Like penicillin, the microwave, velcro, and so on.Now there's been another potentially world-changing event discovered by pure chance: a method of easily and cheaply turning carbon dioxide into ethanol fuel.Scientists from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory discovered the process, which requires nitrogen, applied voltage, and spikes of carbon embedded with copper nanoparticles.The team was in what they thought would be the first of many steps needed to convert CO2 into methanol, before discovering it was converting he gas into ethanol by itself.The conversion process essentially reverses the effects of combustion, with the nanotech catalyst forcing the carbon dioxide to dissolve in water and transform into ethanol.The reaction produces small amounts of several products, but the yield of ethanol was 63-65 per cent.
Like penicillin, the microwave, velcro, and so on.Now there's been another potentially world-changing event discovered by pure chance: a method of easily and cheaply turning carbon dioxide into ethanol fuel.Scientists from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory discovered the process, which requires nitrogen, applied voltage, and spikes of carbon embedded with copper nanoparticles.The team was in what they thought would be the first of many steps needed to convert CO2 into methanol, before discovering it was converting he gas into ethanol by itself.The conversion process essentially reverses the effects of combustion, with the nanotech catalyst forcing the carbon dioxide to dissolve in water and transform into ethanol.The reaction produces small amounts of several products, but the yield of ethanol was 63-65 per cent.
Oak Ridge National Laboratory scientists from the United states in Tennessee have managed to transform carbon dioxide etanoliksi a surprisingly simple way, the Engadget report.the researchers were pre-assumed that the carbon modification etanoliksi require a multi-step reaction chain and several of a catalyst.through the Process to export the enough, only one catalyst.This catalyst is based on piilevy, which is copper, and carbon consisting of nanosized spikes.Each peak from the is nanopisarat nitrogen.When this entity is exposed to carbon dioxide gas and a small electrical current, it produces a chain reaction, the result of which is liquid ethanol.
Scientists at the Department of Energy s Oak Ridge National Laboratory developed an electrochemical process that uses tiny spikes of carbon and copper to turn CO2 into the fuel.In particular, the team used a catalyst made of carbon, copper and nitrogen and applied voltage to trigger a complicated chemical reaction that essentially reverses the combustion process.With the help of this catalyst, the solution of carbon dioxide dissolved in water and turned into ethanol.Typically, this type of electrochemical reaction results in a mix of several different products in small amounts.We discovered somewhat by accident that this material worked, said ORNL s Adam Rondinone, lead author of the team s study published in ChemistrySelect.We were trying to study the first step of a proposed reaction when we realised that the catalyst was doing the entire reaction on its own.
National Laboratory Scientists in Tennessee claim that, somewhat serendipitously,The researchers, who work at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, developed a process that adds "nano-spikes" — essentially tiny bursts — of carbon and copper to CO2 to transform it into ethanol, the type of alcohol found in handEthanol can also be turned into fuel — gasoline in Brazil
How interesting that you'd say that, GavinBT's chief exec Gavin Patterson has claimed an Openreach split would make future UK broadband investments more challenging and increase the firm's already-ballooning pension deficit.Contrary to claims that its TV arm has siphoned off broadband investment cash, a diversified business has made the case for investment easier, he said."Ultimately you have to be able to make investments over long periods.. if you are only looking at the wholesale, Openreach side, then some of these investments are going to be a more challenging business case to make."He said the pension deficit is running into billions, with some people saying it could now be as high £10bn.The comments come as the regulator Ofcom decides whether to act on its preferred option to make Openreach a legally separate company from BT – with its own independent board, or push ahead with full structural separation.
From the Big Bang and radioactivity to microwaves and penicillin, history is full of serendipitous discoveries.Earlier this week, scientists at the US Department of Energy announced an accidental breakthrough of their own – a simple way to turn CO2 into fuel.After devising a long-winded reverse-combustion process, the team realised that the first stage of the reaction turned the gas into ethanol, a useful fuel.We re taking carbon dioxide, a waste product of combustion, and we re pushing that combustion reaction backwards with very high selectivity to a useful fuel, said Adam Rondinone, lead author of the study.Ethanol was a surprise – it s extremely difficult to go straight from carbon dioxide to ethanol with a single catalyst, Rondinone added.The catalyst s hidden weapon is a nanoscale structure made of copper nanoparticles on carbon spikes.
