Emma Corrin and Harry Styles have marked the end of filming their new project by sharing a string of brilliant behind-the-scenes snaps.The pair have spent the last few weeks filming My Policeman, adapted from the novel of the same name, which sees Emma portraying a woman who marries a police officer, played by the Grammy-winning singer, who is secretly having a relationship with another man.As she celebrated the end of filming, the star of The Crown posted a series of photos on her Instagram page.“Aaaaand that’s a falafel wrap baaaaby,” she wrote, alongside a picture of herself and Harry – whose array of tattoos were covered by makeup – sitting by the side of a swimming pool. View this post on InstagramA post shared by Emma Corrin (@emmalouisecorrin)Another picture showed Emma cosying up to co-star David Dawson on a park bench, while the third saw her face hovering over a picture of David with Harry and director Michael Grandage.My Policeman will also feature Gina McKee, Linus Roache and Rupert Everett as older versions of Emma, Harry and David’s characters, respectively.Emma rose to international stardom last year when she made her debut as Princess Diana in the fourth series of Netflix’s The Crown, a role which earned her a Golden Globe and a Critics’ Choice Award.She’ll next be seen in My Policeman, although she’s also set to take the lead in the play Anna X which arrives in London’s West End next month.Harry is obviously best known for his illustrious singing career, which began in the boyband One Direction, but he made his acting debut in the film Dunkirk in 2017.He’s also set to appear in the psychological thriller Don’t Worry Darling, the director of which, Olivia Wilde, he began dating last year.READ MORE:The Crown's Emma Corrin Recalls The Unusual Way She Ended Up Landing The Role Of Princess DianaEmma Corrin 'Incredibly Moved' By Prince Harry's Assessment Of The CrownEmma Corrin Celebrates Golden Globes Nom With Epic Throwback To Her Early Days On The Crown
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The Crown star Emma Corrin has spoken out about the unusual way she ended up landing the part of Princess Diana in the Netflix drama.Emma made her debut in The Crown last year, and quickly won plenty of praise for her performance as Diana Spencer.In a new interview with fellow Netflix star Regé-Jean Page for Variety, the British star reflected on her journey to international fame, and admitted she first caught The Crown creator Peter Morgan’s attention when she wasn’t even supposed to be auditioning.“I was sort of working, jobbing, trying to earn money in London,” she explained. “I got asked by Nina Gold and Rob Sterne, who cast The Crown, to come in and help for some of the chemistry reads they were doing between [potential] Camillas, who they were auditioning. “Peter [Morgan] had written some preliminary scenes with Camilla and Diana, and so they needed someone to read for Diana.”She continued: “It wasn’t an audition. I was being paid to be there, and I wasn’t going to be on camera.“My agent was like, ‘It’s the perfect situation because it’s going to be a no-pressure audition’.”Despite it not being a real audition for the role of Diana, Emma decided to prepare as if it were, leaning on her speech therapist mum for help.Emma said: “We decided that I would just prepare as if it was an audition. And so I did, and I worked on the voice with my mum, who is a speech therapist. And then I learned the lines.“And I just had fun, because I wasn’t really doing anything at the time.”The preparation obviously paid off, as she ended being offered an audition for Diana, a role which earned her a Golden Globe and Critics’ Choice Award, although she was curiously snubbed when it came to this year’s TV Baftas, where she wasn’t even nominated in the Best Actress category.Elizabeth Debicki will be taking over the role of Diana when The Crown returns for its fifth series, with Imelda Staunton, Jonathan Pryce and Dominic West also joining the cast.Meanwhile, Emma is currently filming with Harry Styles and David Dawson for the upcoming film My Policeman.She’s also set to take the lead in the new play Anna X, which debuts in London’s West End next month.READ MORE:Jonathan Pryce Receives Knighthood In Queen's Birthday Honours – Ahead Of The Crown DebutAndrew Scott Has Been Tipped To Play Tony Blair In The Crown And No One Knows Quite How To ReactEmma Corrin 'Incredibly Moved' By Prince Harry's Assessment Of The Crown
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Meghan Markle and Prince Harry are overjoyed after the birth of their second child, a baby girl.  “On June 4th, we were blessed with the arrival of our daughter, Lili,” the couple said in a message posted to the website of their foundation, Archewell, on Sunday. “She is more than we could have ever imagined, and we remain grateful for the love and prayers we’ve felt from across the globe. Thank you for your continued kindness and support during this very special time for our family.” The couple said in a statement shared with HuffPost that they named their baby Lilibet “Lili” Diana Mountbatten-Windsor to honour Harry’s grandmother, Queen Elizabeth, as her family nickname is “Lilibet.” Lili’s middle name, Diana, is a nod to the duke’s late mother, Princess Diana. Little Lili was born on Friday at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital in Santa Barbara, California, and weighed 7 pounds, 11 ounces.The duke and duchess are both taking parental leave and will not be releasing a photo at this time, which indicates they are continuing to chart their own course since stepping back as working members of the royal family last year.  View this post on InstagramA post shared by Misan Harriman (@misanharriman)In the past, some royals (including Princess Diana and Kate Middleton) have announced the birth of their babies and then posed for photos with their newborns as they leave the hospital. Names are generally released a few days after the birth.It was previously thought that Meghan and Harry did not want to pose for photos with their now-2-year-old son, Archie, when he was born, but the Duchess of Sussex told Oprah Winfrey in March that that narrative wasn’t entirely true. “It feels to me like things started to change when you and Harry decided that you were not going to take the picture that had been part of the tradition for years?” Winfrey asked them during the interview.“We weren’t asked to take a picture. That’s also part of the spin that was really damaging. I thought, ‘Can you just tell them the truth? Can you say to the world you’re not giving him a title and we want to keep him safe, and that if he’s not a prince, then it’s not part of the tradition? Just tell people and then they’ll understand,’” the duchess said. “But they wouldn’t do that.”Winfrey followed up by asking Meghan, “Was there a specific reason why you didn’t want to be a part of that tradition? I think many people interpreted that as you were both saying, ‘We’re going to do things our way?’”Meghan said that wasn’t what the couple intended at all.“So picture, now that you know what was going on behind the scenes, there was a lot of fear surrounding it,” the duchess said.“I was very scared of having to offer up our baby knowing that they weren’t going to be kept safe,” she added, referencing her comments elsewhere in the interview that the royal family wasn’t going to offer Archie security protection.READ MORE:The Sweet Connection Between Baby Lilibet And Princess CharlotteMeghan Markle And Prince Harry Welcome Their Second Child, Named After The QueenThe Bittersweet Reason One Of Archie's First Words Was 'Grandma'
