s going around joking about being a super-spreader. It just looks so weird.”Don’t panicOver in the US, Steven Salzberg, professor of biomedical engineering at Johns Hopkins University, had a much better handle on things and wrote a piece listing the reasons why we should and shouldn’t panic.Despite being only February, Prof Salzberg was clear that although “we don’t know exactly how bad it will get”, vaccines, avoiding travel, self-isolation were the keys to avoiding the worst-case scenario.Unfortunately for us all, Prof Salzberg wasn’t in charge of our response. “The US government was extremely slow because Trump was in denial,” he tells HuffPost UK.“We unfortunately had a president who was completely in denial, completely ignorant of the science, and was being parroted by a lot of advisers, some of them who should have known better.“New Zealand was terrific, Japan and South Korea were loads better. The UK was kind of a mixed bag.“It seemed at first that Boris Johnson only took it seriously when he got sick so that seemed to really turn things around in the UK.”‘Shut for six weeks?’By the middle of March, the realisation coronavirus was going to significantly change our everyday lives was beginning to dawn on people.Johnson was finally taking things seriously and during a press conference on March 12, described the outbreak as “the worst public health crisis for a generation”.He added: “It is going to spread further and I must level with you, I must level with the British public: many more families are going to lose loved ones before their time.” Yet even with the dire warnings from the PM, the ramifications were still largely beyond comprehension. Journalist Jane Merrick, who was at that press briefing, pondered what life would be like if we had to “self-isolate/shut schools for six weeks”.chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty says: "if people go too early, they become very fatigued". Given we're looking at the peak in May, can you imagine now having to self-isolate/shut schools etc for six weeks?— Jane Merrick (@janemerrick23) March 12, 2020A year ago today I and a few dozen other journalists filed into a room in No10 to watch the PM, Vallance and Whitty give a press conference. This was when PM said he had to “level” with us, that many of us were going to lose loved ones. In hindsight, this thread is extraordinary https://t.co/AwNCy4JQtA— Jane Merrick (@janemerrick23) March 12, 2021And then it happened – lockdown. The scenario that just 60 days earlier had seemed almost beyond belief when the government of China implemented it was imposed on us all.Despite his insight, Prof Salzberg – like the rest of us – had no inkling we would still be in lockdown one year on.“I didn’t think it would last this long but I didn’t say that in the article because I didn’t have any data,” he says.“I thought, even if it’s bad, it won’t last as long as it has done.“But now we know.”And finally...Of course, not everyone was quite so accurate in their predictions of what coronavirus would bring.Former MEP Daniel Hannan’s optimistic take on impending events was to highlight how social distancing and the demise of handshaking could add a dash of Downton Abbey to our lives.Alas, Hannan did not respond to HuffPost UK’s request for comment, so we don’t know precisely how disappointed he is that these archaic forms of greeting haven’t quite caught on again.Related...Tory MPs Demand Boris Johnson Justify Extending 'Authoritarian' Lockdown Laws
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A male off-duty police officer convicted of assaulting a woman has been spared a jail sentence, prompting criticism about a system that “fails women”.PC Oliver Banfield, who serves with West Midlands Police, admitted a charge of assault by beating at a hearing in January.On Friday, he was handed a curfew and ordered to pay compensation and costs at Leicester Magistrates’ Court. He has been suspended by the force and an investigation is examining an allegation of gross misconduct.But there was dismay at the court’s decision. Labour MP and former cabinet minister Harriet Harman said that it showed the “system fails women and protects men”. Shocking CCTV footage of the incident has been obtained by Channel 4 News. The broadcaster also spoke to the victim, Emma Homer, who claimed she had to investigate the attack herself as she “wasn’t taken seriously”.In this C4 News exclusive footage, this is the moment police officer PC Oliver Banfield violently attacked a woman walking home at night in 2020.She faced an uphill battle to get justice from the police forces involved. pic.twitter.com/sJxGtffsLv— Channel 4 News (@Channel4News) March 19, 2021Banfield, 25, was given a 14-week curfew banning him from leaving his house between 7pm and 7am, and must pay £500 compensation together with a £95 victim surcharge and £85 court costs.The magistrates’ punishment comes as police officers come under scrutiny following the death of Sarah Everard.The footage shows Homer walking home alone after an evening out with friends when she was confronted by a man she had never met and tackled to the ground.Banfield, a probationary officer, put Homer in a headlock and dragged her across the pavement, yelling: “On the floor now, on the floor now.”The attack took place place close to Homer’s home in the Warwickshire village where she grew up. She says she is now too scared to walk the streets as Banfield lives around the corner. The woman heard on the footage trying to stop the attack is the police officer’s partner. Reacting to the sentence, Harman said on Twitter: “Policeman attacks woman walking home alone after dark.“Must have been terrifying for her but no prison sentence.“He continues in post. @WMPolice (West Midlands Police) must review.“This is proof, if any needed, that system fails women and protects men.”In a victim impact statement issued through a relative, Homer said the effects of the assault had left her with “anxiety, insomnia and stress” which had been “compounded by the slow response” from Warwickshire Police, the investigating force.She hit out at Warwickshire Police’s initial handling of her complaint after she was attacked by a “drunk” Banfield while walking home at about 1am on July 26 2020.She said that despite reporting the assault within hours of it happening, it took “more than 30 hours for an officer to take a telephone statement”, “nine days for an officer to come and see her” and “eight weeks for an officer to conduct house-to-house enquiries”.Homer told Channel 4 News: “He got me on the floor.  