Lithium metal batteries could increase EV range, but longevity must improve.
I don’t think my psychiatrist needs to know how much time I waste doomscrolling on Twitter or texting cute cat videos to my friends.
Marijuana can be a useful tool for many patients, especially for pain and nausea relief.At the same time, like all other medications, it does carry risks and side effects," said Alexandra Saunders from the Dalhousie University in Canada.https://www.marijuana-direct.com/blog/marijuana-thc-can-affect-heart-health-in-elderly.html
One defining feature of the beginning of the twenty-first century is the growing acceptance that our world (environment, economy, politics and culture) is highly diverse but strongly interrelated and interdependent.Being a responsible professional involves taking into account that professional practice contributes to society, in addition to considering the effects that attitudes and actions have on the profession.Three engineers consider today's meaning of engineering and what responsibility lies with engineering in the sustainable development of modern society.Josep Maria Basart, a professor of the Department of Information and Communications Engineering (UAB); Mireia Farrús, a member of the Department of Information and Communication Technologies (DTIC) at UPF, and Montse Serra, a member of the Faculty of Computer Science, Multimedia and Telecommunications (UOC), examine this in an article published in September in the journal IEEE and Society Technology Magazine.The authors point out that today, a professional engineer must be aware that their profession involves two dimensions: a technical one, to become a competent professional (knowledge and skills), and a social one, to become a committed professional (values, goals and principles).Thus, the social dimension emphasizes the value of service that engineering provides to society and the engineer becomes aware that their work contributes to an open social enterprise, rather than merely a way of earning a living or becoming successful.
Through research by a political scientist at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), there is potential to see diplomacy between nations improve through the use of Twitter."I contend that this ensuing Twiplomacy, if committed to the dissemination and exchange of reason and arguments, holds the potential to improve global public deliberation and contribute to a more legitimate form of global governance by the United Nations," said Hofferberth.The UN was founded in 1945 and is currently made up of 193 Member States.The international organization provides a forum for governments to find areas of agreement on common issues such as security, climate change, human rights, sustainable development, terrorism and health emergencies to solve problems together.The organization joined Twitter in March of 2008 and currently has 11 million followers.The paper describes how Hofferberth determined key agencies and individuals within the UN Twittersphere (who is tweeting) and collected tweets during the opening weeks of the 73rd UN Session last year that began on September 18 and ended on October 5, 2018.
Canadian scientists have identified microscopic creatures that are so unlike anything seen before, they had to create an entirely new branch on the evolutionary tree of life to slot them in.A new paper published last week in Nature offers the first genetic analysis of hemimastigotes—a rare and poorly understood group of single-celled microorganisms.But they’re eukaryotes, having complex cells and a clearly defined nucleus.“This discovery literally redraws our branch of the ‘Tree of Life’ at one of its deepest points,” explained Alastair Simpson, the lead author of the study and biology professor at Dalhousie, in a statement.“It opens a new door to understanding the evolution of complex cells—and their ancient origins—back well before animals and plants emerged on Earth.”Using a new technique called single-cell transcriptonomics, and with the help of PhD candidate Gordon Lax, the Dalhousie team was able to tease large amounts of genetic material from the two species of hemimastigotes.
Washington DC, Feb. 22 - A study published today in Science illuminates the extent of global fishing - down to individual vessel movements and hourly activity - and opens an unprecedented gateway for improved ocean management.The study shows that, while the footprint of capture fishing extends across more than half the global ocean, activity is clearly bounded by different management regimes, indicating the role well-enforced policy can play in curbing over-exploitation.Using satellite feeds, machine learning techniques and common ship tracking technology, a team of researchers from Global Fishing Watch, the National Geographic Society's Pristine Seas project, University of California Santa Barbara, Dalhousie University, SkyTruth, Google, and Stanford University found that industrial fishing covers more than 55 percent of the ocean's surface - over four times the area covered by agriculture."By publishing the data and analysis, we aim to increase transparency in the commercial fishing industry and improve opportunities for sustainable management," said lead author, David Kroodsma, the Director of Research and Development at Global Fishing Watch.While most nations appear to fish predominantly within their own exclusive economic zones (EEZs), China, Spain, Taiwan, Japan and South Korea account for 85 percent of observed fishing on the high seas.The total area of the ocean fished is likely higher than the 55 percent estimated, as the data do not include some fishing effort in regions of poor satellite coverage or in EEZs with a low percentage of vessels using AIS.