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Meghan Markle and Prince Harry have welcomed their second child, a baby girl. Lilibet “Lili” Diana Mountbatten-Windsor was born on Friday in Santa Barbara, California. “It is with great joy that Prince Harry and Meghan, The Duke and Duchess of Sussex, welcome their daughter Lilibet ‘Lili’ Diana Mountbatten-Windsor, to the world,” a spokesperson for the Sussexes said in a statement to HuffPost Sunday. “Lili was born on Friday, June 4 at 11:40 a.m. in the trusted care of doctors and staff at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital in Santa Barbara, California.”“She weighed 7 lbs 11 oz. Both mother and child are healthy and well, and settling in at home. Lili is named after her great-grandmother, Her Majesty The Queen, whose family nickname is Lilibet,” the statement continued. “Her middle name, Diana, was chosen to honour her beloved late grandmother, The Princess of Wales.”Lilibet was first used when the then-Princess Elizabeth was young and couldn’t pronounce “Elizabeth” properly. Her grandfather, King George V, called her “Lilibet.”Royal watchers will note that Lili shares a middle name with her cousin, Princess Charlotte. Prince William and Kate Middleton’s second child’s full name is Charlotte Elizabeth Diana. Both children were so named in honour of William and Harry’s late mother, Princess Diana. Harry and Meghan announced Meghan’s pregnancy on Valentine’s Day 2021 through a lovely photo by their friend, photographer Misan Harriman. They later revealed in their famous interview with Oprah Winfrey that they were expecting a girl. The royal family congratulated the new family of four via social media.Lili joins her big brother, Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor, who was born on May 6, 2019. Related...10 Vintage Baby Names On The Rise Inspired By Lilibet Diana
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Meghan and Harry have named their daughter Lilibet ‘Lili’ Diana Mountbatten-Windsor – a sweet tribute to the Queen. Lili is named after her great-grandmother, Her Majesty The Queen, whose family nickname is Lilibet. The baby girl’s middle name, Diana, was chosen to honour her late grandmother, The Princess of Wales.Lilibet was first used when the then Princess Elizabeth was just a toddler and unable to pronounce her own name properly.Her grandfather King George V would affectionately call her “Lilibet” imitating her own attempts to say Elizabeth.The pet name stuck and she became Lilibet to her family from then on.The old-fashioned name has got us thinking about other vintage baby names having a comeback. From Princess Eugenie’s son August, to Boris Johnson and Carrie Simmons’ child Wilfred, many parents are looking to the past when naming their child.Researchers from family history platform, MyHeritage, have opened up their archives to find the traditional baby names seeing a resurgence in popularity. The most popular names when records began in 1780 were Mary, John, William and Elizabeth, they found. Other popular names at the time – Alfred, Bertie, Frank, Fred, Leonard, and Sidney – all saw a 21st-century peak in 2012. And Olive, Violet and Elsie all matched their original Victorian-era peak in 2019. MyHeritage looked at census data from the 1800s and mapped it with current trends to find the baby names seeing a revival. Here’s the top 10.1. Bertie2. Olive3. Violet4. Agnes5. Mabel6. Wilfred7. Elsie8. Leonard9. Clara10. SidneyLooking for some more inspiration? Sift through our baby names section.Related...Meghan Markle And Prince Harry Welcome Their Second Child, Named After The Queen10 Baby Names From The Edwardian Era That Stood The Test Of Time3 Baby Name Trends For 2020 That May Surprise YouRetro, Baby: These Names Were Popular For Infants In The 1950s
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The whistleblower who tried to expose Martin Bashir’s methods for landing his exclusive Panorama interview with Diana, Princess of Wales has said he wants to “move on” after he received a personal apology from the director-general of the BBC.Graphic designer Matt Wiessler was sidelined by the corporation after raising concerns that fake bank statements he mocked up for Mr Bashir had been used by the journalist to persuade Diana to do the interview.Speaking after a meeting at the BBC where he received a personal apology from current director-general Tim Davie, he was asked why the apology was important to him.He told BBC News: “Because I still felt that to this day that the BBC were just saying things to sort of appease me but I have come away from it feeling no they really really they support me and they feel really genuinely want to, not help me, but clear up the past and start again on a sort of friendly relationship.”Asked about the prospect of being paid compensation, he said: “There might well be but I’m not involved in that and Tim and I have spoken about that quite openly, it’s sort of confidential but we very much both just want to move on.”A recent investigation by Lord Dyson into the interview criticised the methods Mr Bashir used to secure his bombshell 1995 Panorama interview.The report also suggested the BBC had failed to uphold “governance, accountability and scrutiny”.A BBC spokeswoman said of the meeting: “It was both constructive and positive, but as you’d expect, we are not going to get into the specifics of a private meeting.”READ MORE:Prince William and Prince Harry Blast BBC In Scathing Statements Over Martin Bashir’s ‘Deceitful’ Princess Diana InterviewMartin Bashir Used ‘Deceitful Behaviour’ To Secure Diana Panorama Interview, Report SaysWhy Was Martin Bashir's Bombshell 1995 Princess Diana Interview Under Investigation?
