Crawl dungeons, hunt dinosaurs, and learn to be a dad with our favorite PlayStation 4 titles.
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Modern birds live in just about every habitat on the planet, with only a few having adaptations allowing them to hunt active prey at night. Birds are derived from a group of dinosaurs known as theropods. Scientists have long wondered if any of the ancient dinosaurs had sensory adaptations allowing them to hunt at night. A new study led by … Continue reading
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US operator group Verizon thought it might be an idea to get into the media game by buying two internet dinosaurs.
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One of the most famous dinosaurs is the Tyrannosaurus Rex, more commonly known as the T. Rex. Movies featuring the dinosaur lead us to believe that the dinosaur was very fast, but it appears that isn’t true. A new study recently published by researchers from Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam has found that the T. Rex was about as fast as a … Continue reading
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The fearsome tyrannosaurus rex likely walked at a speed slightly slower than humans, according to a new study from Vrije Universiteit’s Human Movement Sciences student Pasha van Bijlert. The reason for this slow walking speed mostly had to do with the giant dinosaur’s equally big tail, which would have swung back and forth as the creature roamed prehistoric Earth. According … Continue reading
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Ferocious tyrannosaur dinosaurs may not have been solitary predators as long envisioned, but more like social carnivores such as wolves, new research unveiled Monday found.
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Google has added a bunch of popular Japanese characters to its AR feature in mobile search, which has previously featured animals, historical artifacts, and dinosaurs. The list of characters is taken from Japanese pop culture including anime, TV, and video games, with names like Pac-Man, Hello Kitty, mechs from Evangelion and Gundam, and more. The feature works on Google search on Android and the iOS Google app. When you enter the characters’ names, you’ll see an option to “see in your space” below the main search result, and that’ll let you drop a 3D model into your camera view. The models can appear at various degrees of scale, with an option to render at life size, though I’m not sure quite how accurate those measurements are. I was... Continue reading…
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When we think of the dinosaur age, most of us think about gigantic creatures that would’ve towered over modern humans. Not all of the dinosaurs around millions of years ago were gigantic creatures. Recently, an international team of paleontologists discovered a single footprint left by a dinosaur the size of a cat. The dinosaur roamed the Earth about 100 million … Continue reading
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There are some traditional toys and games no child should ever go without, says Tom Karen, a 95-year-old toymaker who lives in Cambridge, “like loveable dolls, soft toys, Lego, Monopoly, Connect Four – and yes, the Marble Run.”Karen invented the Marble Run in the 1960s after noticing how his own children found marbles thrilling. “I was surprised how much pleasure they got from a fixed run where all you could do was feed marbles at the top and watch them zig zag their way down,” he says. “It occurred to me, if a marble run could be constructed in different ways it would provide a creative challenge, with a very pleasing reward – it would make a hugely satisfying toy.”The nonagenarian invented the toy while working as managing director and chief designer at Ogle Design, where he also invented the Raleigh Chopper bicycle. He sold Marble Run to Kiddicraft, where it was rebranded ‘Builda, Helta, Skelta,’ but “commercial naivety” meant he failed to secure the royalties when the company was sold – and the design has been much-copied since.Still, the toy – which gives children an early experience with the principles of engineering, he says – is one of his “proudest achievements”. Karen officially retired in 1999, but when we speak, the designer says he’s been working on new toys “during the last few days”. His passion for his craft has been alive since childhood, he says. In the 1930s, Karen and his family left their hometown of Brno, Czechoslovakia, to flee from Hitler’s Nazi Party. Three years later, they arrived in the UK. “Perhaps my love of toys comes from having to leave them behind when I wasn’t ready for it – I recall clearly why I loved them.”A progressive thinker and a romantic, Karen approached Matchbox and Airfix – two popular toy-making brands – during his career, “pointing out they were neglecting the potential market for girls”, but he says he “found them too deeply rooted in their path.” He also regrets a trend where “the emphasis [is] on making profits – necessary as this is”. In recent years, Karen spends a lot of time designing toys for his grandchildren, and has also created a range of toy birds to raise money for the children’s unit at Addenbrooke’s Hospital in Cambridge. Perhaps my love of toys comes from having to leave them behind when I wasn’t ready for it.Tom KarenDavid Plagerston, 79, of Totnes in Devon, started making toys in the early 70s for the children he taught in Bethnal Green, east London and, like Karen, is still designing today. He’d been making toys for his daughter, back in 1971, and, through a “whole series of happy accidents”, got into making a living that way.In the 50 years since, he’s made a successful career making Noah’s Arks toys crafted out of carved wood – inspired by the arks in the Bethnal Green Museum of Childhood, near where he worked in the 1970s.The arks are individually carved and can sell for thousands. A recent customer “had loads and loads of animals,” says Plagerston. “He must have got close to four grand or something like that.”Making Mrs Noah is most difficult, he says. “If you make an animal that is not 100% right, nobody cares. I’d make a Mrs Noah and my wife would say, ‘Gosh she really looks sour puss, she looks like she’s having a bad day.’ We have high expectations of our females looking nice.“Sometimes, my wife would say, ‘Ooh she looks constipated!’”Plagerston has made arks for JK Rowling, the filmmaker Mike Leigh and Roger Waters of Pink Floyd – “I traded a Noah’s Ark for a pile of his records”.  Why the huge public love for the arks, then? “I think there’s a deep psychic attraction,” he says. “Noah’s Arks are a type of archetype story. What you need is a safe home – and that safe home for Noah and his family was a Noah’s Ark, where he took all the animals on board.”The workload is still constant: Plagerston mentions an ark that has to be shipped imminently, from “somebody who I’ve learned has bought four arks over the years, which is probably a record,” he says of the buyer. I describe myself as a compulsive maker.David PlagerstonOnly arthritis or weakened eyesight would stop him from crafting more arks, he says. “I describe myself as a compulsive maker, I have to be making something in order to be happy, I don’t mind what I make, whether it’s something I need for the house or garden.”Karen has discovered technology, as well as health, are the blocks to his continued work. “The attitude to toys and games have evolved with the advent of electronics, leaving me largely stranded but often full of admiration,” he adds.But Karen also still works, designing from his home. And last year he wrote his second book. He foresees a future where the world of classic toys co-exists with new-fangled technological ones in harmony. As he says: “Experience tells me that there will always be room for toys that are used creatively.” Images of Tom Karen are taken from Martin Mortimore’s film, Tom Karen: A Designer on Form. You’re reading Covid-Free Zone, a section designed to offer a little respite during the pandemic. For more fun and escapism, browse the articles here.Related...This Craft Blogger Has Ideas For All Those Jeans We're Not WearingDildos And Drag Outfits – Yep, 3D Printing Can Be SexyMeet The House Plant Enthusiasts Living In A Homemade JungleThe Dinosaur Dress-Up Trend Is Spreading. Here's How It Started
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Research published this week showed a team interested in the total population of individual species of dinosaurs. They began their work with one of the best-known dinosaurs, Tyrannosaurus rex, taking a crack at estimating new metrics based on what they already know to be true. They’ve used a relationship established between body size and population density in extant species to … Continue reading
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One of the most famous of all the dinosaurs that roamed the ancient Earth is the Tyrannosaurus rex or T Rex. Everyone is familiar with the T Rex making it arguably one of the most famous dinosaur species that ever existed. Many may have never considered how many T Rex dinosaurs lived in what is now North America about 2.5 … Continue reading
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The impact that wiped out the dinosaurs would probably have killed you too—unless you were in the exact right place and had made the exact right plans.
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A 50-piece snow globe collection and a full-size plastic cow are among the weird and wonderful items removals firms have packed up and relocated. While it’s not unusual for firms to pack people’s undies, painstakingly wrap glassware and box up bathroom essentials during a typical house move, we wanted to know the most unusual items they’ve ever come across. Wayne Winfield, who’s been a professional mover at McCarthy’s Removals in Leeds for 24 years, has packed up plenty of people’s homes – including premiership footballers and TV and sports personalities.Some of the more unusual items he’s moved include a genuine ejector seat from a second world war Phantom fighter jet, a full-size plastic cow, a brass statue of a client’s daughter in tutu in full ballet pose, and a resin effigy of the king himself, Elvis Presley – life-size, of course.“We once moved a life-size Predator model made out of motorbike parts,” he tells HuffPost UK. “That was ridiculously heavy, around 7ft tall, too!”One of his most memorable jobs, he says, was the relocation of the contents of a stately home, which was “like a museum”. There were massive oil paintings on the walls, suits of armour and various items of medieval weaponry on display.He was also involved in moving historical weapons from The Royal Armouries in Leeds – a job that sounds like something straight out of Mission Impossible. “As you can imagine, this isn’t your average removal,” he says. “I had to have a designated curator travel with me, on a predesignated and approved route.”Kate Hart, a removals and relocation manager at Fantastic Services, has also packed away a full set of knight armour – not from an armoury, however. More just a personal collection. “I thought those things are in castles and museums only, however it turns out that they are quite popular and this particular client even wears his armour at fairs from time to time,” she says.