Plants can go almost anywhere in your home, even your bathroom.This project takes only a few minutes from start to finish if you have the right supplies on hand.If you don t, they re easy to pick up at your local hardware store.Here s what you need:A shower caddy that has suction cups and holes for drainage like this one from Amazon FertilizerYour plant of choice ones native to rainforests work well, like rhipsalis Line the bottom of the caddy with moss.Brush off as much soil as you can from your plant before placing it in the caddy and adding moss around it until you re almost to the brim of the caddy.Sprinkle in fertilizer and install on your shower wall.
The trabecular meshwork between the cornea and iris helps fluid move from the eye into a drainage system, as shown by the red arrows.When more fluid is produced than can be drained, pressure can build up in the eye, producing a condition called glaucoma.They started with a simple hypothesis: if the cells that maintain the mesh are lost with age, then it might be possible to restore the cells and improve the drainage in the eyes of these mice.As a result, seven percent of the mice treated this way developed tumors.Untreated mice carrying the glaucoma-inducing mutation ended up with fewer cells in the meshwork and increased pressure inside their eyes.But in most cases, we still have years of hard work before we can feel confident in the safety and efficacy of any one treatment.
Floods are the most common cause of weather-related disasters globally, causing billions of dollars worth of damage and the loss of hundreds of thousands of lives.As with all disasters, the poorest are hardest hit: they are more likely to live in vulnerable areas and less likely to have the skills or financial resources to protect themselves.But the charity I work for, Practical Action, has been developing and adapting technology to create end-to-end Flood Early Warning Systems with vulnerable communities in Nepal since 2002.Since 2013, Practical Action has collaborated with Zurich Insurance through the Zurich Flood Resilience Programme ZFRP to reach more people more effectively.Communication and disseminationThe Karnali communication network is activated when the river crosses the alert , warning , or danger threshold levels.To keep this up to date and well-stocked, each CDMC manages a community emergency fund.
This week, the Food and Drug Administration announced its approval of a stomach-draining device called AspireAssist; it is designed to combat obesity via a drainage tube and port implanted in the patient s stomach, allowing the patient to drain some of their stomach contents after they eat.When used properly, the device will drain about 30-percent of a meal's calories, according to the FDA, essentially serving as an alternative to lap band surgeries.Comcast Business Internetbusiness.comcast.com/governmentGet Internet Services to Help Keep Employees and Citizens Connected!Project Managementcorporatetrainingmaterials.comComplete course material to teach project management skills.The FDA warns that it does come with some side effects, including things like feeling nauseous and vomiting.The AspireAssist device has gone through testing, including a clinical trial involving 111 patients and 60 control patents.
We ve dug through all the online tutorials on the web, and gone the extra mile to pinpoint projects that are equal parts easy, affordable, and fun.While attempting to combat mosquitos in Guatemala, professor Gerard Ulibarri originally intended on using mosquito egg-killing ovitraps.Pieces of an old tire outfit with a drainage valve and a helping of pheromones.At the end of a year-long study using these DIY traps, it s reported that they eliminated seven times more mosquitos than typical traps — killing an astounding 18,000 larvae per month.Smithsonian.comSince Ulibarri isn t one to keep the plans for this incredible trap to himself, he has shared the plans.So if you ve got a spare tire laying around, a few extra hours on your hands, and want to do your part to thwarting mosquitos in your area, this is your project.
All images: Cooper et al., 2016British geophysicists have discovered evidence of an ancient drainage network buried beneath Greenland s ice sheet that once extended across nearly a fifth of its total surface.Some of the channels within this system were about a mile deep and over seven miles wide.Using ice-penetrating radar and sophisticated elevation modeling software, their scans revealed a vein-like network of valleys that spread inland from the Jakobshavn Glacier Greenland s largest outlet glacier across a region comparable in size to the Ohio River Basin.This wasn t just some piddly river system.About 3.5 million years ago, for about 2.3 million years, water was pouring into Greenland along its eastern edges.Eventually, the climate cooled yet again, and the Jakobshavn Glacier emerged, obscuring the remnants of this once mighty river system.
Bo Thunholm photographer: Julio Gonzalez C / SGU Water shortages on Öland and Gotland due to the rainless winter, thin overburden and extensive drainage. Geological Survey of Sweden, SGU, taking monthly produce maps of groundwater levels in the country based on measurements of some 30 observation tubes. - Had there been a different color, we put it on Öland and Gotland. The extensive drainage made during 1800 and 1900 quarters to create farmland have exacerbated the problem. The past winter was extremely poor rainfall, which has led to groundwater reservoirs is not loaded properly. - It can take a very long time before Öland and Gotland sheep normal groundwater levels, maybe some years in the future, because there is a large deficit, says Bo Thunholm.