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Prince Harry and Robin Williams’ son Zak have spoken of the difficulties of grieving a family member who was in the public eye.The pair were speaking in The Me You Can’t See: A Path Forward, which was released on Apple TV in the early hours of Friday and followed the docuseries by Oprah Winfrey and Harry.Robin Williams, the four-time Oscar winning actor, died by suicide in 2014.Zak said: “From my end it was really hard to separate initially the process of privately grieving versus sharing the grieving with the general public.“I really didn’t get a chance to really focus on the private grieving process until a year and a half after my dad passed away.”I lost my dad - pictured here as a cheerleader - to suicide in 2014. One of the biggest risks we face in suicide prevention is the fear of the stigma associated with seeking help. To all those who support those in need, THANK YOU. #nationalsuicidepreventiondaypic.twitter.com/49FtjCMzjw— Zak Williams (@zakwilliams) September 11, 2020Harry, whose mother Diana, Princess of Wales, died in 1997, said: “I think we have a lot of shared experience when you talk about that … when you see so many people around the world grieving for someone they feel as though they knew them better than you did in a weird way because you’re unable to grieve yourself.“It’s like … how are you grieving more for someone who was my parent and I’m unable to grieve myself?”The 90 minute show had experts from The Me You Can’t See advisory board further discussing issues raised during the five-part series on mental health.Earlier in the docuseries, Harry said he was “somewhat ashamed” of the way he dealt with Meghan sharing her suicidal thoughts before a charity event at the Royal Albert Hall in London in 2019.Harry picked up on a point raised by Jo Robinson, head of suicide prevention research at Orygen, about the importance of talking openly about suicide and self-harm.Such communication helps give voice to something that’s “terribly distressing and terribly frightening for them to talk about”, she [email protected] and Prince Harry share their perspective on how COVID-19 has impacted the world’s mental health and emotional well-being. Watch #TheMeYouCantSee on Apple TV+ https://t.co/tP72EVOJb2pic.twitter.com/5tZGWbjY3l— Apple TV (@AppleTV) May 27, 2021The Duke said: “I think it’s so interesting because so many people are afraid of being on the receiving end of that conversation (about suicide) because they don’t feel as though they have the right tools to be able to give the right advice but what you’re saying is you’re there.“Listen, because listening and being part of that conversation is, without a doubt, the best first step that you can take.”Harry also told Oprah that he felt mental health and climate change were “two of the most pressing issues that we’re facing and, in many ways, they are linked”.“The connecting line is about our collective well-being and when our collective well-being erodes, that affects our ability to be caretakers of ourselves, of our communities and of our planet ultimately,” the Duke of Sussex added.“We have to create a more supportive culture for each other where challenges don’t have to live in the dark, where vulnerability is healthy and encouraged and, of course, where physical and mental health can be treated equally because they are one.”It’s hard to put yourself out there and share your story, especially on a level like this. I owe all my gratitude to every person who agreed to be followed, profiled, and be examples to the world. I thank you. I see you. #TheMeYouCantSeepic.twitter.com/uaBgice7PH— Oprah Winfrey (@Oprah) May 21, 2021Lady Gaga and Glenn Close also featured in the series, with Gaga discussing her serious mental health struggles after she was raped as a teenager.Glenn returned for the conversation special and spoke about the impact of Covid-19 on her wellbeing.She told Harry and Winfrey: “It has directly affected my mental health. It helped that I had a dog.“I think – and I was thinking about this today – we have gone through an amazing, unprecedented time now. For me, I think it’s as big a shift in the world as 9/11 was.“We now are in a transforming world. It will take us a while to be able to articulate to ourselves what the result of that has been on us as individuals.”Useful websites and helplinesMind, open Monday to Friday, 9am-6pm on 0300 123 3393.Samaritans offers a listening service which is open 24 hours a day, on 116 123 (UK and ROI - this number is FREE to call and will not appear on your phone bill).CALM (the Campaign Against Living Miserably) offer a helpline open 5pm-midnight, 365 days a year, on 0800 58 58 58, and a webchat service.The Mix is a free support service for people under 25. Call 0808 808 4994 or email [email protected] Mental Illness offers practical help through its advice line which can be reached on 0808 801 0525 (Monday to Friday 10am-4pm). More info can be found on rethink.org.READ MORE:Prince Harry Reveals He Used Drink And Drugs To Cope With Trauma Of Princess Diana’s DeathPrince Harry Accuses Family Of ‘Total Neglect’ Over Meghan Markle's Mental Health StrugglesPrince Harry Nails Why You Shouldn't Say 'You Need Help' To Someone Struggling