"As the field of data science continues to expand rapidly, increasingly intertwining with our day-to-day lives, the KDD conference prides itself on being the place where several concepts such as Big Data, predictive analytics, and crowdsourcing originated," said Stan Matwin of Dalhousie University, General Co-Chair for KDD 2017.Cynthia Dwork, Distinguished Scientist - Microsoft Research / Harvard UniversityTuesday, August 15, 8:00 - 9:30Data, algorithms, and systems have biases embedded within them reflecting designers' explicit and implicit choices, historical biases, and societal priorities.They form, literally and inexorably, a codification of values."Unfairness" of algorithms - for tasks ranging from advertising to recidivism prediction - has attracted considerable attention in the popular press.
Seabird poo: great for ruining your picnic at the beach, and according to new research, good for keeping the Arctic cool.But if the birds want to stop their summertime home from melting away, they re going to have to start taking laxatives.An intriguing new study in Nature Communications describes the hidden wonders of seabird poo, a miracle substance that can seed clouds and keep the sun s harsh rays at bay.It all started when a Dalhousie University-led team of atmospheric scientists measured high concentrations of ammonia in the air surrounding the Canadian Arctic.Their journey of discovery led the researchers to seabirds, which every summer flock to the Arctic by the tens of millions to eat, breed, and shit.By modelling the behaviour of chemicals in the guano droppings found at seabird colonies, the researchers determined that bacterial digestion of bird crap is responsible for the ammonia spikes.
Seabird poo: great for ruining your picnic at the beach, and according to new research, good for keeping the Arctic cool.But if the birds want to stop their summertime home from melting away, they re going to have to start taking laxatives.An intriguing new study in Nature Communications describes the hidden wonders of seabird poo, a miracle substance that can seed clouds and keep the sun s harsh rays at bay.It all started when a Dalhousie University-led team of atmospheric scientists measured high concentrations of ammonia in the air surrounding the Canadian Arctic.Their journey of discovery led the researchers to seabirds, which every summer flock to the Arctic by the tens of millions to eat, breed, and shit.By modelling the behaviour of chemicals in the guano droppings found at seabird colonies, the researchers determined that bacterial digestion of bird crap is responsible for the ammonia spikes.
Smart lighting may be the next Internet of Things IoT attack vector, thanks to hackable Philips Hue smart lightbulbs.Researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel, and Dalhousie University, Canada, created a proof-of-concept worm that can be used spread from across the smart lightbulbs potentially infecting a whole network of them and opening them up for exploitation.In the IoT Goes Nuclear: Creating a ZigBee Chain Reaction paper, the researchers noted how through exploiting universal encryption keys over the ZigBee wireless networking standard they can compromise a Philips Hue lightbulb from a distance of around 400 metres. The worm spreads by jumping directly from one lamp to its neighbours, using only their built-in ZigBee wireless connectivity and their physical proximity, the researchers said.To demonstrate the risks involved, we use results from percolation theory to estimate the critical mass of installed devices for a typical city such as Paris whose area is about 105 square kilometres: The chain reaction will fizzle if there are fewer than about 15,000 randomly located smart lights in the whole city, but will spread everywhere when the number exceeds this critical mass which had almost certainly been surpassed already .To carry out the attack the researchers first had to figure out how to yank a Hue lightbulb from its network .
Philips Hue smart bulbs allow users to control the intensity and colour of the web-connected bulbs via a computer or a smartphone.To continue providing news and award winning journalism, we rely on advertising revenue.To continue reading, please turn off your ad blocker or whitelist us.According to a new study titled, "IoT goes nuclear: Creating a ZigBee Chain Reaction," researchers from Welzmann Institute of Science in Israel and Dalhousie University in Novascotia, Canada, discovered that they were able to exploit a weakness in the common wireless radio protocol called ZigBee that is often used in other smart home devices as well.Researchers said that hackers can potentially use a method that involves tricking an internet-connected light bulb into accepting a computer worm that can then spread malicious software to other neighbouring bulbs within the network."The worm spreads by jumping directly from one lamp to its neighbors, using only their built-in ZigBee wireless connectivity and their physical proximity," researchers explained.
Prylarnas the internet offers new risks.A research team shows off their hack against the connected lighting.Researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science and Dalhousie University demonstrates how easily they can be hacked grid-connected smart lights.Because the lights are connected through wireless connection, attack can take place at a distance, through a car or drones outside the building.In the clip below you see how they chopped the lights are flashing SOS in morse code:Playback isn't supported on this device.
More

Top