Big pool toys, like pool noodles and other floaties, can be tough to store because they take up a lot of space and don t really collapse well.Keep yours organized this summer with a plastic hamper—they re cheap, and big enough to hold everything.You want a hamper that has holes for drainage, and of course, one that s at least half as tall as the pool noodles so it won t topple over .If you throw in your other pool toys, like inflatable balls or weighted rings, you can just carry the whole hamper to the pool when it s time to go swimming.The hamper also gives your kids one spot that all the pool toys belong so they don t leave them laying around.Since the sun and chlorine from the pool water will wear on the plastic over time, get an inexpensive hamper that you don t mind replacing.
Apart from the gift of life from God, this is the other biggest blessing that has come to us, said villager Mary Mwikali Kiminza, a mother of five and a member of the village s Ithine Self Help Group.My feet are now rested without endless trips to fetch water , and my children can now concentrate in school because I no longer ask them to follow me to the river, she said.Kibwezi sub-county, where Kikumbulyu village is located, is hilly with huge rocks - not the kind of environment that supports traditional methods of water conservation such as water pans or sand dams, which use wet sand to hold water.Photo by Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images But since 2010, the Africa Sand Dam Foundation ASDF , a Kenyan non-governmental organization, has worked with villagers in the Makueni area to build rock catchment systems, taking advantage of the local geography to make themselves more water secure.A concrete wall is built to direct the water that trickles down the rock surface into a sand and gravel filter, then down pipes into covered storage tanks.
But, there is no question that the incredible success of the Pokemon Go game is an absolute watershed moment for augmented reality.Despite serious questions about security issues both digital and physical , battery life impact and cloud infrastructure support, among other issues, the game s incredible, nearly overnight success now means that no one will ever need to explain what augmented reality is to almost anyone.And it s something that this still fledgling technology really needed.So, it s important to recognize the Pokemon Go phenomenon for what it is—a game changing opportunity that sets the stage, eventually, for the success of other augmented reality-based applications and devices.At the same time, it s important to point out that this does not mean we will soon see a raft of successful AR-based games and other applications.We will undoubtedly see an enormous number of AR-related launches, regardless of how quickly or not the Pokemon Go craze fades out, but the vast majority will have little to no impact whatsoever.
When Montpelier decided to rip up a pothole-riddled asphalt road and replace it with gravel in 2009, it didn t see itself at the forefront of a growing trend in public works.They filled the space between Vermont s cruddy soil and hardier dirt and gravel up top with a geotextile , a hardy fabric that helps with erosion, stability and drainage.8 Lessons for Fixing the Cities of the FutureParis Opens the First Stretch of Its 28-Mile Bike SuperhighwayIn an era of dismal infrastructure spending, where the American Society of Civil Engineers gives the country s roads a D grade, rural areas all over the country are embracing this kind of strategic retreat.Transportation agencies in at least 27 states have unpaved roads, according to a new report from the National Highway Cooperative Highway Research program.
Plastic bags are a public nuisance.After cradling your take out or groceries, they get tangled up in trees, clog drainage ditches, and pile up in landfills forever.But photographer Vilde Rolfsen collects all those unsightly bags and makes art.If You Look Closely, These Mountains Are Actually a Bustling MetropolisArchitecture Gets a Little Sweeter When It s Made of GumLook at These Beautiful Planets JK They re Bacteria From Public Buses
Artist s depiction of Echovenator sandersi.Say hello to the Echo Hunter, a 27 million-year-old toothed whale that s helping scientists understand how these ancient sea creatures evolved the ability to hear high-frequencies underwater, and then turn that ability into a killing technique.In a new paper published in Current Biology, researchers from the New York Institute of Technology and the National Museum of National History in France describe a new species of whale, called Echovenator sandersi meaning echo hunter , that s providing important new clues about the evolution of high-frequency hearing in aquatic mammals.This research pushes the origin of ultrasonic hearing in whales about 10 million years earlier than previous estimates.E. sandersi was an ancient relative of the dolphin, and it could hear frequencies well above the range of human hearing.A team led by NYIT professor Morgan Churchill came to this conclusion after analyzing a 27 million-year-old skull that was discovered in a South Carolina drainage ditch in 2001.
If you travel with a lot of expensive camera, video, or music gear, there s a good chance you stuff it all in a Pelican case to ensure it arrives unscathed.The company is known for its nearly indestructible cases, and now that it s made a cooler, you ll never have to worry about something happening to your drinks.Outfitted with locking latches that will foil everything from a raccoon to a bear, the Pelican Elite cooler also features freezer-grade seals and extra-thick insulation to keep everything inside chilled for as long as possible.Drop it off a cliff and the cooler will not only survive, but your beers will still be cold by the time you climb down to rescue it.Available in two capacities—30 quarts for $275 and 70 quarts for $400—the Elite also comes in four different color combos, includes a drainage spigot, cup holders on the lid, and a bottle opener tucked under its rim.And there s no reason you can t also use it to transport expensive gadgets when filled with enough bubble wrap to stop your toys from bouncing around.
