However, fibre is not always practical or affordable to roll out and there are other technologies that could bring the connectivity.Fibre, for its part, allows effectively unlimited speeds.CBR looks at the alternative technologies to fibre and the role they could play in bringing ultrafast connectivity in the future.5G is the next generation of cellular connectivity technology that will follow 4G, which is now widely available in modern day smartphones.Since 5G will provide the backbone for the Internet of Things IoT , 5G is supposed to provide low latency, so that devices running on it will be able to be constantly connected and be highly energy-efficient, so that devices using it can survive on batteries for a large amount of time without being recharged.The specifications for 5G have not been agreed upon yet, but one of the main expectations is that it will be able to transmit data very quickly.
Big news in Apple land this week is the arrival of Thunderbolt 3 on the new MacBook Pro, but there s more reason to be interested in the high-speed, highly-flexible port than simply because you re an Apple fan.Initially, Intel expected it to use optical fiber – in fact, it was originally called Light Peak – but switched to more conventional copper cables before launch.The original Thunderbolt standard supported up to 10 Gbit/sec per channel.In late 2013, Thunderbolt 2 arrived: it could pair two such channels together into a single data pipe – otherwise known as channel aggregation – with a maximum bandwidth of 20 Gbit/s.With the arrival of the new MacBook Pro this week, macOS users will have as many as four Thunderbolt 3 ports to play with.It s not been entirely welcomed with open arms, however, given Apple s decision also marked the retirement of existing connectors like USB 3.1, HDMI, and MagSafe 2.
We have an incredible lineup with global product launches, incredible speakers, engaging demos and the clash of ideas about the future of Europe.The two-day conference preceded by a two-day Hackathon, grab tickets here , kicks off on December 5 in the former Olympic Village s Copper Box Arena, and wraps the following day with the Startup Battlefield finals where one startup will take home £30,000 in cash.Deep learning legend Dr. Michael Lynch will talk about the future of AI and investing.The founder of hot London startup Citymapper, Azmat Yusuf, will discuss what is on the horizon for his company.For starters, you may have seen robots wandering around in the U.S. Marc Raibert, CEO and Founder of Boston Dynamics, is flying in from the States to show off his company s latest walking robots.There will be no shortage of discussion about Brexit s impact on the European tech scene.
With few exceptions, virtually every solid material expands when it is heated up.However, a new research project from researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of Southern California want to buck the trend.What we tried to achieve was to build a material structure that would shrink when you heat it and expand when you cool it down, Nicholas Fang, an associate professor of mechanical engineering at MIT, told Digital Trends.To achieve this, Fang and his colleagues created tiny, 3D-printed star-shaped structures — around the size of a single sugar cube — which rapidly shrink when subjected to extreme temperatures of 540-degrees Fahrenheit.These metamaterials were fabricated using interconnecting beams of a slow-to-expand material containing copper, and more elasticized, rapid-expanding polymer substance.While the crazy, natural world-inverting properties of material are interesting from a research perspective, however, what Fang and others are most interested in is the possible heat-proofing abilities of the material, which can withstand notable shifts in temperature without expanding.
Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, the person considered to be the world's first microbiologist, was born on this day in 1632.Throughout his career he sent more than 560 letters to the Royal Society and is credited with a vast number of discoveries, from the sperm cell to a rare disease that involves incessant hiccuping.Van Leeuwenhoek, whose microscope could magnify the users' vision by nearly 300 times, has been honoured with a Google Doodle on the 384th anniversary of his birth.His lenses were characterised by silver or copper frames with an optical zoom of 275 times normal vision.The biggest microscope was about 5cm long and was held very close to the researchers eye while facing into the sun.Despite numerous attempts, it wasn't until 1957 that someone was able to recreate his method.
The electromagnetic waves emitted by strikes move in concentric circles that are rarely parallel to the ground.So current systems - ground-based antennas that locate strikes using radio waves - underestimate the number of flashes, fail to record weak strikes and can't process data fast enough to solve the real problem: predicting a storm.Vienna-based weather service provider UBIMET is hoping to fix this.It has a system that measures lightning at a third of a millionth of a second, using five ground-based antennas to detect the electrical discharge of a strike.Once lightning hits, the electromagnetic waves travel through two copper coils at right angles, inducing a current.This is then registered by an embedded device, transferred to UBIMET's central processing unit and transmitted to meteorologists or paying companies within 30 seconds.
