Image: SD Biju via Eureka AlertUntil recently, only six frog mating positions had been documented—which is still five more than most people would have ever expected—but as New Scientist points out, a seventh froggystyle position has been found.Before you go taking sex advice from the Bombay Night Frog, let it be known that the dorsal straddle position, as the newly discovered mating style is called, involves no actual genital contact.I guess frogs are kinky like that.As she lays her eggs the sperm drips down, fertilizing them.The new position was discovered over the course of 40 visits to the Western Gnats of India between 2010 and 2012 by a team of researchers led by Professor SD Biju from the University of Delhi.Males were located by their mating calls and were then filmed with an infrared camera once they had found a suitable female to straddle dorsally.
A patent recently filed by Mercedes-Benz parent company Daimler sheds light on a new technology that could make driving in snowy and icy conditions much safer.A diagram submitted with the patent illustrates an innovative system that improves traction by spraying hot water on tires in order to melt snow and ice.The water is pumped out of a small tank it s stored in and through a heat exchanger, a process that makes it hot enough to melt snow.It s then sprayed directly onto the spinning tire by three small nozzles integrated into the wheel well.Sensors presumably send a signal to the ECU when the tires themselves need to be de-iced.The system is designed to collect water as it drips down the rear window — it can be either rainwater, water from a car wash, or melting snow.
Sunglasses, shorts, tank tops, and sandals are the usual accessories you think of when you re getting ready for summer.But with climate change pushing summer temps higher and higher ever year, it s probably not a bad idea to add the Zero Breeze portable battery-powered air conditioner to that list.Unlike the portable air conditioner that sits in the corner of a room that requires an exhaust vent, a power socket, and a bucket for catching drips, the Zero Breeze is as compact as a boombox and can run for up to five hours on its own rechargeable battery.The environmentally-friendly refrigerant it relies on, Dupont R-134a, is the same coolant used for mobile air conditioners attached to motorhomes and other vehicles.Unlike portable coolers that rely on a constant supply of ice, the refrigerant apparently never needs to be topped off, although depending on how long you have the unit, though, it may eventually need to be replaced.And despite the Zero Breeze s tiny footprint, the air conditioner can cool a 50 square feet room down to 6.6 degrees Celsius, which is actually cold enough to require a jacket and a warm drink.
Sunglasses, swimsuits, tank tops, and sandals are the usual accessories you think of when you re getting ready for summer.But with climate change pushing summer temps higher and higher ever year, it s probably not a bad idea to add the Zero Breeze portable battery-powered air conditioner to that list.Unlike the portable air conditioner sitting in the corner of your bedroom that requires an exhaust vent, an outlet, and a bucket for catching drips, the Zero Breeze is as compact as a boombox and can run for up to five hours on its own rechargeable battery.The environmentally-friendly refrigerant it relies on, Dupont R-134a, is the same coolant used for mobile air conditioners attached to motorhomes and other vehicles.Unlike portable coolers that rely on a constant supply of ice, the refrigerant apparently never needs to be topped off, although depending on how long you have the unit, though, it may eventually need to be replaced.And despite the Zero Breeze s tiny footprint, the air conditioner can cool a 50 square feet room down to 44 degrees Fahrenheit, which is actually cold enough to require a jacket and a warm drink.
As video game consoles get more and more powerful, the line between what's real and what isn't in sports games gets increasingly blurry.We're at the point where each stadium is lovingly realized, each uniform's cloth moves in the wind, and each athlete's sweat drips realistically."Madden NFL 17" is no different.Here's how this year's game looks on the newest hardware: View As:
If you're a Windows tester, you'll be familiar with the concept of fast and slow rings for the delivery of previews – and Microsoft has now decided that Office Insiders should use the same system when it comes to the deployment of early builds.In actual fact, Office for Mac users already had the option for slow and fast releases with preview builds, but now that has been expanded to those testing Office on Windows and Windows Mobile .For now, those testing the productivity suite on rival mobile operating systems iOS and Android won't get the choice, but it's in the pipeline for them as well.If you select Office Insider Fast, or the fast ring as it's commonly known, you'll get preview builds delivered more quickly, allowing you to play with new features as soon as possible.But these earlier versions are somewhat rougher around the edges, and you may well encounter a good deal more bugs.The slow ring drips previews out at a slower pace, naturally, but they're more polished.