UK.gov 'working with fibre providers to find a solution'Digital minister Matt Hancock has said pure fibre and 5G are the priority for Blighty's digital infrastructure over the next decade - but has indicated the government won't be paying for it.Speaking at the Broadband World Forum event today, he said by 2020 the volume of global internet traffic would be 95 times what it is now.To paraphrase Al Gore: the last thing any of us wants is to end up as road kill on the information superhighway."Hancock said our current part-fibre, part-copper infrastructure has brought superfast connectivity to the majority of the country, with 95 per cent of the country to have 24mbps next year.He said: "New entrants have shown a full-fibre solution can be economic," citing the Gigabit City project in York, and companies such as Gigaclear bringing fibre to the Cotswolds.
Scientists at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have accidentally discovered a process by which they are able to convert the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide into ethanol that can be used for fuel.The electrochemical process uses tiny spikes of carbon and copper in the conversion process.In addition to the carbon and copper, the process also requires nitrogen and an applied voltage.We discovered somewhat by accident that this material worked, said ORNL s Adam Rondinone, lead author of the team s study published in ChemistrySelect.We were trying to study the first step of a proposed reaction when we realized that the catalyst was doing the entire reaction on its own.The chemical reaction that takes place is very complicated and is said to essentially reverse the combustion process.
Matt Hancock MP pledges 5G and fibre roll-out as BT CEO calls for end to Openreach debate.The UK digital and culture minister Matt Hancock signalled a new phase in the Government s broadband strategy as he announced plans to bring about ubiquitous 5G and fibre over the next ten years.Hancock, who took the position over from Ed Vaizey in July, outlined the approach at Broadband World Forum, including a plan to introduce universal connectivity and to produce a more competitive market.The destination of this journey must be to push connectivity as far out as it will go, said Hancock.He described three main tenets to the plan: completing the roll-out of current technologies such as 4G and superfast broadband, deploying deeper connectivity in areas of deep need and working to roll out more advanced technologies such as 5G and fibre.On the fibre aspect, Hancock said that fibre was the underpinning of a digital nation , and ultimately other technologies such as copper technology G.fast would not provide the necessary connectivity.
Swisscom reckons it's become the first carrier in the world to announce a G.fast service.The telco hasn't said how long the rollout will take, nor how many households are within its preferred maximum copper run of 200 metres, but its CTO Heinz Herren told an audience at Broadband World Forum BWF the build has commenced.Its canned statement says that beginning last month, it has only installed G.fast-compatible kit.Currently, it's installing nodes that serve 16 households at a time, but Swisscom anticipates support in 48-port units, and that will let it expand the rollout to fibre-to-the-basement FTTB deployments.The company reckons it gets up to 500 Mbps speeds on its G.fast infrastructure which has been in design and pilot for four years .The rollout is expected to reach two-thirds of the country's nearly 3.4 million households.
Switzerland is the first country in Europe to deliver so-called ultrafast broadband to customers through traditional copper infrastructure, according to service provider Swisscom.It said 1,000 customers were now using a G.fast connection, which can reach speeds of 500Mbps.G.fast lets copper cables carry data at faster speeds than before.In the UK, BT's Openreach has been trialling G.fast technology, but customers can not yet buy packages.Openreach has been installing the fibre optic cables that facilitate superfast broadband across the UK, but has so far focused on connecting street cabinets rather than homes.For most broadband customers, the internet is still piped from the exchange into homes via the copper network.
Announced last month during the company's annual SSD Global Summit, Samsung's next generation solid state drives are poised to become must-haves among enthusiasts.The 960 Pro that we are reviewing today succeeds what was already a fast drive with last year's award-winning 950 Pro.Samsung tells us that the 2TB drive will come with a five-year warranty and coverage for up to 1.2 petabytes written, whichever occurs first, while the 1TB model is good for 800 terabytes written and 400 terabytes for the 512GB model, both of which are backed by the same five-year warranty.With real estate at a premium here, Samsung has innovated by stacking DRAM on top of the controller to free up PCB space for a total of four NAND packages.One such step was to include a small copper film heatspreader on the back side which is estimated by Samsung to improve thermal performance by around 30%.Improved power efficiency also helps address this issue and is probably the biggest factor at play here.
