Recognizing new paradigm in automotive sheet steel performance PROVIDENCE, R.I.– BUSINESS WIRE –May 20, 2016– NanoSteel , a leader in nanostructured steel materials, and the company s joint development launch partner, AK Steel Corporation, have won the Platts Global Metals Breakthrough Solution of the Year Award.This award is in recognition of NanoSteel s advanced automotive sheet-produced by AK Steel-which brings the combination of both high strength and high formability to automotive lightweighting.Our material also provides all the benefits of steel, making it more cost-effective than alternative metals and easier to integrate into a supply chain and parts manufacturing footprint that has successfully produced steel automotive components for more than 100 years.This multi-year partnership between two innovative companies is uniquely positioned to advance steel s leadership in vehicle lightweighting.The Company s primary focus is proprietary alloys for use as sheet steel in automotive lightweighting applications.Founded as a spinoff of the U.S. Department of Energy s Idaho National Laboratory in 2002, NanoSteel has developed multiple generations of ferrous materials innovations including metallic coatings, additive manufacturing powders, and sheet steel protected by over 300 patents filed and/or granted worldwide.
While the world s fastest lens may seem like a title reserved for big name brands like Nikon, Canon, or Sony, a relatively unknown company recently announced what s considered the fastest 35mm full-frame lens for DSLRs.Kerlee is produced by Shenzhen Dongzheng, or DZO Optics, a 10-year-old company based in China.With 11 lens elements in 10 groups, the lens can focus as close as one foot from the front.The lens also uses ED coatings to help minimize color distortion.The lens is a bit large for a prime wide angle, weighing in at about 24 ounces 690 and accepting 72mm filters.Smaller companies like ZY Optics and Laowa have taken a similar approach, introducing fast primes to entice photographers away from the comfort of big-name manufacturers.
Indeed, lens makers go to great pains to develop coatings that reduce the effects of flare, and lens hoods are designed to prevent flare-inducing stray light from striking the front element.But in this tutorial we're going to use lens flare to our advantage for a creative portrait.Lens flare is caused by light bouncing around in the lens barrel as it is reflected off the various glass elements inside the lens.It is most commonly seen on bright days when the sun is in the shot, where it manifests itself as bright, colourful rings that radiate from the light source, or, if the sun is just out of the frame it can make the entire shot look hazy, flooding the image with a soft, bright light that reduces contrast and leaves the shot looking washed out.Although lens flare is usually considered undesirable, it can be used to enhance images with creative effects, either in an abstract and overpowering style for some unusual shots, or subtly to add a faint, soft, romantic glow to your portraits, ideal for spring and summer shoots.To balance exposures when using such strong backlighting, try using a reflector to fill in some of the shadows and brighten up your subject, thus enabling you to capture an exposure that darkens brighter skies and keeps the cloud textures from blowing out.
Importantly, this super-repellent surface works with polypropylene, a common plastic that s used to package food and other consumer products.Surface coatings already exist to help food pour of their containers, but as Bhushan pointed out in a press statement, Compared to soaps, getting ketchup out of a bottle is trivial.At the same time, any solution would also have to be environmentally friendly and cheap.Surfaces that repel liquids with low surface tension are called superoleophobic, and they actually exist in nature the lotus leaf being a good example .These tiny structures look like shaggy, heart-shaped pillows, but they re hard as glass.When soap or oil come into contact with a coating embedded with these nanoparticles their molecules can t fall in between the resulting branches.
You might remember the ketchup video that lit up the Internet a couple years ago: an anonymous hand tipping a glass bottle of ketchup, which slid out with nary a streak of red.And the physics of slippery surfaces could be far more revolutionary than a trick for saving a few ounces of condiment.But in a world of super slippery coatings, the very concept of cleaning goes away.Startups like SLIPS Technologies and LiquiGlide, the latter of which made the viral ketchup video, are now branching out into the world of industrial applications.Or bacteria building up a slimy layer in IV lines.The problem is you can t take a solid surface and make it perfectly smooth on a molecular level, says Daniel Behr, CEO of SLIPS Technologies.
Professional portrait photographers may favour top-money lenses such as the Canon EF 85mm f/1.2 or Nikon 85mm f/1.4G, but with both costing over £1,200 $1,450 or AU$1,800 , they can be pretty pricey for most of us to justify.The first thing to consider is focal length.One particular advantage of using an 85mm lens for portraiture is that the short telephoto focal length has the effect of slightly compressing any prominent facial features think noses and chins for a bit of added flattery.The lens's 'bokeh' is all-importantThis is the quality of defocused areas within the image, and the aim is to produce a smooth and creamy-looking blur effect.When shooting at anything other than a wide-open aperture, one thing that helps with this is for the lens to feature a well-rounded diaphragm.