It was like he was pretending to be in a cop film, calling for back up, how an officer would arrest somebody, like he was in a film.“He got me on the floor, round the neck, screaming and shouting aggressively.“I had to investigate myself, I found out there was a police officer called ‘Oli’ who lived around the corner.“From the moment I reported the attack, I wasn’t taken seriously.”She added: “I’m ok but not ok, I’ve never experienced anxiety before, never really understood it to be honest, until now, it’s messed with me quite a bit.”The force has since personally apologised to Homer stating its “initial response to the report of the assault was not as swift as it should have been”.Homer added that when the Warwickshire force presented a case file to the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) in September 2020, it was decided not to charge Banfield.However, aided by the Women’s Justice Centre, Homer had the CPS’s decision reviewed and the CPS charged Banfield in December 2020.He admitted assault by beating in court at Leamington Spa in January this year.West Midlands Police said Banfield was “removed from public-facing duties after the assault” while a criminal investigation into the incident in Bidford-on-Avon was carried out by Warwickshire Police.His employer force said that following the end of the criminal investigation, Banfield was immediately suspended pending the outcome of a disciplinary process into an allegation of gross misconduct against the officer.West Midlands police and crime commissioner David Jamieson said it was “right that Oliver Banfield is now facing a gross misconduct investigation and has been suspended”.He has asked the force’s chief constable, Sir David Thompson, to brief him “on the steps taken by West Midlands Police”.Chief superintendent Ben Smith, of Warwickshire Police, said the force recognised “the strength of feeling that has come about as a result of Sarah Everard’s tragic death and understand the concerns relating to violence against women and girls nationally”.He added the police was “aware of the concerns” around its handling of the case, had carried out a review and “responded to the complainant”.He said: “We acknowledge that, due to internal process errors, the initial response to the report of the assault was not as swift as it should have been, and an apology has been issued with regards to this.“A proportionate investigation was then conducted, which ultimately led to the charge and prosecution of the perpetrator.”West Midlands district crown prosecutor Rachel Adams said: “The CPS takes violence against women and girls extremely seriously and will continue to robustly prosecute offences arising from this sort of behaviour.“I authorised a charge of assault by beating against Oliver Banfield after a referral under the victim’s right to review process, and I have personally engaged with the victim and her family throughout the proceedings.”Deputy chief constable Vanessa Jardine, of West Midlands Police, said: “Oliver Banfield was removed from public-facing police duties after the assault and while the investigation by Warwickshire Police was being carried out.“To protect the criminal case we’ve not been able to carry out our own misconduct investigation until its conclusion.“Now sentencing has taken place, our investigation will be carried out and Pc Banfield faces allegations of gross misconduct and is currently suspended.”She added: “We understand the strength of feeling surrounding the desperately sad death of Sarah Everard and concerns on the issue of women’s safety but it would not be appropriate for us to comment further at this stage.“Our role is to protect the public, who should be able to trust us. We therefore hold all our officers to the highest standards and we will take appropriate action against anyone whose actions fall below what is expected.”
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Our reports have been revised for market size, forecasts, and strategies to take on 2021 after the COVID-19 impact: https://www.thebusinessresearchcompany.com/global-market-reportsThe Toilet Roll Global Market Report 2020-30 by The Business Research Company describes and explains the global toilet roll market and covers 2015 to 2020, termed the historic period, and 2020 to 2025, termed the forecast period, along with further forecasts for the period 2025-2030.The report evaluates the market across each region and for the major economies within each region.The Toilet Roll Global Market Report 2021 covers toilet roll market drivers, toilet roll market trends, toilet roll market segments, toilet roll market growth rate, toilet roll market major players, and toilet roll market size.View Complete Report: https://www.thebusinessresearchcompany.com/report/toilet-roll-global-market-report-2020-30-covid-19-implications-and-growthThe toilet roll market report provides an in-depth analysis of the impact of COVID-19 on the global toilet roll industry, along with revised market numbers due to the effects of the coronavirus and the expected toilet roll market growth numbers 2021-2030.Toilet Roll Global Market Report 2021 is the most comprehensive report available on this market and will help gain a truly global perspective as it covers 60 geographies.The chapter on the impact of COVID-19 gives valuable insights on supply chain disruptions, logistical challenges, and other economic implications of the virus on the market.The chapter also covers markets which have been positively affected by the pandemic.Request For The Sample Now: https://www.thebusinessresearchcompany.com/sample.aspx?id=3027=smpThe global toilet roll market is expected to grow from $20.15 billion in 2020 to $21.37 billion in 2021 at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 6.1%.The toilet paper market is expected to reach $27.08 billion in 2025 at a CAGR of 6%.The report covers the toilet roll market segments-1) By Product: Pulp Paper, Recycled Paper.2) By Type: 1 Ply, 2 Ply, 3 Ply, Others.3) By Distribution Channel: Online Channel, Offline Channel.4) By End User: Household, Commercial.About The Business Research Company: The Business Research Company is a market research and intelligence firm that excels in company, market, and consumer research.It has over 200 research professionals at its offices in India, the UK and the US, as well a network of trained researchers globally.