“I found that pretty fun and interesting, but packing the whole set is definitely not fun. There are a lot of small elements that need to be neatly packed and you have to pay attention not to place leather elements near metal edges to limit the risk of damage.”An expensive wine collection consisting of 1,000 bottles of red wine and a cryptocurrency farm are among some of the other unusual jobs she’s had.“I’ve never packed so much tech in a single job, and probably never will again,” she says of the crypto farm. “The video cards were expensive and considering we didn’t have the original packages, it wasn’t an easy task to pack them well! Using nylon and bubble wrap wasn’t an option, because it was a hot day and we didn’t want to risk it with condensation forming and damaging a card.”Collectors’ items are often memorable for the pros – not least because you really can’t afford to break them in transit.Maureen Bennett, at F&M Bennett Removals, recalls painstakingly wrapping and packing a client’s “extensive” 50-piece snow globe collection – a fiddly job involving a steady hand and a lot of patience. “Needless to say, a lot of bubble wrap and careful packing in different small boxes was required for their cherished collection,” she says.Hart vividly recalls having to pack up a collection of porcelain dolls. “We once had to pack a dozen of them,” she says. “They were all lined up in front of me, ready to be wrapped in paper and bubble wrap, it was like facing a trial.“I just hate the way their eyes open and close while you are shifting them around to pack them securely.” She ended up thoroughly creeped out, with a box filled with tiny, wrapped “mummies”.Thankfully they made it to their new home in one piece. You’re reading Covid-Free Zone, a section designed to offer a little respite during the pandemic. For more fun and escapism, browse the articles here.Related...How To Make The Latest Bread Trend: Spring Focaccia GardensMeet The House Plant Enthusiasts Living In A Homemade JungleThe Dinosaur Dress-Up Trend Is Spreading. Here's How It StartedIntroducing 'Squirrelman', The Amateur Snapper Taking Amazing Squirrel PicsDildos And Drag Outfits – Yep, 3D Printing Can Be SexyHow To Recycle Your Disposable Face Masks
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About 66 million years ago, the earth was covered with giant dinosaurs. A massive asteroid impacted the planet in the area that is now the Yucatán Peninsula. The massive impact resulted in the extinction of most species on the planet and left the planet shrouded in darkness from dust and debris in the atmosphere. A new study has shed light … Continue reading
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Epic has revealed the next Fortnite Fortography challenge, and this time you’ll have to get up close and personal with dinosaurs. The raptors have just hatched from their eggs and, well, they don’t have the friendliest disposition. That’ll make this one of the most fun photography challenges. The Fortnite Fortography contest is a bragging-rights challenge that seeks in-game screenshots featuring … Continue reading
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As promised, Fortnite went down in the wee hours of this morning to allow Epic to apply the game’s version 16.10 update. The game is back up again with the new update applied, and it’s bringing a lot of new features and additions along with it. For starters, we’re finding out what those apex predators Epic teased last night are, … Continue reading
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New research digs deep into the theory that carbon dioxide from volcanic eruptions in India helped kill off the dinosaurs.
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TV star Jessica Walter – best known for her legendary performance as Lucille Bluth in the sitcom Arrested Development – has died at the age of 80.Her daughter said in a statement released to Deadline: “It is with a heavy heart that I confirm the passing of my beloved mom Jessica. A working actor for over six decades, her greatest pleasure was bringing joy to others through her storytelling both on screen and off.“While her legacy will live on through her body of work, she will also be remembered by many for her wit, class and overall joie de vivre.”No cause of death was given, but Deadline reported that she died in her sleep at her home in New York.Jessica’s credits include 90210 and the TV sitcom Amy Prentiss, for which she won an Emmy in the Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series category.She also lent her voice to Fran Sinclair in the Jim Henson Television series Dinosaurs and, more recently, played Malory Archer in the animated series Archer.However, her most iconic role is that of Lucille Bluth, a character she played in the first three series of Arrested Development, and later reprised in the Netflix revival.Lucille was arguably the stand-out character of the critically acclaimed show, earning Jessica an Emmy nomination, and in later years, inspiring a number of social media memes.Jessica’s final on-screen credit was in an episode of American Housewife which aired earlier this year.She is survived by her daughter, Brooke Bowman, and grandson Micah Heymann.
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If you’ve spent any amount of time playing the new Primal season of Fortnite, you’ve likely come across two oddities: the Cuddle Fish, which appear to do nothing, and ‘Raptor Eggs,’ which can be broken apart to reveal a bunch of goo instead. What is the point of these items? Epic has explained how to use Cuddle Fish, and has … Continue reading
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