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Can you ever have too much therapy? Apparently Prince Harry has.That’s according to NHS psychiatrist Dr Max Pemberton, who wrote in a column for the Daily Mail: “He is starting to embody the characteristics of those who’ve had too much therapy – self-centred, self-obsessed, aggrieved and resentful.”Dr Pemberton’s critique came after Harry spoke about leaving the royal family to break what the prince called a cycle of “genetic pain”. Most recently, the 36-year-old appeared in a mental health series on Apple TV, The Me You Can’t See, where he said the trauma of his mother’s death led to him using alcohol and drugs to numb his emotions. He was just 12 when Diana, Princess of Wales, died in a car crash while being pursued by the press in Paris. Dr Pemberton opined that instead of talking, it would be better if he showed, through actions, how he’d turned his difficulties into something positive, “rather than sounding spoilt and angry”. He added “sometimes a stiff upper lip is what’s needed” rather than “airing every grievance”. But many others disagree.Nobody has any idea about Prince Harry’s internal experiences, what happened in his therapy sessions, or the details of his closest relationships, says Dr Emma Taylor, clinical psychologist at City Psychology Group.Rather, people have the illusion of knowing those things about him from what he chooses to talk about in public, and filling in the gaps with assumptions. “It’s an odd idea, that there’s a ‘right’ amount of comfort with emotions and he’s gone past that sweet spot into over-disclosure and lack of boundaries,” she says.Counselling Directory member Karen Schumann is concerned public comments about Harry having “too much therapy” may contribute to stigma that exists surrounding seeking help in society. The comments “are not helpful for anyone who might be considering getting help with their mental health,” she says.Away from the royal debate, the discussion did get us thinking: is it ever possible for someone to have “too much” therapy? And how do you know when it’s right to stop, if at all? We spoke to experts to find out. Can you have ‘too much’ therapy?As with anything in life, it is possible to have too much, to an extent. Whether a therapist would let you get to that stage is another question altogether. In the UK, you only get so many chances at having free therapy on the NHS before your set number of sessions end and you’re added to the back of a (sometimes very long) queue if you require more. For those who pay privately, it can be costly to continue indefinitely, or have it more than once a week. Psychologist Dr Taylor tells HuffPost UK: “You might imagine that as a therapist I’d be in favour of people being permanently in therapy, but in the models I work in, the point of being in therapy is to end therapy. It’s a great day at work for me when someone finishes because things have changed in their life, they’ve made good use of the work we’ve done and now they don’t need therapy anymore.”Schumann suggests you shouldn’t have therapy more than once a week, “as there needs to be time to reflect, integrate and recuperate, particularly when working with trauma”. And psychotherapist Dee Johnson likens therapy to using stabilisers on a bike – it’s useful until the person is able to “cycle on their own”.So when does therapy no longer serve its purpose?There’s a natural point in therapy where it might not feel like it’s making a difference anymore because you’ve processed how you feel, or learned coping mechanisms for dealing with the issue you originally sought help for. Schumann suggests therapy may no longer be needed when a person starts to feel better about what they came to therapy for – so, for example, someone with anxiety might feel like they have the tools to help them going forward. Others may reach acceptance. “They can’t change what they’ve been through, but they have come to an acceptance, a letting go, a feeling of wanting to live life again,” says Schumann.A person might linger in therapy because they have a particular difficulty with endings, says Dr Taylor. They may have become dependent on the therapist and feel they’re continuing with them as more of a “safety blanket”, says Schumann. And when this is the case, therapy may no longer be serving its purpose. “With good boundaries in place and with the help of the therapist to explore these feelings, the relationship can come to an end with the person feeling safe and confident for the future,” she says.Other times, people might use therapy as avoidance, says Dr Taylor, at which point it’s not helpful either. If this happens, you might talk endlessly about your feelings rather than actually feeling them, or always take problems to therapy rather than trying to solve them yourself. You might look to the therapist for advice and answers, rather than working out what you want. “A good therapist should notice those things going on and address them directly,” she says.How do you know it’s the right time to end therapy?Some people are only given a set amount of sessions, which would mean therapy ends whether you want it to or not. In other cases, there’s more of an organic ending process, where a therapist might check in with a person to see whether their feelings about what they first came to them for has shifted.“I usually ask the person what they feel about booking more sessions, and the interesting natural responses tend to give a good indication,” says Johnson. “If a person is still keen, they still need therapy. But often, when a person hesitates and is not sure, that’s the point to reflect [on whether they need more].“Working honestly and openly is key, but not fully shutting the door. If you find a therapist that really worked for you, if another life event occurs you have already got that alliance with them and may be able to contact them in the future.”Johnson’s right, it’s important to remember therapy might not be a one-time thing – you can go back to it, even once it’s ended. “Life is complicated and things change,” adds Dr Taylor. “As a young adult, you might go to therapy to deal with the impact childhood experiences are having on your relationships, and you might get to a point where you’re ready to end therapy. But 10 years later, you might have children of your own and find some of your earlier experiences come back to the surface and you need more support at that point.