It’s now been 20 years since the first episode of Celebrity Big Brother aired, and a reality TV behemoth was born.CBB would eventually run for 18 years and 22 series, becoming one of the UK’s most talked-about shows and paving the way for an endless stream of star-studded reality series including I’m A Celebrity… Get Me Out Of Here! and Strictly Come Dancing.But in March 2001, when Chantelle and Preston’s romance, Kim Woodburn’s outbursts and the notorious “David’s dead” saga were barely a glimmer in the distance, Celebrity Big Brother actually got off to a fairly modest start.The first series ran for just one week in aid of Comic Relief, with only six housemates taking part, none of whom received a fee.Among those early celebrity guinea pigs was TV presenter – and, let’s face it, low-key national treasure – Vanessa Feltz.Reflecting on CBB after 20 years, Vanessa admits she didn’t quite know what to expect when she received the phone call from Comic Relief co-founder Richard Curtis inviting her to join the line-up. And she certainly didn’t anticipate the commotion the show would end up causing.“I didn’t really think about it at all,” she tells HuffPost UK. “It was before anyone knew anything really about reality TV. There’d only ever been one series of non-celebrity Big Brother, and people weren’t so conversant with what any of it meant, or how the public would respond or anything.“It just didn’t seem like much of a big deal at the time. How wrong I was!”Vanessa says she didn’t really consider what she was letting herself in for – that is, until the day she was due to enter the Big Brother house, when things quickly began to sink in for her. I’d just been through a horrible divorce, and it was all quite hairy really. So I did suddenly think, ‘Blimey what the hell is this? What am I doing this for?’. “Before I actually got into the house, they insisted that they pick me up separately from my children, who were going to come and wave me off,” she recalls. “They had to be in separate cars, at separate times, and then they were kept far away, and I was kept sort of confined in a dressing room. It all just suddenly felt frighteningly real.“They also sent somebody over to inspect my luggage to make sure I wasn’t smuggling in any contraband. I wouldn’t even know what contraband to smuggle in!”She adds: “Also, I hadn’t ever left my kids before. I’d just been through a horrible divorce, and it was all quite hairy really. So I did suddenly think, ‘Blimey what the hell is this? What am I doing this for?’.”Eventually, she and boxer Chris Eubank, TV personality Anthea Turner, Boyzone singer Keith Duffy, soap star Claire Sweeney and eventual winner Jack Dee made it into the house, which was situated in East London in those early years.She was finally evicted after three nights, but it sounds like that was more than enough.“It was ghastly, to be honest with you,” she admits. “On the first day, you went in, the door slammed behind you and it was kind of a bit pantomime, but it was also slightly nerve-wracking and a bit intimidating.“It was kind of weird, but it wasn’t deeply unsettling until it got to the bit of nominating – which had to happen on the first day, because we were there for such a short time. Basically, we went in through the door, made lunch, washed up and then pretty much the nominations happened.”That initial round of nominations saw Chris Eubank and Anthea Turner facing the first public vote of the series after 24 hours in the house, something which Vanessa remembers the Blue Peter presenter did not take well. Anthea Turner began crying, pretty pitifully. And it wasn’t at all funny – not at all funny. She recalls: “Anthea Turner began crying, pretty pitifully. And it wasn’t at all funny – not at all funny. “First of all, because we’d made a woman of however old she was in those days cry in public, which is hideous. But also there are cameras watching you doing it, which is even worse.“Big Brother was something that I thought might be quite light-hearted, kind of like the Comic Relief documentaries you’d seen before… and suddenly, there was Anthea Turner sobbing. And so, it just suddenly went sour very, very fast.”Following Anthea’s upset, Vanessa says several of the housemates made the decision they wouldn’t nominate anyone for the rest of the series.“They were like, ‘if it’s going to make people cry I don’t want any part of it, I’d rather draw lots or something like that’,” Vanessa says. “So I was summoned by Big Brother and told, ‘Vanessa, look, people absolutely have to nominate, so you have to make them, you have to explain that it’s part of the format and if they don’t the whole thing’s ruined’.“So I trotted back, and said, “look, we really have got to nominate, and I know it’s not nice, but I’ve just been told it’ll all be ruined if we don’t, and it is for charity’. And it was all really distressing. And that was day one. It all just got worse from there, really.” Chris Eubank eventually became the first housemate to be evicted, after which Vanessa and Jack Dee were swiftly put up for the next public vote.“It had to be me!” she says. “You couldn’t nominate Anthea, could you? And then you couldn’t nominate Keith Duffy or Claire Sweeney because they weren’t really that well-known, and they were young and fragrant and innocent and lovely. She was trying to stand out from Brookside and he was trying to stand out from Boyzone.”Shortly after this came Vanessa’s most notorious moment in the house – involving chalk, a leopard print dressing gown and some rather fruity language.It’s a scene that’s been brought up countless times in the last two decades, but exactly what did go on?