BT hopes 40Gbps FTTP trials will show it is investing in future networks and can meet demand for ultrafast broadbandBT says it has completed a European first trial of advanced fibre to the premise FTTP technology that it calms can deliver 40Gbps and 10Gbps connections on the same fibre cable.The company has been testing Huawei s 40Gbps NG-PON2 , 10GBps XGS-PON and 2.5Gbps GPON between its Adastral Park R facility in Suffolk and the University of Suffolk in Ipswich.BT claims the development will influence the future deployments of FTTP networks but also demonstrates how existing infrastructure can be futureproofed against the anticipated growth in demand.Read More: Openreach CEO says it s time to go from superfast to ultrafastFibre optic quantum cryptography light asharkyu Shutterstock
Placating fibre fetishists has nbn in a twist and distracts us from bigger issuesnbn , the organisation building and operating Australia's National Broadband Network NBN , has announced trials of fibre-to-the-curb and broadband-over-copper technology XG-fast that hit 8Gbps on 30 metres of copper in lab trials, and 5Gbps peak aggregate speed being achieved over 70 metres of twisted-pair copper .Which is lovely, but also confusing because nbn has previously argued that gigabit-per-second speeds just aren't necessary and won't be for the foreseeable future.nbn CEO advanced the gigabit-just-isn't-needed argument at his March 2016 charm offensive.The Register understands his position was developed after visiting telcos around the world and finding none saw demand for gigabit services in the foreseeable future.Since Morrow's remarks, Google has killed its fibre-to-the-premises effort, citing low take-up rates.
For business broadband services though, price is not the only thing to consider.Speaking of which, it is worth shopping around and bearing in mind that, like for the consumer market, there might be some hidden costs.Feature sets may change over time, all prices tend to be VAT exclusive, speeds will vary, fibre broadband is not available in all post codes and the cost of line rental is often left out although that is changing .When applying for new broadband deals, make sure you're not already signed up to a contract you can't get out of - most business broadband contracts are 24-month terms.We opted for fibre broadband rather than full copper lines because, frankly, the cost between the two is minimal given the performance difference.Now let's get to the best business broadband deals in no particular order.
Approximately 29 million premises are expected to be connected to a fixed-line broadband connection enabled by G.fast technology by 2021, according to a report from Ovum.G.fast uses copper lines along with fibre to deliver speeds of up to 500Mbps with little extra deployment cost which is proving to be appealing with operators.Ovum's report – commissioned by Australia's National Broadband Network (NBN) and BT – predicts Europe will be ahead of the curve in G.fast adoption with major European operators showing interest and conducting trials.Initial deployments are expected to deliver speeds of around 300Mbps before a boost up to 500Mbps later on – both of which represent speeds far higher than most consumers are used to.The other commissioner of the report, NBN, has entered the second phase of their G.fast adoption strategy after conducting lab tests and their own small field trials.There is strong international competition to rollout G.fast with CenturyLink in the US, Chunghwa in Taiwan, and Bezeq in Israel all now conducting much larger field trials.
The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission ACCC is keeping its eye on wholesale ADSL services, at least while construction of the National Broadband Network NBN continues.The regulator announced on Friday that it would maintain regulation of the service, with its declaration paper noting that even Telstra broadly supported maintaining the declaration of the service.When a service is "declared" by the ACCC it regulates its price, availability, and/or contract terms.The regulator does so in order to level the playing field in a market where one or more players have a structural advantage.With Telstra being the only game in town for telephone exchanges it's not hard to see why the ACCC may be interested in setting some rules, notwithstanding other carrier's ability to put their own infrastructure into those exchanges.Telstra had tried to get the declaration lifted for exchange areas where there are multiple providers, but the ACCC declined.
2-Pack USB LED String Lights Multiple Colors , $5 with code OULHJUE6Anyone who comes here often knows we see a lot of deals on copper string lights, but $5 really is an insanely great price for two 60-LED strands.Just note that these are USB-powered, so you ll need some form of USB charger to power them up.Plus, promo code OULHJUE6 should work on all four colors.Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale.Click here to learn more, and don t forget to sign up for our email newsletter.
2-Pack USB LED String Lights Multiple Colors , $5 with code OULHJUE6Anyone who comes here often knows we see a lot of deals on copper string lights, but $5 really is an insanely great price for two 60-LED strands.Just note that these are USB-powered, so you ll need some form of USB charger to power them up.Plus, promo code OULHJUE6 should work on all four colors.Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale.Click here to learn more, and don t forget to sign up for our email newsletter.
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