Batteries are something most of us use every day, but few of us really know much about where they come from.If you re a DIYer, the evolution of components is an important facet of understanding how they work, and over at Adafruit, they ve taken the time to teach just that in a quick video.Adafruit s Collin walks through the battery s beginning as a set of capacitors used to store voltage through its more modern usage as a container of cells where stored energy is converted into electricity.He then shows off how to build your voltaic pile using copper, zinc, and salt water so you can better understand how it works.It s a clever combination of history and practical knowledge, and if you ve ever been curious about the history of the battery, it s a great starting point.
Swiss telco launches ultrafast broadband capable of 500Mbps that includes the use of humble copper linesSwisscom is claiming to be the first European country to launch a commercial ultra-fast broadband service for its citizens using a combination of fibre and traditional copper lines.BT last year achieved speeds of 5Gbps using a copper connection in early lab trials of G.Fast, and claimed the tests show the technology is futureproof against future customer demands.The former British incumbent has already promised to deliver G.Fast to ten million homes and businesses by the end of 2020 and to the majority of the UK by 2025.But its European counterpart, Swisscom announced earlier this week that it has launched a commercial service after a four year project phase, and it already has 1,000 customers.It has teamed up with Huawei in testing the service and has now started to apply it across Switzerland as part of the regular Fibre to the Street FTTS expansion.
Cymas Solar-Powered Globe String Lights, $9 with code M75FT93Z Cymas 33' Copper String Lights, $10 with code L7P3NA4EStop me if you ve heard this before, but we ve got two new deals on LED string lights today.$9 gets you a strand with 30 solar powered globe-style bulbs, or you can opt for a standard 33' copper strand for $10.Just be sure to note the promo codes below.Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale.Click here to learn more, and don t forget to sign up for our email newsletter.
Cymas Solar-Powered Globe String Lights, $9 with code M75FT93Z Cymas 33' Copper String Lights, $10 with code L7P3NA4EStop me if you ve heard this before, but we ve got two new deals on LED string lights today.$9 gets you a strand with 30 solar powered globe-style bulbs, or you can opt for a standard 33' copper strand for $10.Just be sure to note the promo codes below.Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale.Click here to learn more, and don t forget to sign up for our email newsletter.
The scientists were originally trying to convert carbon dioxide into methanol and didn t think the catalyst they were using was capable of converting it to ethanol instead.Photo: YouTube/Oak Ridge National LaboratoryIn a serendipitous accident, scientists in Tennessee claim they have converted carbon dioxide into ethanol.The researchers, who work at the Department of Energy s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, developed a process that adds nano-spikes essentially tiny bursts of carbon and copper to CO2 to transform it into ethanol, the type of alcohol found in hand sanitiser and alcoholic drinks.Ethanol can also be turned into fuel gasoline in Brazil already contains more than 25 per cent ethanol , which is why the scientists are calling the discovery a twist to waste-to-fuel technology.The carbon nanoparticles seen above as circles combine with carbon nano-spikes to turn into ethanol.
Like penicillin, the microwave, velcro, and so on.Now there's been another potentially world-changing event discovered by pure chance: a method of easily and cheaply turning carbon dioxide into ethanol fuel.Scientists from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory discovered the process, which requires nitrogen, applied voltage, and spikes of carbon embedded with copper nanoparticles.The team was in what they thought would be the first of many steps needed to convert CO2 into methanol, before discovering it was converting he gas into ethanol by itself.The conversion process essentially reverses the effects of combustion, with the nanotech catalyst forcing the carbon dioxide to dissolve in water and transform into ethanol.The reaction produces small amounts of several products, but the yield of ethanol was 63-65 per cent.
Like penicillin, the microwave, velcro, and so on.Now there's been another potentially world-changing event discovered by pure chance: a method of easily and cheaply turning carbon dioxide into ethanol fuel.Scientists from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory discovered the process, which requires nitrogen, applied voltage, and spikes of carbon embedded with copper nanoparticles.The team was in what they thought would be the first of many steps needed to convert CO2 into methanol, before discovering it was converting he gas into ethanol by itself.The conversion process essentially reverses the effects of combustion, with the nanotech catalyst forcing the carbon dioxide to dissolve in water and transform into ethanol.The reaction produces small amounts of several products, but the yield of ethanol was 63-65 per cent.