“Not much really,” Vanessa explains. “We’d been given some chalk and a piece of blackboard or something for a task, and I was finding it pretty boring in there, and also pretty dreary. “So when Big Brother said, ‘give the chalk back’, I just thought, ‘well, I won’t, I’ll just keep it’. And Big Brother said, ‘no, Vanessa, immediately hand back the chalk’, and I just suddenly thought, ‘there’s no such thing as Big Brother, it’s some kind of junior production assistant, so why should I? I don’t have to do what Big Brother tells me to do, this is absurd’, so I just said ‘oh fuck off’.” Following this, Vanessa began writing words like “incarcerated”, “ambushed” and “restricted” on the table, to the apparent concern of her housemates (and, of course, the millions watching at home).She says of the incident: “I don’t know what the hell was going through my mind. I think I was feeling upset about being evicted and worried that I’d be terribly unpopular when I came out. “And then I started to think, ‘the earliest I can possibly leave here is tomorrow night’, which was about 36 hours in the future, and I thought, ‘well I’ve had enough and I’d really like to go home now, I’m sick of it’. And then all sorts happened, and I was told ‘if you do leave, you’ll be deeply unpopular’ and ‘you can’t go’, and then I was weeping and sobbing.”And then?“And then I snapped out of it because I’m a grown up. But I had a few hours where I felt thoroughly miserable, I must admit,” Vanessa reveals.“It definitely wasn’t a nervous breakdown or anything like that,” she insists. “Because I was perfectly fine a few hours later, and perfectly fine when I came out the day after. I think nervous breakdowns normally last a little longer than three and a half poignant hours.“But I did get quite low, I did get fed up. I wasn’t enjoying it… I’d just been through a divorce, I’d just lost my mum, I was in quite a vulnerable state. Probably these days they might have said, ‘you know, Vanessa, this isn’t a good year for you to do it’. But back then there was such naivety around that sort of thing that I just don’t think they even realised.“I don’t think it was malicious, I just think they didn’t really know what the potential was – for Anthea to start crying, for me to start falling apart – particularly in a show that only lasted for seven days, didn’t involve any money and was for charity!” To me, it was three hours of being a bit miserable and slightly tearful. For all we knew no one at all was watching. Vanessa’s behaviour ended up generating a lot of conversation – and headlines – on the outside world, unbeknown to the woman herself who, along with her housemates, had no idea whether anyone at home was even watching them.She reveals: “I was astounded when I came out and saw the level of reaction to it. To me, it was three hours of being a bit miserable and slightly tearful, but I didn’t know it was going to be translated into a massively big deal.“There hadn’t yet been this given about reality TV, with everybody saying ‘ah yes, reality TV is taking over’. For all we knew no one at all was watching.”Vanessa left the house on day four to what she describes as an “absolute furore”.“I like to think that I was the absolute pioneer of that genre,” she jokes. “Because now you can’t see a single reality show without a celebrity crying, weeping, gnashing their teeth, revealing some kind of tragedy about their past or just generally their neuroses or some kind of sexual proclivity. It’s hard to remember now that it had never been done until I did it.“So I take very proud of ownership of my pivotal role in broadcasting history in that regard, because without me cracking up, think of all the crack ups you would have been unable to see in the future – and how terrible your life would have been as a result. “I’m still waiting to be made a dame of the British empire, I don’t know what the delay is, really.”Celebrity Big Brother did follow Vanessa around long after that first series came to an end, not that she seemed to mind.“It always gave me something to talk about at dinner parties.“I was in Celebrity Big Brother for three nights – before that, I’d been doing The Vanessa Show five days a week for years, I’d been on The Big Breakfast every morning and doing Value For Money on the BBC.“But as soon as Big Brother happened, every time I walked in anyway or came on any show as a guest, they’d always play the Big Brother signature tune. And I was on for three nights!“I won Television Moment Of The Year that year – and it was one of those moments where at the time I had no idea whatsoever that it would even feature in the programme! I didn’t know, in inverted commas, ‘me cracking up’ was going to be the focus and content of an entire show, I had no idea at all, and I remain a little surprised even after all these years.”“I certainly didn’t think that 20 years later I was still going to be asked about it!” she adds with a laugh. “But certainly for memorable moments, it’s endured! It really has.”Vanessa remembers that reaction from the public was – perhaps surprisingly – mostly positive, with Channel 4 even assigning her a security guard for six weeks “not because people were trying to attack me, but because they were trying to come and kiss me and cuddle me and all that kind of thing”.“I think I got 7000 letters from members of the public, and had to pay somebody to answer them,” Vanessa says. “They were really, really nice – they said things like ‘oh we’re so sorry you were so upset, why don’t you come and live in our back bedroom?’. Which is very unexpected and very kind. I might still come, if the bedroom’s still available.”On the 20th anniversary of the very first Celebrity Big Brother, Vanessa maintains she has no regrets about her involvement in the show.“I didn’t like it when I was in there, but it was three nights in total,” she explains. “So as soon as those three nights were up, I never regretted it.“And I maintain to this very day, that if you don’t say it or do it, it won’t be on film. So don’t say and do it if you don’t want them to show it, and if they do show it, don’t blame anyone but yourself.”MORE NOSTALGIA:'I Thought No One Would Watch It': Craig Phillips On Winning The First Ever Big BrotherHere's What The Stars Of Popstars Have Been Up To In The 20 Years Since The Show Debuted‘Kraftwerk Invented Atomic Kitten’: The Untold Tale Of The British Girl Group’s Rocky Road To A No.1 Hit