A woman collects water from a tube-well in Dhaka, Bangladesh, in April.A river basin in southern Asia is so enormous that 750 million people rely on it for their groundwater.Now, a new study in Nature Geoscience presents an equally staggering stat: 60% of that water is unfit for drinking or farming because it's contaminated by salt or arsenic, reports the Guardian.About 23% of the groundwater in the Indo-Gangetic Basin to a depth of 650 feet is too salty—an issue perhaps caused by poor farmland irrigation or drainage—and another 37% is tainted by toxic levels of arsenic, researchers say.Like salt, arsenic is present naturally, but levels can spike with mining and the use of fertilizers.The basin, so named because it's near the Indus and Ganges rivers, serves people in Pakistan, India, Nepal, and Bangladesh, and it accounts for one-quarter of the world's groundwater.
there were usually only a handful of people, while the us is 24.Off we go to slightly increase in the company consideration and let's keep this 5-year-sunnis play -recorded with notes.Until one early spring morning, the letterbox drop invite the extraordinary general meeting to decide on half a million euro renovation loan.the Government had put pace on the projects: stand in front of hundreds of thousands of ceiling the latest and drainage renovation.the meeting for the day is no longer enough for club room, need to arrange a bigger space.we were a little bit bigger project to wake people interested in the house in the company's projects - i.e., their money.
As the election nears, our country can at times feel like a hideous and hateful place.Let this map of the United States river basins made by Imgur user Fejetlenfej remind you that, at the very least, our country can be beautiful.Fejetlenfej—a geographer who sells their maps on Etsy—created the image using QGIS software, which is an open-source geographic information system.The map depicts both the permanent and temporary streams and rivers, the creator explained.They divided the streams into catchment areas, which show when rainfall flows into a river, lake, or reservoir.Using the Strahler Stream Order Classification, which is a system used by geologists to define stream sizes, Fejetlenfej explained that on the map, the higher the stream order, the thicker the line.
GIF Before-and-after images taken in 2011 and 2016 show dramatic reductions in the Farmington Bay basin of Great Salt Lake.Image: Joshua Stevens/Landsat/US Geological Survey Located in Utah, the Great Salt Lake is the largest saltwater lake in the Western Hemisphere, but years of drought and over-irrigation of nearby rivers have resulted in dramatic declines in water levels.New satellite photos reveal the disturbing extent to which this ecologically sensitive lake is shrinking.Typically, this iconic lake covers an area of around 1,700 square miles 4,400 square kilometers , so it s not going to disappear any time soon.But the lake is drying up and shrinking; in October 2016, the Great Salt Lake reached its lowest level in recorded history, covering an area of 1,050 square miles 2,700 square km .
The UK's wine makers might be about to enjoy a few decades of global dominance, thanks to research that suggests climate change and the warmer, wetter weather we can expect to see, could turn parts of the UK into mini-Frances perfect for growing the classic old types of grapes.The University College London team based its research on the assumption that average temperatures will rise by 2.2C by the year 2100 and that this will be accompanied by a 5.6 per cent increase in rainfall.That should mean that the Black Country in the West Midlands might undergo an industrial revolution of another kind, as conditions there might become perfect for growing the chardonnay and pinot noir varieties of grapes that thrive in warmer climates.Professor Mark Maslin from UCL said: "This study could signal how we think long-term about British wine production and redraw the future wine map of the world.However, exactly where would be best for particular grapes will depend on site, slope, aspect, soil and drainage as wine-making is as much an art as it is a science."Want more updates from Gizmodo UK?
The UK's wine makers might be about to enjoy a few decades of global dominance, thanks to research that suggests climate change and the warmer, wetter weather we can expect to see, could turn parts of the UK into mini-Frances perfect for growing the classic old types of grapes.The University College London team based its research on the assumption that average temperatures will rise by 2.2C by the year 2100 and that this will be accompanied by a 5.6 per cent increase in rainfall.That should mean that the Black Country in the West Midlands might undergo an industrial revolution of another kind, as conditions there might become perfect for growing the chardonnay and pinot noir varieties of grapes that thrive in warmer climates.Professor Mark Maslin from UCL said: "This study could signal how we think long-term about British wine production and redraw the future wine map of the world.However, exactly where would be best for particular grapes will depend on site, slope, aspect, soil and drainage as wine-making is as much an art as it is a science."Want more updates from Gizmodo UK?
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