In addition to reinventing the automobile by bringing electric propulsion to the masses with its forthcoming Model 3, Tesla has also been furiously revamping the way we buy cars.The latest salvo involves a half-dozen Model X SUVs towing Airstream trailers that have been outfitted as rolling Tesla design studios."Like all Tesla galleries, the mobile Airstream fleet will be staffed with Tesla product specialists, combining Tesla s friendly, informative approach and best-in-class customer service with the opportunity for customers to see Model X first-hand and design a Tesla of their own," the automaker said in a statement.As with the pop-up galleries that Tesla has opened for brief periods in the past — there was one in New York's chic Hamptons vacation community last year — the Model X-plus-Airstream idea literally drips cool.When the crossover SUV was launched in 2015, it of course pulled a retro-groovy Airstream on stage, to showcase its 5,000-pound towing capacity.It was a deft combination of the classic — the first Airstream trailers went on sale in the 1930s — and the futuristic.That was art direction; this is marketing, something Tesla needs.Historically, the startup has done almost no advertising, but it wants the Model X to post better sales numbers, catching up to the Model S sedan.The crossover SUV market is white hot right now, and Tesla requires profits from that segment to fuel the debut of the Model 3, scheduled to hit the road in 2017.The Model X should be able to bring in plenty of money — like the Model S, it's pricing sweetspot is around $100,000 — but production has been beset with delays due to the Tesla-admitted over-complexity of the design, which features exotic, upswinging "falcon wing" doors and rear seats intended to evoke sculpture.Additionally, this itinerant approach to Model X customization fits with Tesla's disruptive retail philosophy.
Shutterstock When spaghetti sauce drips on the floor, a little part of youIt's not the main mass of mess that's the problem, as paper towel commercials are wont to convince us, but the drippy splatter.When bits of sauce smash into the ground, they flatten and burst into a mist of tiny droplets, which you find days later — dried and crusty, yet still greasy — if you don't do a
I work for a small startup, with only two people including myself working on our marketing efforts.We're looking for a CRM that can a organize 50,000 contacts/leads and b has smart email automation for drip email campaigns.Our email efforts include plain text intro emails about our product, content newsletters, and product onboarding.And we want the ability to move users into different email drips based on their interactions opens, clicks, etc., as well as knowing when they're spamming us.We've been using Contactually, mainly because of the low cost, only $70/user, but it lacks analytics, doesn't allow us to move contacts based on their interactions with our emails, and has led to a lot of people marking us as spam.
Enlarge / Ron is good at computer.Ron AmadeoPerhaps you know someone, dear reader, who is what they call a "car person."So, while you Americans relax on your couch in post-turkey bliss or hide in the bathroom so you don't have to talk about politics with your family—and while the rest of the world goes about its normal Thursday business—we present to you five crazier-than-they-need-to-be Ars Technica staffer home IT setups.This past summer, when we began a major cull of our garden and my wife single-handedly tore out a mess over some overgrown plants , I was tasked with mapping our existing in-ground drips, re-laying new drips where necessary, and giving our Pi some love.Eric Bangeman: My office, my lifeIf I had contributed to this article a decade ago, I would ve written about how I hardwired my 1929-vintage house with Cat-5e cable and used a gigabit switch for all of my devices three or four desktop PCs and a console .
The latest motherboards from Asus make some small changes that really matter.For instance, you ll finally get an internal header connector for USB 3.1, so you can put USB-C ports on front of your desktop PC.Of course, you ll also need new case that supports this connector.The Maximus 9 Apex board has a special daughtercard that lets you slide two M.2 cards into a DIMM slot.This isn t to put them closer to the CPU for higher bandwidth, but farther away from the graphics cards so they don t get too hot.Then there s the Maximus 9 Extreme, which comes with its own custom water block and a little warning device in case water drips from your loops—and the device warns you on an app for your phone!
Usenix Enigma 2017 Hacking sensors isn t as big an area of research as hacking operating systems and firmware, but the results of simple physical hacks can be far-reaching.In a talk at Enigma 2017 Yongdae Kim, professor in the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology s Graduate School of Information Security, showed how active and passive sensors can be hacked by simple laser pointer or speakers set on just the right frequency.Passive sensors, like gyroscopes and magnetometers, simply measure their environment and report back.Active sensors, like radar and sonar, send out a signal and then take measurements on the return signal.Many materials have a resonant frequency that causes them to oscillate – think breaking a wine glass with a high note – and it s just a matter of finding that frequency.Kim and his team found the correct frequency for gyroscopes in seven of the 15 commercial drones they tested, including hardware from STMicro and InvenSense.
There are several ways to prevent those inevitable wine bottle drips from staining your tablecloth.You can wrap the bottle in a napkin while you pour, just skip the wine glass altogether and drink straight from the bottle, or use your physics degrees to re-engineer the bottle’s spout so it never drips again.As a wine aficionado, Brandeis University biophysicist Daniel Perlman has almost certainly tried all of the above, but he’s had the most success with that last approach.Over the course of three years, through some of the most enjoyable research he’s probably ever conducted, Perlman studied the flow of liquid as it leaves the lip of a wine bottle.Slow-motion video revealed that a stream of wine, or really any liquid poured from a bottle, has the tendency to curl back over the lip and then run down the side due to the bottle being made of glass which is hydrophilic—it attracts water-based liquids.There are contraptions on the market you can attach to a wine bottle to counteract this effect, but Perlman wanted to solve the problem, at its source, once and for all.