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Fans of 90s Saturday night TV might spot a familiar face among the new civilian contestants getting ready to enter The Circle. It’s been confirmed that James Crossley – aka Hunter from Gladiators – will be taking part in the Channel 4 gameshow, which sees players communicating and competing with each other through a social media platform to win £100,000. James was one of the most popular athletes on ITV’s Gladiators, which originally aired from 1992 to 2000. The hit show saw members of the public taking on athletes and bodybuilders in a series of physical challenges, and was hosted by John Fashanu, Jeremy Guscott and Ulrika Jonsson, who James also dated. James will now be entering The Circle, which sees contestants able to adopt a ‘catfish’ persona to help them win the game, and he will be playing a nurse called Gemma. Players live in separate flats in the same block, but never actually meet face-to-face until they are ‘blocked’ from the game. If he wins, James says he wants to use the prize money to give back to the NHS.  “I’ve always been somebody who’s enjoyed different challenges, I started off bodybuilding and then I went into Gladiators. After that I went into acting and competing in strongman,” he says. “Most of the challenges I’ve done have been quite body crushing. I think The Circle will be an interesting challenge to try and get away with playing somebody else, it uses different muscles to what I’m used to.“I also really want to take this opportunity to give back to NHS nurses, winning the prize money would give me the chance to show my gratitude for all their hard work.”Among the other players entering the famous block of flats include a social media influencer masquerading as his uncle and a father-daughter duo playing a letting agent. The Circle is currently airing a special celebrity series on Channel 4 in aid of Stand Up To Cancer, with players including Denise Van Outen, Lady Leshurr and Charlotte Crosby. The Circle’s third civilian series begins on Tuesday at 9.15pm on Channel 4. READ MORE:The Circle Announces Full List Of Celebrity Catfish And We Can't Wait To See How This Turns Out
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Piers Morgan’s walk-off on Good Morning Britain was one of the biggest talking points of the week, so it was only natural the Gogglebox gang would be giving their verdict on Friday night. And sure enough, they all had plenty to say about Piers’ tantrum, which came just hours before it was announced he would be leaving the programme. The presenter walked off the ITV breakfast show on Tuesday after a row with weather presenter Alex Beresford over Piers’ repeated criticisms of Meghan Markle, following her US TV interview with Oprah Winfrey. The Gogglebox families watched the drama unfold as part of Friday’s edition of the hit Channel 4 show, and they were all on Alex’s side.  As Mica Ven and her partner Marcus Luther watched Piers try to stop Alex from speaking, she said: “He usually does the weather, let him speak man.”“Alex is ready to rip in to him, you know,” Marcus predicted. Tom Malone added of Piers: “Shut up a minute, let somebody else have a word.”As Piers then stormed off the set, Pete Sandiford joked: “I didn’t know you could let fireworks off at half six in the morning... I don’t get why he’s walked off because that’s just not him at all. His sister Sophie commented: “He’s just had his arse handed to him on national TV by the weatherman.”Tom said: “Good, get gone. Shut the door behind him.”Marcus added: “This is amazing what Meghan and Harry story has done to the bloody world man. Everyone is tripping. I love it!”ITV faced calls to reprimand Piers after Monday’s show, when he cast doubt on Meghan Markle’s recent claims about her mental health and her experiences of racism after joining the Royal Family.“I’m sorry, I don’t believe a word she says,” Piers said. “I wouldn’t believe her if she read me a weather report, and the fact that she’s fired up this onslaught against our royal family, I think is contemptible.”It was later revealed Piers had sparked more than 41,000 complaints to Ofcom, after which it was announced he was leaving GMB effective immediately.It was confirmed on Friday that Meghan also issued a formal complaint to the broadcasting regulator, following reports she had also contacted ITV over the matter, concerned about the affect his words would have on others who are struggling with their mental health. Piers was also criticised by mental health charity Mind, who work with ITV on its Britain Get Talking initiative. Gogglebox airs Fridays at 9pm on Channel 4. Useful websites and helplinesMind, open Monday to Friday, 9am-6pm on 0300 123 3393.Samaritans offers a listening service which is open 24 hours a day, on 116 123 (UK and ROI - this number is FREE to call and will not appear on your phone bill).CALM (the Campaign Against Living Miserably) offer a helpline open 5pm-midnight, 365 days a year, on 0800 58 58 58, and a webchat service.The Mix is a free support service for people under 25. Call 0808 808 4994 or email [email protected] Mental Illness offers practical help through its advice line which can be reached on 0808 801 0525 (Monday to Friday 10am-4pm). More info can be found on rethink.org.READ MORE:Piers Morgan Blames 'Cancel Culture' For Good Morning Britain ExitHow Piers Morgan Could Be Back On TV Pretty SoonAlex Beresford Says He Didn't Want Piers Morgan To Quit Good Morning Britain