“It was still the right decision to end when you did, and the right decision to come back when you need more help.”Useful websites and helplinesMind, open Monday to Friday, 9am-6pm on 0300 123 3393.Samaritans offers a listening service which is open 24 hours a day, on 116 123 (UK and ROI - this number is FREE to call and will not appear on your phone bill).CALM (the Campaign Against Living Miserably) offer a helpline open 5pm-midnight, 365 days a year, on 0800 58 58 58, and a webchat service.The Mix is a free support service for people under 25. Call 0808 808 4994 or email [email protected] Mental Illness offers practical help through its advice line which can be reached on 0808 801 0525 (Monday to Friday 10am-4pm). More info can be found on rethink.org.Related...Prince Harry Reveals He Used Drink And Drugs To Cope With Trauma Of Princess Diana’s DeathWhat Is ‘Genetic Pain’? How To Spot Your Intergenerational TraumaPrince Harry Accuses Family Of ‘Total Neglect’ Over Meghan Markle's Mental Health StrugglesPrince Harry Nails Why You Shouldn't Say 'You Need Help' To Someone StrugglingThe Best Day Of The Week To Take A Mental Health Day Off Work7 Ways To Undo The Brain Fog You're Feeling Because Of The PandemicMen Journal, Too – And They’re Starting To Talk About It
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Martin Bashir has apologised to Princess Diana’s sons for duping her into an explosive BBC interview in 1995.Bashir, in a Sunday newspaper interview, said he is “deeply sorry” to Prince William and Harry. But Bashir insisted that his profoundly revealing conversation with the fragile princess did her no harm.“I never wanted to harm Diana in any way and I don’t believe we did,” he told London’s Sunday Times. “Everything we did in terms of the interview was as she wanted — from when she wanted to alert the palace, to when it was broadcast, to its contents.” He added: “My family and I loved her.” The Times described Bashir as a “broken man who can’t quite admit he wronged Diana.”Diana was tricked into submitting to the interview with the help of bank documents Bashir instructed a BBC graphic artist to doctor, former British Supreme Court judge John Dyson determined after a six-month investigation.The records were provided to Diana’s brother, Earl Spencer, and appeared to show that media mogul Rupert Murdoch’s News International was paying a security guard, and possibly even private secretaries of Diana and Prince Charles. The implication was that they were being paid to provide information about Diana. Bashir used the shared information to convince Spencer to arrange a meeting with his sister, the investigation found.Spencer said Bashir showed him the documents “to groom me, so that he could then get to Diana for the interview he was always secretly after.”Bashir released a statement Thursday apologising for “the fact that I asked for bank statements to be mocked up.” But he insisted it wasn’t the fake documents that convinced Diana to participate in the interview.“It was a stupid thing to do and was an action I deeply regret,” he said in the statement. “I also reiterate that the bank statements had no bearing whatsoever on the personal choice by Princess Diana to take part in the interview.” Bashir repeated that defence to the Sunday Times — did not reveal what he believed convinced her to participate.“She led the way in addressing so many ... issues, and that’s why I will always remain immensely proud of that interview,” he also noted.In her riveting, tell-all interview, Diana discussed the pain of Charles’ long-term, continuing affair with then-married Camilla Parker-Bowles, who is now Charles’ wife and the Duchess of Cornwall. “There were three of us in this marriage, so it was a bit crowded,” said the sad princess.Diana also talked about her post-partum depression after William was born, and her battles with self-harming and bulimia. Charles asked for a divorce the month after the interview. Diana was killed at the age of 35 with boyfriend Dodi Fayed in a car accident in Paris in 1997 as they fled paparazzi.Despite complaints after the interview and a BBC internal investigation, the network cleared Bashir of wrongdoing. The Dyson report slammed the BBC probe as “woefully ineffective.” BBC Chair Richard Sharp issued an apology and said the network committed “unacceptable failures.”There was no immediate reaction from the royal family to Bashir’s new interview. But William and Harry each issued blistering statements Thursday slamming the BBC and Bashir, who quit the network earlier this month.“Our mother lost her life because of this, and nothing has changed,” said Harry, the Duke of Sussex.William, the Duke of Cambridge, said Bashir’s deception led to the interview and shaded what his mother said. “It is my view that the deceitful way the interview was obtained substantially influenced what my mother said,” he said in a statement. “The interview was a major contribution to making my parents’ relationship worse and has since hurt countless others.”READ MORE:Prince William and Prince Harry Blast BBC In Scathing Statements Over Martin Bashir’s ‘Deceitful’ Princess Diana InterviewNothing Like BBC's Diana Interview Must 'Ever Happen Again', Says Boris JohnsonWhy Was Martin Bashir's Bombshell 1995 Princess Diana Interview Under Investigation?
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The former BBC journalist tells Prince William and Prince Harry he's "deeply sorry" for that famous Diana broadcast from 1995. But he says the interview didn't cause her harm.