Epoxies date back to the 1930s, when a Swiss researcher was experimenting with materials to use in making dentures.Since then, these versatile compounds have served as adhesives, coatings, and structural resins in everything from surfboards to airplane frames—wherever toughness and durability really matter.J-B Weld adhesive was invented by a truck mechanic as an alternative to torch welding, but this staple of DIY toolkits and Car Talk punch lines will form an industrial-strength bond on many surfaces.The resin in J-B Weld epoxy is bisphenol-A yep, that BPA combined with garlicky-smelling epichlorohydrin.Chemically, the molecule is a chain with little carbon-and-oxygen triangles, called epoxide rings, on the ends.It s added to the resin for body and viscosity, without which the goop would be too fluid to adhere and set properly—more like J-B Melt.
A potential revolution in the packaging industry is perhaps on the way, one that might see today's masses of slightly unnecessary plastic that covers every food we buy replaced by a safer, natural alternative that's even edible.The development has been claimed by the US Department of Agriculture, which says that it's managed to create a usable form of plastic replacement using a protein usually found in milk.And not only is it degradable and edible, it's less porous than plastic, meaning the things it wraps might be kept fresher for longer.Wrap yourself in it before bed to live forever.Laetitia Bonnaillie, co-author of the discovery's paper, said: "The coatings applications for this product are endless.We are currently testing applications such as single-serve, edible food wrappers.
A potential revolution in the packaging industry is perhaps on the way, one that might see today's masses of slightly unnecessary plastic that covers every food we buy replaced by a safer, natural alternative that's even edible.The development has been claimed by the US Department of Agriculture, which says that it's managed to create a usable form of plastic replacement using a protein usually found in milk.And not only is it degradable and edible, it's less porous than plastic, meaning the things it wraps might be kept fresher for longer.Wrap yourself in it before bed to live forever.Laetitia Bonnaillie, co-author of the discovery's paper, said: "The coatings applications for this product are endless.We are currently testing applications such as single-serve, edible food wrappers.
Japanese optics manufacturer Tamron is hoping to show the world that third-party lens manufacturers can keep up with the big names in the industry.Much as Sigma has done with its Global Vision lens series, Tamron has released an onslaught of its award-winning SP lenses, and it continues to crank them out.The latest in the series is its brand new SP 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro lens designed for Sony s A-mount camera system, following behind the already-released Canon and Nikon editions.The design of this lens is inherited from Tamron s previous macro lens, but improves upon the design with more specialized glass elements.Constructed of 14 elements in 11 groups, the SP 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro lens includes one low dispersion LD and two extra low dispersion XLD elements for keeping chromatic aberrations and light dispersion to a minimum.It s not only the glass that s specialized either.
The Scout TK brings most of the functionality of a high-end thermal monocular to a friendlier price point.So when I picked up FLIR s newest entry-level thermal imager, the Scout TK, I was a little unsure how best to go about testing it.As it turns out, though, there is a surprisingly long list of things thermal vision is good for, even if not all of them are quite as exciting as being an international super spy.As FLIR s entry-level monocular, the Scout TK is built with simplicity in mind.It s incredibly easy to use, with just four buttons for power, screen brightness, camera, and color palette.Users can select from nine palettes that change how the Scout TK displays heat information, including White Hot, Black Hot, and various other options that highlight hot subjects with different colors.
These screen cleaning cloths from iCloth currently average 4.5 out of 5 stars from over 700 people read reviews and its list price is currently discounted 25% to $28.12 for a pack of 150, individually packaged.The aerospace-grade soft fabric wipes are made from high quality and extremely low-linting Dupont Sontara fabric, and are premoistened with a purified water-based formula containing a isopropyl alcohol not harmful ethyl alcohol and proprietary ingredients that are safe on all sensitive optics and specialty coatings.So they are ideal for tablets, smartphones and laptops, but will work equally well on your sensitive eyewear.iCloth wipes are made in America, and come with a money-back-guarantee if you're not satisfied.See the discounted 150-pack now on Amazon.
These screen cleaning cloths from iCloth currently average 4.5 out of 5 stars from over 700 people read reviews and its list price is currently discounted 25% to $28.12 for a pack of 150, individually packaged.The aerospace-grade soft fabric wipes are made from high quality and extremely low-linting Dupont Sontara fabric, and are premoistened with a purified water-based formula containing a isopropyl alcohol not harmful ethyl alcohol and proprietary ingredients that are safe on all sensitive optics and specialty coatings.So they are ideal for tablets, smartphones and laptops, but will work equally well on your sensitive eyewear.iCloth wipes are made in America, and come with a money-back-guarantee if you're not satisfied.See the discounted 150-pack now on Amazon.