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Sick of your sheets being stolen and incessant snoring from your partner? It might be time to consider a “sleep divorce.”For many of us, getting a good night’s rest is a nightly challenge ― and the pandemic has only made things worse. A Kaiser Family Foundation study found that 36% reported difficulty sleeping due to pandemic stress.As much as you love cuddle time with your other half, the last thing you need when you finally doze off is to be woken up by the bright light of their iPad or an errant arm hitting your face.Sleeping in separate beds or rooms is more and more sounding like a dream for some couples ― especially if you’re working from home together, said Wendy Troxel, a senior behavioural and social Scientist at the RAND Corporation and author of “Sharing the Covers: Every Couple’s Guide to Better Sleep.”“Given the extra ‘togetherness’ we have been sharing with our family during extended stay-at-home orders, sleeping apart, at least temporarily, during Covid may also benefit some couples who are just feeling starved for some alone time,” she told HuffPost. “The key, though, is making this decision as a couple and to make it clear that the decision is for the benefit of your relationship, not a sign of abandonment,” she said.Jennifer Colbourne, a Ph.D. student in Austria who studies tool use in cockatoos (but not their sleeping habits, alas), is among the married people currently going it alone come bedtime.She and her husband often live apart for stretches of time when Colbourne is collecting data. When she came back from one such research trip in the middle of the pandemic, the pair struggled to sleep side by side in a small double bed.“In all fairness, we have a particularly bad situation, because I have several sleep disorders,” Colbourne told HuffPost. “I no longer sleepwalk or scream in my sleep now that I have a CPAP machine to treat my sleep apnea, but I still have restless leg syndrome and I still thrash, moan and steal blankets.”“My spouse, on the other hand, is a very light sleeper and struggles with insomnia. It’s a lethal combination!” she joked. They recently moved to a new place and decided to start sleeping in separate beds. Now they’re both resting more soundly.“To be honest, our relationship is the best it’s ever been in the 10 years we’ve been married,” she said. “There’s a stigma to sleeping separate, but being tired and resentful of your partner can’t be good for your relationship. Finding that balance of being independent but still needing each other without being codependent is a fine line to walk, and I think having your own personal space can help with that.”Indeed, research shows when you are well-rested, you’re a better communicator, happier and more empathic ― all important attributes in developing and sustaining healthy, long-lasting relationships. If you can swing an extra bed or extra room, sleeping separately is a pretty sweet deal, Troxel said.“There are are just times when strategically, it makes sense for a couple to ‘divide and conquer’ by sleeping apart, so at least one partner gets some much needed shut-eye,” she said.For example, she said, for sleep-deprived parents of newborns, “giving each partner an occasional break to spend the night in a separate room while the other parent takes on infant caregiving duties for the night is a great way to ensure that both parents don’t become chronically sleep-deprived.”Sleeping a la Lucy and Ricky Ricardo can also be beneficial if you and your partner have different sleep cycles, said Jennifer Adams, the author of “Sleeping Apart Not Falling Apart.”That was one of the major reasons Adams and her husband decided to sleep in separate rooms. Her husband is an earlier riser, while Adams is a night owl.“I would head to bed and want to read when he was asleep and had to get up early in the morning for his job and then when he wakes in the morning, gets up and dressed, and ready for work, he would wake me,” she recounted.In their waking hours, both were left with guilt and some residual resentment ― which is actually a common experience among co-sleepers. A 2013 study from the University of California, Berkeley found that one partner’s restless night caused by disturbances from the other partner can lead to conflicts in the relationship the next day. Another study showed that sleep issues and relationship problems tend to crop up simultaneously.“The reality is, your sleep cycle is hard-wired,” Adams said. “It’s incredibly difficult to change your inbuilt sleep rhythms to satisfy those of another person.”This whole “sleep separation” pitch sounds promising, but let’s turn to the question on everyone’s mind: What about sex? Does sleeping in separate rooms or beds put a damper on a couple’s sex life?Not at all, said Raquel Fuqua, a Colorado woman who decided to “sleep divorce” her boyfriend over the summer due to some pretty incompatible sleep habits. (He sleeps diagonally and punches and kicks through the night. She sleep-talks and kicks, too. It’s all very MMA, but unwittingly-in-your-sleep MMA.)“I think sleeping apart allows us to decide when we want to cuddle ― we just get into the other’s bed,” she said. “Sleeping in separate beds has increased and improved our sex lives.” If anything, the nightly absence makes the heart grow fonder.“We do wake up missing each other because you’re not rubbing up on them all night,” Fuqua said. “It makes you crave physical affection a little more, especially in the mornings. We both work opposite work schedules so this works for us.”Sujay Kansagra, an associate professor at Duke University Medical Center and sleep health expert for Mattress Firm, said that there’s no need for intimacy to take a hit because of arrangements like this.“Really, beds should be used for only two things — sleep and sex,” he said. “When you walk into your bedroom, your mind should start focusing on sleep or intimacy and not on things like work or watching TV.”If you recognise that, it can help maintain intimacy as a priority in the bedroom, should you go forward with a “sleep divorce,” Kansagra said.For couples who aren’t interested in a sleep divorce but want to improve their co-sleeping regimen, syncing up their sleep schedules can positively impact their intimacy. (Granted, this advice isn’t too helpful for people working different work schedules.)