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The former BBC journalist tells Prince William and Prince Harry he's "deeply sorry" for that famous Diana broadcast from 1995. But he says the interview didn't cause her harm.
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In The Me You Can't See on Apple TV Plus, the prince talks about losing his mother, Diana, when he was only 12.
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In The Me You Can't See, the prince talks about losing his mother, Diana, when he was only 12.
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In The Me You Can't See, the prince talks about losing his mother, Diana, when he was only 12.
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Boris Johnson has said the BBC must take “every possible step” to make sure “nothing like” its interview with Diana, Princess of Wales, “ever happens again”.Speaking on Friday the prime minister said he was “obviously very concerned” about the report into the 1995 Panorama programme.William and Harry have condemned the BBC for its treatment of their mother.They said interview fuelled her “fear, paranoia and isolation” and a wider “culture of exploitation and unethical practices ultimately took her life”.The furious royal brothers issued scathing statements on the corporation’s actions after an inquiry found the broadcaster covered up “deceitful behaviour” used by journalist Martin Bashir to secure his headline-making interview.Bashir was in “serious breach” of the BBC’s producer guidelines when he faked bank statements and showed them to Diana’s brother Earl Spencer to gain access to the princess, a report by Lord Dyson said.Johnson said: “I can only imagine the feelings of the royal family and I hope very much that the BBC will be taking every possible step to make sure nothing like this ever happens again.“I’m obviously concerned by the findings of Lord Dyson’s report – I’m very grateful to him for what he has done.The findings of the 127-page document have prompted developments, with Scotland Yard, which previously said it would not launch a criminal investigation into Bashir’s actions, now saying it will “assess” the report to “to ensure there is no significant new evidence”.Justice secretary Robert Buckland said ministers would be looking into whether there were BBC governance issues outside of the remit of Lord Dyson’s reports that needed reviewing.Buckland told ITV’s Good Morning Britain: “My colleague the culture secretary, Oliver Dowden, has rightly said that we should look at the governance structures of the BBC.“They have apologised, which is appropriate, but clearly the wider issues of governance and the way things are run now need to be looked at.”In his rebuke of the BBC, the Duke of Cambridge said: “The interview was a major contribution to making my parents’ relationship worse and has since hurt countless others.“It brings indescribable sadness to know that the BBC’s failures contributed significantly to her fear, paranoia and isolation that I remember from those final years with her.“But what saddens me most, is that if the BBC had properly investigated the complaints and concerns first raised in 1995, my mother would have known that she had been deceived.“She was failed not just by a rogue reporter, but by leaders at the BBC who looked the other way rather than asking the tough questions.”Calling  for the documentary never to be aired again, William, 38, said: “In an era of fake news, public service broadcasting and a free press have never been more important. These failings, identified by investigative journalists, not only let my mother down, and my family down; they let the public down too.”Related...The Bittersweet Reason One Of Archie's First Words Was 'Grandma'Prince William and Prince Harry Blast BBC In Scathing Statements Over Martin Bashir’s ‘Deceitful’ Princess Diana InterviewPrince Harry Accuses Family Of ‘Total Neglect’ Over Meghan Markle's Mental Health Struggles
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Prince Harry has said one of his son’s first words was “grandma”, as he spoke of his sadness that his mother was not around to see him become a father.Speaking in the fifth episode of Apple TV’s The Me You Can’t See, his mental health documentary series with Oprah Winfrey, Harry told of being “really sad” that Diana, Princess of Wales, could not be there to meet Archie.Harry said Archie learned the word “grandma” because of a picture of his mother in the nursery at their home in Los Angeles.The series showed new footage of Harry playing with his toddler son on a beach and on some swings. Another clip saw Meghan and Archie reading a book together and laughing.Harry said: “We’ve got a beautiful little boy who keeps us busy, who keeps us running around. He makes us laugh every day which is great. We [have] got two dogs and then another little baby girl on the way, I never dreamt that.”Harry said that he had “no doubt” his mother Diana would be “incredibly proud” of him for living the life she would have wanted.He was just 12 when she died in August 1997 in a car crash while being pursued by the press in Paris. He went on to say: “I wish she could have met Meghan, I wish she was around for Archie.“I got a photo up in his nursery and it was one of the first words that he said, apart from ‘mama’, ‘papa’ it was then ‘grandma’ – Grandma Diana.“It’s the sweetest thing, but at the same time it makes me really sad, because she should be here.”The documentary series focuses on mental illness to inspire viewers to have an honest conversation about the challenges people face.Related...Lady Gaga Suffered ‘Total Psychotic Break’ After Being Left Pregnant By RapistPrince Harry Reveals He Used Drink And Drugs To Cope With Trauma Of Princess Diana’s DeathWhy Was Martin Bashir's Bombshell 1995 Princess Diana Interview Under Investigation?