There are several ways to prevent those inevitable wine bottle drips from staining your tablecloth.You can wrap the bottle in a napkin while you pour, just skip the wine glass altogether and drink straight from the bottle, or use your physics degrees to re-engineer the bottle’s spout so it never drips again.As a wine aficionado, Brandeis University biophysicist Daniel Perlman has almost certainly tried all of the above, but he’s had the most success with that last approach.Over the course of three years, through some of the most enjoyable research he’s probably ever conducted, Perlman studied the flow of liquid as it leaves the lip of a wine bottle.Slow-motion video revealed that a stream of wine, or really any liquid poured from a bottle, has the tendency to curl back over the lip and then run down the side due to the bottle being made of glass which is hydrophilic—it attracts water-based liquids.There are contraptions on the market you can attach to a wine bottle to counteract this effect, but Perlman wanted to solve the problem, at its source, once and for all.
Groove breakthrough prevents shameful leakageVideo A biophysicist has found a way to save precious wine drops from leaking down the side of the bottle after it’s poured into a glass.There are ways to prevent spillage with nifty devices inserted into the bottle neck.But Daniel Perlman, a senior research scientist and inventor at Brandeis University in Massachusetts, America, wanted to change the wine bottle itself.“I didn’t want there to be the additional cost or inconvenience of buying an accessory,” Perlman said.The painstaking three-year study started with analyzing videos of wine being poured in slow-motion.
For something that has just one job, you have to admit that there is a fairly fundamental design flaw in wine bottles.Namely that they are not capable of delivering the precious cargo from bottle to glass without a pathetic little post-pour dribble going all over the place.While many have tried to come up with a solution to the greatest problem of our times (we’re sticking with just putting a straw in the bottle), most of the devices on the market require wedging a contraction in the bottleneck.And ain’t nobody got time for that.Now a biophysicist has put his brain to the best possible use imaginable and designed a non-drip wine bottle with a specialised lip that catches the drips before they fall to a wasted death.Taking three years (good things come to those who wait) Daniel Perlman from Brandeis University has intricately studied the science of glass bottles, which cause drips because glass is hydrophilic and attracts water-based liquids.
p It took Ridley Scott 35 years, but the sci-fi filmmaking legend finally got to make his version of Aliens.At any rate, now we have Alien Covenant, and it's probably as much of a James Cameron-styled film as we may ever get out of Scott.If you're a longtime series fan and have grown into either an apologist or a hater, you're going to love this sequel's adherence to Alien film lore, its zillions of answers, and its return to terror sequences chock full of gooey, murderous xenomorphs.No spoilers here—which leaves us a bit quietThe film wastes no time splitting its audience in half, between those who saw Prometheus and those who did not.The opening sequence sees actor Michael Fassbender return as a humanoid robot named David, and it immediately delivers surprise tension and lore, along with a Prometheus plot payoff that will be lost on anybody who skipped the 2012 film.
p In a ruling, on Thursday, that left in place a lower court’s stay on President Donald Trump’s travel ban, the Fourth U.S.Circuit Court of Appeals went well beyond saying that the White House’s case was mistaken, misguided, or just inadequate.Instead, Chief Judge Roger Gregory wrote that behind the arguments in defense of the ban lay “a dangerous idea”—namely, that “this Court lacks the authority to review high-level government policy of the sort here.” The Trump Administration had said that the courts simply could not second-guess the President on matters of national security and immigration.This is not true, and never has been, Gregory wrote, despite the government lawyers’ “casual assertion” to the contrary.Then, a week after his Inauguration, Trump issued an executive order barring the entry of people from seven mostly Muslim nations (Iraq, Iran, Somalia, Sudan, Yemen, Syria, and Libya), a suspension of America’s refugee program, and a more extensive shutdown of the entry of refugees from Syria.It also included measures, with regard to the refugee program, to favor religious minorities—in practice, Christians.
p Ogilvy & Mather, together with Greenpeace Australia, has created an interactive installation in Sydney to raise awareness and drum up public support to fight climate change.The installation shows a polar bear perched on top of a slowly melting iceberg with a message inviting viewers to commit to supporting the fight against climate change via a donation or signing a petition as part of Greenpeace’s Save The Arctic imitative.The drips of the iceberg will slowly erode the polar bear’s home until a viewer interacts with the display.The drips then would slow down and freeze in mid-air before flowing against gravity back into the iceberg, with the effect getting stronger as more people get involved.“One of the biggest challenges in dealing with climate change is that people find it difficult to see the effect that their efforts can have on such a huge global problem.With this installation, we hope to illustrate that a collective effort can indeed make a real difference.
It practically drips imagination, whimsy, and charm at every turn.As the title implies, you possess the rare and now-forbidden power of literacy, enabling you to read ancient tomes and follow clues to the sites of competitions known as Rites.Rites themselves are three-on-three matches that feel like a blend of hockey and netball.Characters have protective auras, which temporarily banish enemies if they come into contact with them.However, only one member at a time can actually move, requiring you to think fast to decide when to pass to a teammate.In general, matches are quick, scrappy, and fun, with a rule set that's easy to understand but offers enough depth so as not to feel dumbed down.
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