“If you can make this adjustment, some great activities for couples to engage in that will help sync their sleep routines include drinking herbal tea to relax, massages and being intimate,” Kansagra said.Whatever tweaks you make to your bedroom regimen ― sleeping separately, syncing up schedules ― make sure that you explicitly communicate your relationship expectations and boundaries with your partner, Adams said.“If you’re sleeping separately because you need your sleep, your partner should, and probably will, understand. We all need sleep,” she said. “If you are sleeping separately to escape your partner each night, you probably need to read a different article.”Related...11 Empowering Reads, Recommended by Women-Owned Bookshops7 Little Things You Can Do When You're Feeling Pandemic BurnoutStop Asking If My Throuple Is FeministHow You Can Champion LGBTQ+ Causes All Year Long15 Things You Probably Didn't Know About It's A Sin
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After the socially-distanced Golden Globes got 2021′s awards season off to an unusual start, it’s now time for the biggest names from the past year in music to have their efforts recognised, because the Grammys are here.Like the Globes, the Grammys will be markedly different to make it as safe as possible, with no studio audience and multiple stages, with each artist having their own backstage area, so they don’t need to make unnecessary contact with anyone.Thankfully, something we can still look forward to is an array of performances from A-list stars like Billie Eilish, Harry Styles, Cardi B, Dua Lipa, BTS, Taylor Swift and Megan Thee Stallion.It’s all happening in California on Sunday night, but here’s how we Brits can get in on the fun… The red carpet action is kicking off a little earlier than usualReliable as ever, E! is at hand to bring you two hours of red carpet coverage. Because the Grammys is an American show, it all happens at fairly unsociable hours for those of us in the UK, but this year’s red carpet show kicks off at 10pm on Sunday 14 March.That means even if you don’t feel like staying up until the wee small hours for the main show (it is a school night, after all) you can probably squeeze in an hour or two of red carpet fun before bed. But how can we watch the Grammys main show in the UK?Well, as ever with these US ceremonies, this is where things do get a bit more complicated. The show will be broadcast live on CBS in the US, but if you want to watch it live here in Blighty… we’re afraid you’re out of luck, as there’s no way of legally watching the Grammys as they happen. If you feel like staying up anyway, we’ll be covering the action as it plays out, so get following HuffPost UK on Twitter now so you don’t miss out.In recent years, 4Music has shown the Grammys in full the following Monday evening. We’ve checked their listings, and there’s no signs of the Grammys there this time around, but we’ve contacted Channel 4 for comment, just in case that changes.READ MORE:Lewis Capaldi Has Some Fun On The Red Carpet As He Makes His Grammys DebutYes, Nick Jonas Had Something In His Teeth During Grammys: 'I Eat My Greens'The Saturdays' Mollie King Was The Grammys' Most Unexpected Guest
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Tougher rules are being introduced to make appliances such as fridges, washing machines and TVs cheaper to run and last longer, the government said.New legislation aims to tackle “premature obsolescence” in electrical goods – short lifespans built into appliances by manufacturers so customers have to buy new ones sooner – and make them more energy efficient. Ministers confirmed that from the summer, consumers will have a ‘right to repair’ on goods they buy.The rules include a legal requirement on manufacturers to make spare parts available to consumers, which aims to extend the lifespan of products by up to 10 years, and cut carbon emissions from the manufacture of new goods.The measures, which apply to white goods such as washing machines, dishwashers and fridges, as well as items such as TVs, aim to reduce the 1.5 million tonnes of electrical waste the UK generates a year.Higher energy efficiency standards are also being set for electrical goods, which officials said would save consumers an average of £75 a year on bills overall and cut carbon emissions by using less electricity over their lifetimes.Business and Energy Secretary, Kwasi Kwarteng, said: “Our plans to tighten product standards will ensure more of our electrical goods can be fixed rather than thrown on the scrap heap, putting more money back in the pockets of consumers whilst protecting the environment.“Going forward, our energy efficiency framework will push electrical products to use even less energy and material resources, saving people money on their bills and reducing carbon emissions as we work to reach net zero by 2050.”New energy labels have also been introduced to simplify the ratings which had got to the point where most products were classed as A+, A++ or A+++ because of improvements in energy efficiency since the standards were first introduced. The simplified system is based on an A-G scale, with the bar raised for each grade so very few appliances will be classed in the top A standard.The new regulations, which the Business Department aims to bring into force in the summer, reflect what was agreed by the UK as an EU member state two years ago. They will apply in Great Britain, while EU rules will continue to apply in Northern Ireland.A call for evidence, which explored the scope for introducing more ambitious climate-friendly policy for electrical appliances after Brexit, will also feed into a forthcoming policy framework, officials said.Related...Worth The Faff Or Too Much Hassle? We Reviewed 6 Craft Kits15 Things You Probably Didn't Know About It's A SinHow To Get Your 'Spark' Back If You've Completely Lost Your MojoHere's Why We Love Looking At Pictures Of The Sky So Much