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The government will look at whether reforms of BBC governance are required in the wake of Lord Dyson’s “damning” report on the 1995 Panorama Diana interview, ministers have said.Lord Dyson’s findings that the broadcaster covered up the “deceitful behaviour” of journalist Martin Bashir in the handling of his interview with Diana, Princess of Wales was met with criticism from her two sons.The corporation sent personal apologies to the Prince of Wales, the dukes of Cambridge and Sussex, and Diana’s brother Earl Spencer.In a statement released on Thursday evening, culture secretary Oliver Dowden said the government will consider whether further changes are needed at the BBC following Lord Dyson’s report.He said: “Lord Dyson’s report reveals damning failings at the heart of the BBC.“We will now reflect on Lord Dyson’s thorough report and consider whether further governance reforms at the BBC are needed in the mid-term Charter review.“I welcome the fact that the new leadership launched this independent inquiry and expect them to ensure that this can never happen again.”The royal charter forms the constitutional basis for the BBC and sets out its mission and public purpose, as well as its governance and regulatory arrangements.The current charter started on January 1 2017 and ends on December 31 2027.The mid-term review of the charter, due in 2022, will focus on governance and regulatory arrangements, but not the broadcaster’s mission or funding.Justice Secretary Robert Buckland said the government had a responsibility to look at whether the BBC needs reform in the wake of Lord Dyson’s inquiry.Mr Buckland told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: “The government has to, in the light of these serious findings, consider the matter very carefully and comprehensively indeed.“Because it wasn’t just the decision of a reporter or a production team, there were decisions made much further up the chain about the conduct of these individuals that have now proved, according to Lord Dyson, to be unfounded and wrong.“And therefore government does have a responsibility to look very carefully to see whether the governance of the BBC does need reform in the light of these devastating findings.”The broadcaster has long faced political scrutiny amid some reported calls for the licence fee to be replaced by a subscription service and certain channels sold.Former Number 10 senior aide Dominic Cummings was previously criticised for his influence on government policy towards the BBC.In a House of Lords debate in March last year, broadcaster and Labour peer Baroness Bakewell asked whether the government was following his alleged agenda of “undermining the BBC”.Film producer and Labour peer Lord Puttnam also warned in the debate of a “decades long campaign of salami-slicing and intimidation by successive Conservative governments”.On the Today programme, it was put to Buckland that the BBC had “many political enemies” and he was asked if Boris Johnson would use the Panorama incident as an “excuse” to “tackle the BBC”.He replied: “I don’t think anybody should be using this very serious set of revelations as an excuse to do or not do anything.“The facts, sadly, speak very much for themselves.“We’ve heard the reaction of the family and I think it’s incumbent upon everybody to soberly and calmly go through what has happened here, and to make appropriate changes in order to ensure that this sort of thing can never and should never happen again.”Related...Prince William and Prince Harry Blast BBC In Scathing Statements Over Martin Bashir’s ‘Deceitful’ Princess Diana InterviewPrince Harry Accuses Family Of ‘Total Neglect’ Over Meghan Markle's Mental Health StrugglesWhy Was Martin Bashir's Bombshell 1995 Princess Diana Interview Under Investigation?
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Here's why the BBC and Princess Diana are trending on social media.
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Prince William and Prince Harry have issued stinging attacks on the BBC over Martin Bashir’s Panorama interview with Diana, Princess of Wales.The Duke of Cambridge said the 1995 interview fuelled her “fear, paranoia and isolation” in the final years of her life and damaged her relationship with the Prince of Wales.Prince Harry also hit out at the corporation, saying: “The ripple effect of a culture of exploitation and unethical practices ultimately took her life.”The furious brothers issued scathing statements on the BBC’s actions after an inquiry found the broadcaster covered up “deceitful behaviour” used by journalist Bashir to secure his headline-making 1995 interview with their mother.In his rebuke of the BBC, William said: “The interview was a major contribution to making my parents’ relationship worse and has since hurt countless others.“It brings indescribable sadness to know that the BBC’s failures contributed significantly to her fear, paranoia and isolation that I remember from those final years with her.“But what saddens me most, is that if the BBC had properly investigated the complaints and concerns first raised in 1995, my mother would have known that she had been deceived.“She was failed not just by a rogue reporter, but by leaders at the BBC who looked the other way rather than asking the tough questions.”Calling for the documentary never to be aired again, William said: “In an era of fake news, public service broadcasting and a free press have never been more important. These failings, identified by investigative journalists, not only let my mother down, and my family down; they let the public down too.”In a separate statement, Harry said: “Our mother was an incredible woman who dedicated her life to service. She was resilient, brave, and unquestionably honest.“The ripple effect of a culture of exploitation and unethical practices ultimately took her life. To those who have taken some form of accountability, thank you for owning it.“That is the first step towards justice and truth. Yet what deeply concerns me is that practices like these—and even worse—are still widespread today.“Then, and now, it’s bigger than one outlet, one network, or one publication. Our mother lost her life because of this, and nothing has changed.