Oak Ridge National Laboratory scientists from the United states in Tennessee have managed to transform carbon dioxide etanoliksi a surprisingly simple way, the Engadget report.the researchers were pre-assumed that the carbon modification etanoliksi require a multi-step reaction chain and several of a catalyst.through the Process to export the enough, only one catalyst.This catalyst is based on piilevy, which is copper, and carbon consisting of nanosized spikes.Each peak from the is nanopisarat nitrogen.When this entity is exposed to carbon dioxide gas and a small electrical current, it produces a chain reaction, the result of which is liquid ethanol.
Scientists at the Department of Energy s Oak Ridge National Laboratory developed an electrochemical process that uses tiny spikes of carbon and copper to turn CO2 into the fuel.In particular, the team used a catalyst made of carbon, copper and nitrogen and applied voltage to trigger a complicated chemical reaction that essentially reverses the combustion process.With the help of this catalyst, the solution of carbon dioxide dissolved in water and turned into ethanol.Typically, this type of electrochemical reaction results in a mix of several different products in small amounts.We discovered somewhat by accident that this material worked, said ORNL s Adam Rondinone, lead author of the team s study published in ChemistrySelect.We were trying to study the first step of a proposed reaction when we realised that the catalyst was doing the entire reaction on its own.
National Laboratory Scientists in Tennessee claim that, somewhat serendipitously,The researchers, who work at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, developed a process that adds "nano-spikes" — essentially tiny bursts — of carbon and copper to CO2 to transform it into ethanol, the type of alcohol found in handEthanol can also be turned into fuel — gasoline in Brazil
How interesting that you'd say that, GavinBT's chief exec Gavin Patterson has claimed an Openreach split would make future UK broadband investments more challenging and increase the firm's already-ballooning pension deficit.Contrary to claims that its TV arm has siphoned off broadband investment cash, a diversified business has made the case for investment easier, he said."Ultimately you have to be able to make investments over long periods.. if you are only looking at the wholesale, Openreach side, then some of these investments are going to be a more challenging business case to make."He said the pension deficit is running into billions, with some people saying it could now be as high £10bn.The comments come as the regulator Ofcom decides whether to act on its preferred option to make Openreach a legally separate company from BT – with its own independent board, or push ahead with full structural separation.
From the Big Bang and radioactivity to microwaves and penicillin, history is full of serendipitous discoveries.Earlier this week, scientists at the US Department of Energy announced an accidental breakthrough of their own – a simple way to turn CO2 into fuel.After devising a long-winded reverse-combustion process, the team realised that the first stage of the reaction turned the gas into ethanol, a useful fuel.We re taking carbon dioxide, a waste product of combustion, and we re pushing that combustion reaction backwards with very high selectivity to a useful fuel, said Adam Rondinone, lead author of the study.Ethanol was a surprise – it s extremely difficult to go straight from carbon dioxide to ethanol with a single catalyst, Rondinone added.The catalyst s hidden weapon is a nanoscale structure made of copper nanoparticles on carbon spikes.
UK.gov 'working with fibre providers to find a solution'Digital minister Matt Hancock has said pure fibre and 5G are the priority for Blighty's digital infrastructure over the next decade - but has indicated the government won't be paying for it.Speaking at the Broadband World Forum event today, he said by 2020 the volume of global internet traffic would be 95 times what it is now.To paraphrase Al Gore: the last thing any of us wants is to end up as road kill on the information superhighway."Hancock said our current part-fibre, part-copper infrastructure has brought superfast connectivity to the majority of the country, with 95 per cent of the country to have 24mbps next year.He said: "New entrants have shown a full-fibre solution can be economic," citing the Gigabit City project in York, and companies such as Gigaclear bringing fibre to the Cotswolds.
Scientists at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have accidentally discovered a process by which they are able to convert the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide into ethanol that can be used for fuel.The electrochemical process uses tiny spikes of carbon and copper in the conversion process.In addition to the carbon and copper, the process also requires nitrogen and an applied voltage.We discovered somewhat by accident that this material worked, said ORNL s Adam Rondinone, lead author of the team s study published in ChemistrySelect.We were trying to study the first step of a proposed reaction when we realized that the catalyst was doing the entire reaction on its own.The chemical reaction that takes place is very complicated and is said to essentially reverse the combustion process.
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