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In the 16 years it’s been on air, the BBC celebrity ancestry series Who Do You Think You Are? has delivered surprise after surprise, as famous faces discover mind-blowing facts about their distant relatives.Who could forget when Sir Matthew Pinsent found out he was technically related to Adam and Eve, or – perhaps the show’s most famous revelation – when Danny Dyer worked out he is actually descended from royalty. Before filming begins, a team of researchers spend hours and hours looking into a whole host of stars’ family backgrounds before deciding whose are the most compelling to feature. Unfortunately, not everyone’s family history is quite TV-worthy, and that means there’s a whole lot of celebrities who haven’t made the cut for the show. Here are 10 of the stars who have spoken publicly about having their Who Do You Think They Are? stories rejected...Dermot O’Leary The X Factor presenter joked that he didn’t think the production team tried hard enough when researching his family history, as he is adamant there are plenty of interesting details to be found.  He told parenting podcast Sweat, Snot And Tears: “They actually researched my family for about three months. They came back and said: ‘There’s just not enough interesting stuff about your family’.“Wexford is a port town, and my family are all seafaring folk. I have it on good authority that two of them went to America. One of them was a police officer and the other was a judge and they both got killed by the Mafia in the 30s.“They couldn’t find any record of this. I was like, ‘What are you on about? We’ve been everywhere, we’re a family of sailors’. I just don’t think they were trying hard enough. It’s awful, isn’t it? Absolutely awful.”Steph McGovernThe Packed Lunch presenter said she “never heard” from Who Do You Think You Are? producers again after an initial meeting with them, leaving her to assume her family were not interesting enough. Speaking on her Channel 4 chat show, she said: “A few of my friends have said that too, and we all think our families must be boring.”Michael PortilloThe former politician was approached by the show about taking part, only to then be rejected.Recalling a meeting with bosses during an appearance on The Steph Show, he said: “I told this story about my father. So, they said, ‘you’ve told that story already’.”Sir Tom JonesThe music legend said his show wasn’t commissioned as there was no “controversy” in his family. He told the Daily Star: “I think they looked at my family tree and they said, ‘Well they were all farmers’. I said, ‘Yeah I suppose they were’.“There’s no controversy in it. They were all workers, apparently. They were all normal people.”Richard OsmanThe Pointless quiz expert wrote on Twitter: “I was researched for Who Do You Think They Are? but they found nothing exciting.”Richard admitted he didn’t have high expectations about what might be uncovered, but joked he was hoping he may be related to a pirate.He tweeted: “I wasn’t expecting royalty but I was hoping there might at least be a pirate or two.”Michael Parkinson The former chat show host admitted he was “gutted” when he was dropped from the show. He told Radio Times in 2009: “When Who Do You Think You Are? called and asked if I was interested, I said I would be delighted, but warned that my own research had unearthed nothing of note. ’Oh, they all say that, but we always find something,’ they said.“Six weeks later, they phoned to apologise. My story was so boring they had to cancel the entire project. I was gutted.”Eamonn Holmes Following Danny Dyer’s revelations about his royal ancestry, Eamonn shared his failed bid to appear on the show during a discussion with wife Ruth Langsford on This Morning. He explained: “They interviewed me for two days and got all this documentation from me. But they never, ever got back to me.” Eamon saw the funny side, though, joking that he comes from “a very boring family” to which Ruth agreed: “Very dull.”Stephen Mangan According to a Mail On Sunday report in 2018 (via the Independent), the Extras actor was rejected after the production team discovered that his family all hail from the same place in Ireland, meaning that there was little to explore on the show. Cherie BlairThe barrister and author, who is married to the former prime minister Tony Blair, was “thrilled” when she was approached to take part on Who Do You Think You Are?, but she was left needing to do her own research into her ancestry when her story was not commissioned. She told the Daily Mail in 2014: “After some investigation, they decided not to go ahead because my ancestors weren’t very interesting. I guess I’ll just have to do the research myself one day.”Christopher Eccleston The former Doctor Who star was a lot more scathing about the show when they rejected his family story for the show. He told the Sunday Mirror in 2019: “It says everything that the project went nowhere. They tugged aside the leaves on those branches and concluded, ‘Nothing to see here’. “Generations of working-class people dismissed. Individuals with their own hopes, dreams and stories. Not army generals, industrialists, vaudeville singers, but factory workers, farm labourers, cleaners, nothing in any way ‘sexy’ enough for TV.”READ MORE:Ruth Jones Surprised To Discover Her Grandfather's Pivotal Role In The Creation Of The NHSShirley Ballas Details ‘Heartbreaking’ ‘Who Do You Think You Are?’ DiscoveryAnita Rani Reveals How 'Who Do You Think You Are?' Empowered Her And 'Changed Her Life'
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