“By protecting her legacy, we protect everyone, and uphold the dignity with which she lived her life. Let’s remember who she was and what she stood for.”An inquiry from Lord Dyson found the BBC covered up Bashir’s deceit and “fell short of high standards of integrity and transparency”.The journalist was in “serious breach” of the BBC’s producer guidelines when he faked bank statements and showed them to Earl Spencer, Diana’s brother, to gain access to the princess in 1995, the report said.The BBC has written to the royal family to apologise for the circumstances surrounding the interview, in which Diana said: “Well, there were three of us in this marriage, so it was a bit crowded”, a reference to Camilla Parker Bowles – who Charles later married.Personal expressions of regret have been sent to the Queen, Prince of Wales, the Dukes of Cambridge and Sussex, and Diana’s brother Charles, Earl Spencer.The earl has said he “draws a line” between the Panorama interview with his sister and her death two years later.He told a Panorama programme on Thursday the consequences of the princess’ decision to do the interview contributed to her death in a car crash in Paris on August 31, 1997.Diana and her lover Dodi Fayed died when their car crashed in the Pont de l’Alma tunnel as they were being pursued by the paparazzi.At the time of her death, the princess had been divorced for a year after the final stages of her marriage break-up had become public.Lord Dyson’s report said: “By showing Earl Spencer the fake Waller and Jephson/Aylard statements and informing him of their contents, Mr Bashir deceived and induced him to arrange a meeting with Princess Diana. By gaining access to Princess Diana in this way, Mr Bashir was able to persuade her to agree to give the interview.”An internal 1996 BBC investigation into the matter led by former director-general Lord Tony Hall, who was director of BBC news and current affairs at the time, and another senior manager Anne Sloman, was described as “woefully ineffective” by Lord Dyson’s report.Lord Hall has apologised and said: “I was wrong to give Martin Bashir the benefit of the doubt, basing that judgment as I did on what appeared to be deep remorse on his part.”A handwritten note from Diana on Kensington Palace notepaper, which was part of the evidence in the inquiry, said Bashir did not show her any documents or give her any information “that I was not previously aware of”.She said she took part in the interview “without any undue pressure” and had “no regrets concerning the matter”.Bashir has apologised for faking the documents and said it was “a stupid thing to do” and “an action I deeply regret”, but maintained it had “no bearing whatsoever on the personal choice by Princess Diana to take part in the interview”.He said he will “always remain immensely proud of that interview”.READ MORE:Why Was Martin Bashir's Bombshell 1995 Princess Diana Interview Under Investigation?Martin Bashir Used ‘Deceitful Behaviour’ To Secure Diana Panorama Interview, Report SaysMartin Bashir Quits The BBC On Medical Grounds Amid Investigation Into Diana Interview
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Prince Harry has accused his family of “total neglect” over his wife Megan Markle’s mental health struggles during a new interview with Oprah Winfrey.The Duke of Sussex opens up about his and his wife’s mental wellbeing in the Apple TV documentary series, The Me You Can’t See.In the doc, Harry claims that his requests for help were ignored by the royal family when his wife was struggling while she was pregnant with their son Archie.“I thought my family would help, but every single ask, request, warning, whatever it is, just got met with total silence, total neglect,” he said.The Duke said that what stopped his wife from giving into suicidal thoughts was how “unfair” it would be to him.“The thing that stopped her from seeing it through was how unfair it would be on me after everything that had happened to my mum and to now be put in a position of losing another woman in my life, with a baby inside of her, our baby,” he said.“The scariest thing for her was her clarity of thought. She hadn’t ‘lost it.’ ... She was completely sane. Yet in the quiet of night, these thoughts woke her up.” Harry also claims Prince Charles did nothing to help his own “suffering” when he was struggling following the death of Princess Diana.“My father used to say to me when I was younger, he used to say to both William and I, ‘Well, it was like that for me so it’s going to be like that for you’, Harry told Oprah in the doc.“That doesn’t make sense. Just because you suffered, that doesn’t mean your kids have to suffer. Actually quite the opposite,” he said.“If you suffered, do everything you can to make sure that whatever negative experiences you had, you can make it right for your kids.“We chose to put our mental health first. That’s what we’re doing. And that’s what we will continue to do. Isn’t this all about breaking the cycle?“Isn’t it all about making sure that history doesn’t repeat itself? That whatever pain and suffering has happened to you, that you don’t pass on.”Harry says that he’s been in therapy for “four or five years” and also talks about turning his back on Britain and his family to “break the cycle” of grief being passed down the generations.The royal also opens up about how the trauma of his mother’s death led to him using alcohol and drugs to “mask” his emotions and to “feel less like I was feeling”.Harry was just 12 when Diana, Princess of Wales, died in August 1997 in a car crash while being pursued by the press in Paris.He said: “I was willing to drink, I was willing to take drugs, I was willing to try and do the things that made me feel less like I was feeling.”He told Oprah he would drink a week’s worth of alcohol on a Friday or Saturday night “not because I was enjoying it but because I was trying to mask something”.The five-part documentary series is available to watch on Apple TV now.Useful websites and helplinesMind, open Monday to Friday, 9am-6pm on 0300 123 3393.Samaritans offers a listening service which is open 24 hours a day, on 116 123 (UK and ROI - this number is FREE to call and will not appear on your phone bill).CALM (the Campaign Against Living Miserably) offer a helpline open 5pm-midnight, 365 days a year, on 0800 58 58 58, and a webchat service.The Mix is a free support service for people under 25. Call 0808 808 4994 or email [email protected] Mental Illness offers practical help through its advice line which can be reached on 0808 801 0525 (Monday to Friday 10am-4pm). More info can be found on rethink.org.READ MORE:Prince Harry Reveals He Used Drink And Drugs To Cope With Trauma Of Princess Diana’s DeathPrince Harry Reveals His Early Secret Meetup With Meghan MarklePrince Harry Nails Why You Shouldn't Say 'You Need Help' To Someone Struggling
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