If you re looking to install new solar panels in your home, why not consider those created by the aptly-named SolarWindow Technologies, which transform regular windows into solar panels that are up to 50 times more efficient than the regular photovoltaics you d attach to a roof?Just pick up your cell phone, look at the face without any power or image, and you ll see a pretty good example of what today s thin film looks like, John Conklin, CEO of SolarWindow, told Digital Trends.It s heavy, it s too dark to see through, and most thin-film is not flexible.This is where SolarWindow comes into play.As the term regular windows suggests, users don t have to replace the existing windows in their home, but need only treat them with a special process developed by the company.We apply liquid coatings to glass and plastic surfaces at ambient pressure, and dry these coatings at low temperature to produce transparent films, Conklin continued.
Elephone S7 is about to be released during September so the company is stepping on the gas with the PR surrounding it.Today we have a video trying to compare the back cover of this phone with the Samsung S7 Edge.There is surely some similarity, but Elephone still claim their design is unique and under different angle of light I can change colors.They are comparing it to the aurora effect.The back cover is made using the IMF technology, which should be the reason for the uniqueness.So what exactly that means?It s actually not the complicated, it s a PVC shell with 15 composite materials layers.These layers consists for example of the color layers, several optical coatings, 3D lithography, optical glue and antireflex coating.So check out the following comparison video and maybe you will see it too.
Apple made a big deal out of its newly-waterproof iPhone 7 in an event broadcast around the world this week.But it could already be out of date, as Australian engineers have just announced the discovery of a new spray-on material that has remarkable water-repellant qualities.While there are a bunch of super-hydrophobic coatings on the market, they tend not to last for very long.But the new coating, developed by a team led by William Wong at the Australian National University's Research School of Engineering, combines two plastics, one flexible and one tough, making it substantially more robust."It's like two interwoven fishing nets, made of different materials," Wong said.There are two ways to make it, both cheaper and easier than current manufacturing processes.
The US Fish and Wildlife Service estimates about 750 million birds perish annually flying into glass façades, which can be hard to distinguish from open airspace.Guy Maxwell, an architect at New York-based Ennead Architects, is on a mission to mitigate this fowl holocaust.A bird lover his entire life, he first became aware of architecture s deadly impact on avifauna 15 years ago, shortly after the completion of his firm s Rose Center for Earth and Space at NYC s American Museum of Natural History.The enormous glass cube afforded unimpeded views of the spherical Hayden Planetarium within, but was a deadly invisible barrier to birds.Working with him is an informal circle of anti-collision advocates that includes members of the American Bird Conservancy, New York City Audubon, New Jersey Audubon, and the Bird Safe Glass Foundation.It really takes a gang of merry pranksters to pull this off, says Maxwell.
Engineers have developed a new technique that could pave the way for splash-free urinals in the future.When drops of liquid hit a hard surface at a high-speed, the impact distorts the liquid s structure and it bounces back.The rebound motion of liquid can sometimes be unpleasant or even dangerous, and can certainly result in higher cleaning fees.But, splashes could be a thing of the past as a paper published in Physical Review Letters paywalled reveals a surprisingly easy method that could prevent unwanted splashes - coat the surface with something soft.Professor Alfonso Castrejón-Pita, lead-author of the research and engineer at the University of Oxford, said he was motivated to study splash dynamics as no one had actually studied systematically what happens when droplets hit soft substrates.So, Castrejón-Pita and his team set about painstakingly analysing the 100,000 shots taken by recording splashing alcohol droplets with a high-speed camera.
What would silicon-based life be like?A new protein might help us find outSilicon is the second most abundant element in Earth s crust, but it doesn t naturally bond to carbon.That means manufacturers must turn to artificial methods to make compounds combining the two, which are called organosilicons and feature in materials including adhesives and silicone coatings.But until now, scientists have been unable to find or produce such a reaction in nature.The team created it using a process of artificial selection called directed evolution, and it outperforms all other existing methods of bonding the two elements.
What would silicon-based life be like?A new protein might help us find outSilicon is the second most abundant element in Earth s crust, but it doesn t naturally bond to carbon.That means manufacturers must turn to artificial methods to make compounds combining the two, which are called organosilicons and feature in materials including adhesives and silicone coatings.But until now, scientists have been unable to find or produce such a reaction in nature.The team created it using a process of artificial selection called directed evolution, and it outperforms all other existing methods of bonding the two elements.
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